OAI Archive: University of Brighton Repository

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100 entries most recently downloaded from the archive "University of Brighton Repository"

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  1. G. McFee, Woolheim, Richard Arthur (1923-2003).
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  2. Graham McFee, Wollheim on Expression (and Representation).
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  3. Graham McFee, Right Reason: Searching for Truth in the Sport and Exercise Sciences.
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  4. Graham McFee, Art, Understanding and Historical Character: A Contribution to Analytic Aesthetics.
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  5. Graham Mcfee, Wittgenstein and the Arts: Understanding and Performing.
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  6. Graham McFee, Art, Essence and Wittgenstein.
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  7. Graham McFee, It's Not a Game: The Place of Philosophy in the Study of Sport.
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  8. Graham McFee, Ethical Considerations and Voluntary Informed Consent in Research in Sport.
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  9. Graham McFee, Cognitivism and Dance Experience.
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  10. Graham McFee, Artistic Value: Its Scope and Limits (and a Little Something About Sport).
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  11. Claudia Kappenberg, Exhausting the Screen.
    During the 2007 OSVD conference at Findhorn, Scotland a working group formulated a manifesto on screendance with the proposition that “through an accretion of images of bodies in motion, a larger truth may unfold’. Written a year later this paper revisits the manifesto and discusses its propositions in the light of André Lepecki’s recent publication Exhausting Dance. In accordance with Lepecki the paper draws on Sloterdijk’s notion of a kinetic excess of modernity and argues that current screendance practice colludes with (...)
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  12. Bob Brecher, The "Ticking Bomb": A Spurious Argument for Torture.
    The so-called ticking bomb is invoked by philosophers and lawyers trying to justify, on behalf of their political masters, the use of torture in extremis. I show that the scenario is spurious; and that the likely consequences of the use of interrogational torture in such cases are disastrous. Finally, I test the argument against a real case.
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  13. Bob Brecher, Academic Freedom.
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  14. Bob Brecher, Why Torture is Wrong.
    Even people who think torture is justified in certain circumstances regard it - to say the least - as undesirable, however necessary they think it is. So I approach the issue by analysing the extreme case where people such as Dershowitz, Posner and Walzer think torture is justified, the so-called ticking bomb scenario. And since the justification offered is always consequentialist - no one thinks that torture is in any way “good in itself” – I confine myself to consequentialist arguments. (...)
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  15. Bob Brecher, Pornography: Men Possessing Women. A Reassessment.
    For a few years in the 1980s, Andrea Dworkin’s Pornography: Men Possessing Women appeared to have changed the intellectual landscape – as well as some people’s lives. Pornography, she argued, not only constitutes violence against women; it constitutes also the main conduit for such violence, of which rape is at once the prime example and the central image. In short, it is patriarchy’s most powerful weapon. Given that, feminists’ single most important task is to deal with pornography. By the early (...)
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  16. Bob Brecher, The Politics of Humanism.
    This chapter argues against Frank Furedi’s urging of a ‘pre-political’ humanism. Having considered the possible bases of appeals to "human nature" as a starting-point for political claims, I argue that, unless we already have a pre-existent non- or anti-humanist commitment, the movement in appeals to "human nature" is from our philosophical/political commitment to our view of it. But since that is precisely what the call for a pre-political humanism opposes, it founders on two difficulties. First, in what sense might a (...)
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  17. Bob Brecher, 'In its Own Image': Neo-Liberalism and the Managerialist University.
    I argue that neo-liberalism requires a managerialist view of our universities; and to the extent that managerialism cannot be ameliorated, to that extent neo-liberalism signals the end of universities as places of learning. Rather than calling for “friendlier” management practice, we need to organise opposition by articulating and rallying around some vision of what the ends should be of the university, and which managing such an institution should therefore serve. Such a vision, whatever exactly its details might consist in, would (...)
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  18. Bob Brecher (2011). Which Values? And Whose? A Reply to Fulford. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 17 (5):996-998.
    Fulford’s discussion of ‘values-based practice’ as a model for medical ethics is deeply puzzling. First, it remains unclear what exactly he takes values to be or how tyhey can be based in clinical skills. Second, his proposal does not make it clear whose values these are supposed to be. I conclude that his attempt in effect to take the morality out of ethics fails.
