OAI Archive: Erasmus University Rotterdam

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100 entries most recently downloaded from the archive "Erasmus University Rotterdam"

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  1. V. F. C. Servant, Revolutions & Re-Iterations.
    The same year as the opening of the Woodstock music festival, a small medical school in Hamilton, Ontario, launched a daring new medical education programme in which lectures were replaced by small-group, interdisciplinary problem-based tutorials. Problem-based learning, as it became known, took the world of higher education by storm, such that today over 500 institutions in the World claim to use this method in almost every field of study, from engineering to liberal arts. Through the in-depth historical analysis of archive (...)
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  2. H. Letiche & J. Van Uden, Answers to a Discussion Note: On the ‘Metaphor of the Metaphor’.
    Should a debate of the choice between metaphorical investigation and epistemological realism in organizational research be prioritized as Willy McCourt called for in Organization Studies? We argue here against doing any such thing — a ‘realism’ debate in organizational theory would merely be a ‘red herring’. Theoretical investigation from Ricoeur to Derrida has liberated us from the need to re-visit the theme, but examination of Gareth Morgan's intellectual development, as begun by McCourt, is of interest because it reveals two very (...)
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  3. T. Pistorius, The Rhetoric of Investment Theory.
    Uncertainty is a feeling of anxiety and a part of culture since the dawn of civilization. Civilizations have invented numerous ways to cope with uncertainty, statistics is one of those technologies. The rhetoric as the discourse of investment theory uncovers that the theory of statistics applied is a blind spot in the current conversation about investment theory and practice. Probability and prediction in investment theory look like a tying sale, since investment theory is founded on stochastical predictability. The proof of (...)
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  4. A. J. Meijer & V. J. J. M. Bekkers, A Metatheory of E-Government: Creating Some Order in a Fragmented Research Field.
    Theoretical fragmentation in e-government studies hampers the further development of this field of study. This paper argues that a metatheory can reduce theoretical confusion. Ideas from the philosophy of the social sciences are used to develop a metatheory of e-government consisting of three dimensions: explaining/understanding, holism/individualism and change/maintenance. This metatheory is used to analyze a corpus of papers on e-government in both journals on public administration and information systems. The analysis of the 116 papers shows a bias towards explaining e-government, (...)
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  5. S. Stremersch, N. M. A. Camacho, S. Vanneste & I. W. J. Verniers, Unraveling Scientific Impact: Citation Types in Marketing Journals.
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  6. H. Joosten, Nietzsche’s New Dawn.
    Professional higher education is expected to educate large numbers of students to become innovative professionals within a time frame of three or four years. A mission impossible? Not necessarily, according to Henriëtta Joosten who is a philosopher as well as a teacher. She uses the experimental, liberating, but also dangerous ideas of Friedrich Nietzsche to rethink contemporary higher professional education. What does it mean to teach students to strive for better in a professional world where horizons tend to disperse and (...)
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  7. J. T. Nieuwstraten, Historical and Political Thought in the Seventeenth-Century Dutch Republic: The Case of Marcus Zuerius Boxhorn.
    This dissertation constitutes the first comprehensive study of the historical and political thought of the Dutch scholar Marcus Zuerius Boxhorn. Boxhorn was one of the most prolific scholars of his age. His Latin works were translated into Dutch, French, and English, and published in England and the Holy Roman Empire. This study shows that he is to be regarded as an important transitional figure between the age of late humanism and the age of the early Enlightenment. Careful analysis that takes (...)
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  8. J. Semeniuk, The Alignment of Morality and Profitability in Corporate Social Responsibility.
    Nowadays most of the big companies pride themselves on their social responsibility. When visiting the websites of IBM, Cisco, ING, Philips, BP, etc., one will easily find a tab called ‘corporate social responsibility’, or ‘sustainability’.1 Here, companies describe how they contribute to the community and balance their impact on the environment. Why do they do that? There is a long tradition of moral considerations for commerce. In the early days of capitalism, the goal of the business was solely to make (...)
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  9. S. Stremersch, In Search of an Audience..
    For an academic, finding an audience is critical. However, finding an audience is not always easy for most marketing academics. This inaugural address explores what the challenges are in finding an audience, among fellow scholars, students, public policy, industry, or society in general. It finds that the academic audience for marketing research is: often small; constrained to the own discipline; and mostly located in the United States. The student audience is also under pressure, due to: the difficult translation of academic (...)
