OAI Archive: Flinders Academic Commons

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100 entries most recently downloaded from the archive "Flinders Academic Commons"

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  1. Mark Piccini, The Secret of the World Remains Hidden: Roberto Bolańo as an Antiliterary Author.
    The Chilean author Roberto Bolańo cultivated a contentious attitude to literature, believing that it conceals the fear and self-interest that coordinates its meaningfulness. For Bolańo, great writers should face the abyss of meaninglessness while standing tall, a directive which prohibits drawing conclusions that might ultimately be elevated to the level of fact. Instead, Bolańo commits to a category of truth that cannot be described by inscribing its contingent effects in his writing through what I will call his ‘antiliterature.’ Acknowledging this (...)
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  2. Subhendra Bhowmick & Anindya Sekhar Purakayastha, Tympanising Philosophy: Luxating the Disciplinary Margins Through a Derridean Reading of the Mahabharata.
    This paper argues for a coalition of ‘embattled adversaries’, namely philosophy and literature and it does that by referring to Derrida`s seminal work, Margins of Philosophy. To deepen our thesis about the alliance of philosophy and literature, we also allude to Indian philosophy and the great Indian philosophico-literary epic, the Mahabharata. Foundational Indian philosophic texts such as the Vedas and the Upanishads were articulated through poetic hymns which exude rich literary inflexions. This literary inscape of Indian philosophical texts testifies the (...)
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  3. Brian Medlin & Christine Vick, Mysticism and Stuff Like That: Introduction by Christine Vick.
    Essay on mysticism in poetry, the Australian bush, and a photo essay on the Coorong by Brian Medlin, with an introduction by his wife, Christine Vick.
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  4. Tasoula Kallenou, Performance and Philosophy Now.
    Was Plato the first philosophical dramatist to explore philosophical ideas through dramatic content, introducing dramatic structures currently in line with contemporary theatre? If Plato was an influential figure for philosophers as well as theatre-makers, it can arguably be said that he was a silent pioneer in creating the newly defined discipline of Performance Philosophy. There is an obvious polarity between performance and philosophy since both disciplines are on the quest of exploring and presenting what life is. At least this can (...)
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  5. Samuel Finegan, Adolescent Occultism and the Philosophy of Things in Three Novels.
    Shirley Jackson’s 1962 We Have Always Lived in the Castle, Iain Banks’s 1984 The Wasp Factory and Sonya Hartnett’s 2009 Butterfly are novels separated not only by decades, but by distance being produced in the United States, Scotland and Australia respectively. Despite this, each of these texts depicts a young adult in a mimetically recognisable world struggling to reconcile their intuitive occultism with that world. The mediation of magic through assemblages of charged objects creates a philosophy of things – modelling (...)
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  6. Andrew J. Turner, Aristotle, Potential and Actual, Conflicts.
    In The Metaphysics Book Theta, Chapter four, Aristotle claims that to state that “some X is possible but X will never be” is a mistake. In effect, he collapses the possible into the actual. This view conflicts with the existence of dispositions which I argue exist, as they are indispensable to science. In Theta Chapter three, Aristotle sets out a test of possibility whereby we assume that some entity exists and then see if an impossibility ensues. I apply this test (...)
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  7. Spyridon George Couvalis, Aristotle on Being: An Aristotelian Critique of Russell’s Theory of Existence.
    Aristotle explains existence through postulating essences that are intrinsic and perception independent. I argue that his theory is more plausible than Hume’s and Russell’s theories of existence. Russell modifies Hume’s theory because he wants to allow for the existence of mathematical objects. However, Russell’s theory facilitates a problematic collapse of ontology into epistemology, which has become a feature of much analytic philosophy. This collapse obscures the nature of truth. Aristotle is to be praised for starting with a clear account of (...)
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  8. Scott Mann, Ontology and Explanation.
    This paper critically assesses some recent attempts to develop and update the basic categories of Aristotle’s ontology, by Jonathan Lowe and Brian Ellis. It defends these attempts in face of criticisms by John Heil, while also addressing, and responding to, some possible weaknesses in Lowe and Ellis’s accounts. The paper defends Boyd’s idea of higher order kinds as homeostatic property clusters.
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  9. Kieran Nanasi, Philoponus and the Subtraction Argument.
    The subtraction argument for the existence of an empty world has been challenged in the case of where the world has an infinite number of objects. Drawing on the reconstruction of Philoponus’ traversal argument by George Couvalis. I argue that a subtraction argument based around time units can adequately deal with worlds that are inhabited by an infinite number of objects.
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  10. Peter Quigley, Aristotle and Real Possibility.
    Ross, Hintikka, Waterlow and Makin have all suggested that there is something problematic about Aristotle’s treatment of possibility. I will canvas their concerns and propose that the problem is not so much with Aristotle as the fact that the notion of possibility is not a single simple concept. I will present eight different components of the notion of possibility and suggest that Aristotle may have been aware of all of them. I will conclude whilst his treatment can appear inconsistent, it (...)
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  11. Rick Benitez, The Moral of the Story: On Fables and Philosophy in Plato's 'Symposium'.
    Scholars have puzzled over the fact that Plato’s criticisms of poetry are themselves contained in mimetic works. This paper sheds light on that phenomenon by examining an analogous one. The Symposium contains one fable which is criticised by means of another which is thought to represent Plato’s own view. Diotima’s fable, however, is suspended within a larger narrative that invites us to examine and question it. The Symposium thus affords opportunity to observe Plato’s criticisms of a genre and the qualifications (...)
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  12. Jonathan Paul Marshall, Plato and Gorgias Walk Into a Symposium.
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