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100 entries most recently downloaded from the archive "University of Brighton Repository"

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  1. Zoe Sutherland, The World as Gallery: Conceptualism and Global Neo-Avant-Garde.
    This article examines recent claims that conceptual art was the first truly global art form, by analysing its material circuits of production, exhibition and distribution. Undertaking a close analysis of artistic developments in various regions of the world in the postwar era, it seeks to show that existing narratives—either that conceptual art was specific to US and Europe, or that it was a 'spontaneously global' phenomenon—are both reductive. Instead, conceptual art is redefined as the crystallisation and institutionalisation of an already (...)
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  2. Nigel Foxcroft, En la Vorágine de la Imaginación Romántica de Malcolm Lowry: La Expiación de La Mordida.
    This updated paper - translated into Mexican Spanish - analyses Malcolm Lowry, La Mordida in terms of its provision of redemption and atonement for the debts of the past. It also traces various English, European, and American literary influences on Lowry's novel, as well as that of Walter Benjamin.
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  3. Luke Pendrell, Haunters and the Haunted.
    If, as Derrida supposes, each era creates its own ghosts, we live in extraordinarily creative times. Our rational, technological world is populated with more phantoms than ever. We are paralysed in a frozen now, smothered by the massed murmurings of the past, stalked by the angry revenants of forgotten radicals and the awful twins of a future, that is at once inconceivable and yetinevitable. In this, final, session of the current Speculative Tate seminars, we take a spectral turn to explore (...)
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  4. Aakanksha Virkar-Yates, An Objective Chemistry: What T. S. Eliot Borrowed From Schopenhauer.
    “Tradition and the Individual Talent” is T. S. Eliot's expression of his poetics of impersonality, a spirited rejection of romantic subjectivism and emotionalism. But could Eliot's modernist essay be derived in part from what he presents as the unremittingly “emotional” philosophy of Schopenhauer? Section 51 of Schopenhauer's The World as Will and Representation I presents a metaphor resoundingly familiar to modern readers: the chemistry of verse-writing. A closer examination of “Tradition” and “Hamlet and his Problems” betrays Schopenhauer's unacknowledged role in (...)
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  5. Aakanksha Virkar-Yates, Absolute Music and the Death of Desire: Beethoven, Schopenhauer, Wagner and Eliot's Four Quartets.
    The influence of Beethoven on Eliot's Four Quartets is mediated by Wagner and Schopenhauer and relates fundamentally to the philosopher's understanding of instrumental music as expressing a universalised and abstract emotion. Schopenhauer's aesthetics are intimately connected with Wagner's treatment of the idea of absolute music – a discussion that begins in his early prose writings and culminates in his essay 'Beethoven'. At the origin of Wagner's thinking about absolute music is a striking metaphor: that of Beethoven as Columbus, exploring the (...)
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  6. Clare Woodford, From Nora to the BNP: Implications of Cavell’s Critique of Rawls.
    This article examines Cavell's critique of Rawlsian citizenship, namely that Rawls’ desire to seek a democratic way of life in which citizens can reassure themselves that their behaviour has been ‘above reproach’ reflects a distorted and hence inadequate conception of the demands of the moral life. Although the aim to be ‘above reproach’ was only expressed in Rawls’ ‘A Theory of Justice’, I extend Stephen Mulhall's work to show that Cavell's concern holds not only for Rawls’ ‘Political Liberalism’ but also (...)
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  7. Alec Grant, Living My Narrative: Storying Dishonesty and Deception in Mental Health Nursing.
    This paper proceeds from MacIntyre’s moral philosophical perspective of individual human lives constituting unified narratives, in the context of co-evolving framing and guiding master narratives. This perspective accords specific episodes in people’s lives the status of significant component parts of their developing, storied and enacted individual histories. From this philosophical base, autoethnographic principles will be employed in providing accounts from my own professional life narrative strand as a mental health nurse educator that speak to the issue of institutionalised dishonesty and (...)
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  8. Mark Abel, Chord Symbols, Musical Abstraction and Modernism.
    This article traces the emergence of the chord symbol in twentieth century musical notation, and discusses its significance both for musical aesthetics and for the development of new musical practices. Using Adorno as a reference point, Abel argues that despite being a product of a reified and conservative conception of musical language, the abstraction involved in the chord symbol has provided the basis for radically new forms of music-making which indicate ways in which the individualistic and hierarchical priorities of the (...)