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  10. G. Vasiliauskaitė, Epistemic Compatibilism.
    Knowledge is important for us, human beings, for a variety of reasons, starting with trivial but necessary reasons to live your life. Western man also has a collective project that is constitutive of its culture: science; and the aim of science is to gather knowledge about the world in its broadest meaning: from the origin of a particular disease to the origin of man, life, planet Earth and the universe, from why the orbits move as they do to why a (...)
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  11. F. Claveau, Causal Reasoning in Economics: A Selective Exploration of Semantic, Epistemic and Dynamical Aspects.
    Economists reason causally. Like many other scientists, they aim at formulating justified causal claims about their object of study. This thesis contributes to our understanding of how causal reasoning proceeds in economics. By using the research on the causes of unemployment as a case study, three questions are adressed. What are the meanings of causal claims? How can a causal claim be adequately supported by evidence? How are causal beliefs affected by incoming facts? In the process of answering these semantic, (...)
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  12. I. U. M.äki, Two Philosophies of the Rhetoric of Economics.
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  13. M. L. De Lange, Moving Circles: Mobile Media and Playful Identities.
    The mobile phone has become part of our everyday lives with astonishing speed. Over four billion people now have access to mobile phones, and this number keeps increasing. Mobile media technologies shape how we communicate with each other, and relate to the world. This raises questions about their influence on identity. Medium-specific properties and user-practices challenge the idea that we understand ourselves through stories. It is proposed that the notion of play sheds new light on how technologies shape identities. The (...)
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  14. J. C. Ott, How Much Competition Do We Need in a Civilized Society?
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  15. H. W. Blom, Causality and Morality in Politics: The Rise of Naturalism in Dutch Seventeenth-Century Political Thought.
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  16. S. G. J. Van de Walle, International Comparisons of Public Sector Performance: How to Move Ahead?
    Measuring and comparing the overall performance of countries’ public sectors requires agreement on definitions and objectives of government. I argue that such an agreement is about finding a consensus rather about finding better definitions. Measuring government requires a number of leaps of faith, where certain definitions, assumptions and statistics are accepted as good enough for measurement and comparison. The political science and economic research community have a different tradition of dealing with such agreements and leaps of faith, and this is (...)
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  17. P. Schuurman, Of the Conduct of the Understanding, by John Locke.
    The editor’s General Introduction is divided into two parts. The first part, ‘Context’, discusses Locke’s analysis of the nature of error, the causes of error and the prevention and cure of error in the Conduct. His enquiry is placed in the context of his way of ideas as given in his Essay concerning Human Understanding. Locke’s two-stage way of ideas, his occupation with our mental faculties and with method form the interrelated main ingredients of his logic of ideas. There is (...)
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  18. J. C. Ott, Book Reviews: How It Feels When Life Suddenly Gets Better Review of “The Nature of Happiness” by Desmond Morris Little Books Ltd., London, UK, 2004 ISBN: 1 904435 28 9, 176 Pages. [REVIEW]
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  19. J. C. Ott, Call for Policy Shift to Happiness.
    Richard Layard is an economist and an expert in unemployment and inequality. He worked for the British government as an economic advisor and in 2000 he became a member of the House of Lords. His ambition is to shift the direction of public policy away from crude economic goals like wealth to "well-being" and "quality of life". Layard advocates an evidence-based utilitarian policy approach and tries to demonstrate how the insights of the new happiness science, in particular positive psychology, can (...)
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  20. R. Veenhoven, Does Happiness Differ Across Cultures?
    There is a longstanding discussion on whether happiness is culturally relative or not. The available data suggest that all humans tend to assess how much they like their lives. The evaluation draws both on affective experience, which is linked to gratification of universal human needs and on cognitive comparison, which is framed by cultural standards of the good life. The overall appraisal seems to depend more on the former than on the latter source of information. Conditions for happiness appear to (...)
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  21. S. Van de Vathorst & C. Alvarez-Dardet, Doctors as Judges: The Verdict on Responsibility for Health.
    Debate Smokers, drinkers, animal fat eaters, the inactive and the obese, they are all blamed for their potential ill health by doctors, society and their families, in western societies victim blaming is a widespread phenomenon. Doctors are encouraged or even put under pressure to judge behaviour as a tool to allocate and ration medical procedures, by governments or insurance companies that want to keep the healthcare expenditure within strict limits. In recent years the knowledge obtained by risk factor epidemiology and (...)