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  19. Bob Brecher (2007). Torture and the Ticking Bomb. Wiley-Blackwell.
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  20. Bob Brecher, Torture: A Touchstone for Global Social Justice.
    This chapter considers the wider significance of torture, addressing the manner in which it represents a touchstone for any universalistic morality, and arguing that it offers a means of refuting any moral relativism, something that ties in closely with my long-term theoretical work in metaethics (eg Getting What You Want? A Critique of Liberal Morality (Routledge: London and New York, 1998; and ongoing work around the ultimate justification of morality). Since torture consists in the erasure of a person on the (...)
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  21. Bob Brecher, Communitarianism: The Practice of Postmodern Liberalism.
    The chapter argues that communitarianism is the ‘postmodern bourgeois liberalism’ that Rorty, probably the leading avowedly epistemological, rather than political, or merely political, communitarian, describes himself as espousing. Proceeding by way of a detailed discussion of Philip Selznick’s definitive ‘Social Justice: a Communitarian Perspective’-- in which he seeks ‘to reaffirm, and to clarify if I can, the communitarian commitment to social justice’ -- I show that rooted in the particular as communitarianism is, it cannot but reflect the values, beliefs and (...)
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  22. Bob Brecher, Interrogation, Intelligence and Ill-Treatment: Lessons From Northern Ireland, 1971-72.
    In 2008, Samantha Newbery, then a PhD student, discovered a hitherto confidential document: ‘Confidential: UK Eyes Only. Annex A: Intelligence gained from interrogations in Northern Ireland’ (DEFE 13/958, The National Archives (TNA)). It details the British Army’s notorious interrogations of IRA suspects that led to the eventual banning of the ‘five techniques’ that violated the UK’s international treaty obligation prohibiting the use of torture and ‘inhuman or degrading treatment or punishment’. Having decided that the document – Intelligence gained from should (...)
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  23. Mark Devenney, The Limits of Communicative Rationality and Deliberative Democracy.
    This article develops a critique of Jurgen Habermas's account of communicative rationality. Habermas argues that communication harbours an implicit promise, that it is underpinned by a a claim to be valid which is in principle subject to verification. A close reading of Habermas's badic theoretical decisions demosntrates what communicative rationality occludes in the study of language. Habermas sidelines concerns about the ineliminable power underlying any communication, and occludes any focus on the slipperiness of meaning. The critique has implications for the (...)
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  24. Joanna Jody Boehnert, Epistemological Error and Converging Crises: A Whole Systems View.
    Gregory Bateson said that we are ‘governed by epistemologies that we know to be wrong’ back in 1972. In the same book Bateson wrote: 'the organism that destroys its environment destroys itself.’ Almost forty years later global ecological systems are in steep decline and converging crises make a deep evaluation of the underlying premises of our philosophical traditions an urgent imperative. This paper will suggest that the roots of the economic crisis are epistemological and that to correct this error whole (...)
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  25. Julie Doyle & Katrina Roen, Introduction: Surgery and Embodiment - Carving Out Subjects.
    This is an introduction to the Special Issue: ‘Surgery and Embodiment: Carving out Subjects’. The collection of articles in the special issue demonstrates how surgery, as a set of discourses and practices, has become central to the mediation between body and psyche in cultural understandings and individual experiences of embodied subjectivity. This is achieved by examining, from a variety of disciplinary perspectives, a range of historical and contemporary examples of surgical practice. The contributors share common concerns about embodied subjectivity, gender (...)
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  26. Emma Bell, Fame.
    Discussion of philosophy, celebrity and gender; review of Mark Rowlands' 2008 book on philosophy and Fame.
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  27. Emma Bell, Imagine Madness: Madness, Revolution, Ressentiment and Critical Theory.
    This paper focuses on a short passage by Nietzsche on the reciprocity between revolution and madness: ‘those men irresistibly drawn to throw off the yoke of any kind of morality and to frame new laws had, if they were not actually mad, no alternative but to make themselves or pretend to be mad’ (Daybreak, §I:14) The paper explores how from romanticism, through avant-gardism, to contemporary critical theory, some who sought to ‘make it new’ have willed madness as a means of (...)
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