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  22. S. Stremersch & P. C. Verhoef, Globalization of Authorship in the Marketing Discipline: Does It Help or Hinder the Field?
    Marketing scholars have reflected upon the marketing discipline's internal evolution before. However, no prior study has assessed the globalization of authorship in our discipline, let alone assessed its consequences for the field. This paper addresses the following two questions: Is there evidence of increasing globalization of authorship in the marketing discipline? If so, does it help or hinder the field? Our work shows empirically how the globalization of our discipline evolved, how U.S. dominance is fading, and which countries experienced a (...)
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  23. T. -D. Truong, Feminist Knowledge and Human Security.
    The essay proposes to re-orient feminist debates on epistemology towards the care-security nexus as a pathway that can plausibly provide an integral understanding of a human-centred and eco-minded security. Seeing "gender" in binary terms tends to produce an understanding of "care" as "female" and "security" as "male". Care, when free from the constraints of gender as a binary construct, can play an important role in revealing the depth of ethical-political concerns and help expand the understanding of security. By revisiting the (...)
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  24. S. Stremersch, N. M. A. Camacho, S. Vanneste & I. W. J. Verniers, Unraveling Scientific Impact.
    The number of citations a paper receives is the most commonly used measure of scientific impact. In this paper, we study not only the number but also the type of citations that 659 marketing articles generated. We discern five citation types: application, affirmation, negation, review and perfunctory mention. Prior literature in scientometrics recognizes that the former three types, on average, signal a higher level of scientific indebtedness than the latter two types. In our sample, these three types of citation represent (...)
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  25. I. P. Van Staveren & D. R. Gasper, Development as Freedom : Contributions and Shortcomings of Amartya Sen's Development Philosophy for Feminist Economics.
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  26. J. P. Mackenbach, Streets of Paris, Sunflower Seeds, and Nobel Prizes. Reflections on the Quantitative Paradigm of Public Health.
    Quantitative methods are central to public health and public health research. The historical roots and philosophical foundations of this predilection for the quantitative, however, are little known and seldom discussed.
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  27. S. Djunatan, The Principle of Affirmation: An Ontological and Epistemological Ground of Interculturality.
    I would like to begin my thesis with a general overview of a book on African sage philosophy (1990) written by the prominent African philosopher Henry Odera Oruka (1944-1995), My reading of this book on philosophic sagacity needs to be equipped by two underlying backgrounds of philosophic sagacity. The first background is a perspective of the intercultural philosophy. The second one explains of philosophic sagacity in the African setting.
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  28. R. Veenhoven & Z. Guoqing, Ancient Chinese Philosophical Advice: Can It Help Us Find Happiness Today?
    Confucianism, Buddhism and Taoism are three main classic Chinese philosophy schools, which all deal with the question of how one should live. In this paper we first review these ancient recommendations and next consider whether they promise a happy life in present day society. Recommended behaviours found in the ancient texts are compared with conditions for happiness as observed in present day empirical investigations. Classic Confucianism appears to offer the most apt advice for finding happiness in present day society, in (...)
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  29. R. Veenhoven, Does Happiness Matter?
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  30. L. Bungvane, Censorship of Philosophy in the Seventeenth-Century Dutch Republic.
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  31. M. L. Langdee, Moving Circles: Mobile Media and Playful Identities.
    The mobile phone has become part of our everyday lives with astonishing speed. Over four billion people now have access to mobile phones, and this number keeps increasing. Mobile media technologies shape how we communicate with each other, and relate to the world. This raises questions about their influence on identity. Medium-specific properties and user-practices challenge the idea that we understand ourselves through stories. It is proposed that the notion of play sheds new light on how technologies shape identities. The (...)
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  32. A. ThH Pruyn & A. Smidts, Customers' Reactions to Waiting: Effects of the Presence of 'Fellow Sufferers' in the Waiting Room.
    In a field experiment, Social Facilitation Theory (SFT) and Affiliation Theory (AT) were applied to waiting. SFT predicts the effects of 'waiting alone' or 'waiting with others' on the waiting experience. As predicted, when the wait is long, waiting with others makes it less acceptable. Under these conditions, waiting times are also less accurately estimated. AT prescribes the conditions under which one shows preference to wait with others; a preference which proves to be stronger when one feels anxious or uncertain (...)
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