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  9. Ben Sweeting, The Implicit Ethics of Designing.
    The relationship between ethics and design is most usually thought of in terms of applied ethics. There are, however, difficulties with this: for instance, conventional ethical stances such as deontology or consequentialism depend on procedures that are inapplicable in the sorts of complex situations which designers commonly face. In any case, it is not as if ethics is a settled body of theory that can act as an authority with which to guide practice. Depending on which theories we refer to, (...)
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  10. Ben Sweeting, Conversation, Design and Ethics: The Cybernetics of Ranulph Glanville.
    One of the major themes of Ranulph Glanville's work has been the intimate connection between cybernetics and design, the two principle disciplines that he has worked in and contributed to. In this paper I review the significance of the analogy that he proposes between the two and its connection to his concerns with, firstly, the cybernetic practice of cybernetics and, secondly, the relation between cybernetics and ethics. I propose that by putting the cybernetics-design analogy together with the idea that in (...)
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  11. Ben Sweeting, Cybernetics of Practice.
    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to explore ways in which cybernetics leads to distinctive ways of acting. Design/methodology/approach – Paralleling von Foerster’s argument that it makes more sense to speak of the cybernetics of epistemology than the epistemology of cybernetics, the author argues that cybernetics is not one form of practice amongst others but an account of what it is to practice, understood as where we relate how we act to how we understand so that each informs (...)
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  12. Michael Hohl & Ben Sweeting, Composing Conferences.
    The design of academic conferences, in which settings ideas are shared and created, is, we suggest, of more than passing interest in constructivism, where epistemology is considered in terms of knowing rather than knowledge. The passivity and predominantly one-way structure of the typical paper presentation format of academic conferences has a number of serious limitations from a constructivist perspective, which are both practical and epistemological. While alternative formats abound, there is nevertheless increasing pressure reinforcing this format due to delegates’ funding (...)
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  13. Luke Pendrell, The Shape of the Void.
    Geographies and the territories that opportunistically spring up to inhabit them, populate their landscapes and exploit their riches are merely superficial manifestations of more substratal tendencies of movement. What appears stable and static is, in fact, volatile, mutable, unstable. Coastal erosion, whether attributed to climate change or less anthropocene causes, can be read as a hyper-accelerated manifestation of geological time on a human scale. The processes of geological change, measured out in millennia and thus ordinarily imperceptible to the evanescent oscillations (...)
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  14. Nigel Foxcroft, Visions of History: Chance and Certainty in A. S. Pushkin’s The Bronze Horseman and Boris Godunov.
    This paper advances the findings of Alexander Dolinin and Svetlana Evdokhimova relating to A. S. Pushkin’s view of history by advocating the significance of a combination of irrational with rational elements in charting history. In both Boris Godunov and The Bronze Horseman, Pushkin provides visions of history in which the forces of chance and certainty are key factors in determining the course of Russia’s rise to great power status. Influenced by Shakespearian tragedy and by N. M. Karamzin’s History of the (...)
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  15. John Wrighton, Reading Responsibly Between Martha Nussbaum and Emmanuel Levinas: Towards a Textual Ethics for the Twenty-First Century.
    This article explores the intersection of literature and philosophy in order to present a reworked textual ethics for the twenty-first century. Tracing over the last thirty years a remarkable philosophical engagement with the ethical imperative of literary criticism, the “turn to ethics” it is argued has largely settled into two competing critical camps: a neo-Aristotelian, narrative ethics on the one hand, and an other-oriented, deconstructive ethics on the other. But by bringing into productive tension for the first time the major (...)
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  16. Nigel Foxcroft, Dynamic Conflict in Alexander Pushkin’s Boris Godunov and The Bronze Horseman.
    Alexander Pushkin deals with crucial turning-points in the rise of Russia in Boris Godunov and The Bronze Horseman . In the former he is influenced not only by Shakespearian drama, but also by N. M. Karamzin’s History of the Russian State . Without simply recreating Russia’s past, he challenges the ideas of the Enlightenment and the Romantic Movement, identifying rational and irrational forces at work and linking the present with the past through the use of historicisms. In The Bronze Horseman (...)
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  17. Mark Abel, Groove: An Aesthetic of Measured Time.
    What is the relationship between music and time? How does musical rhythm express our social experience of time? InGroove: An Aesthetic of Measured Time, Mark Abel explains the rise to prominence in Western music of a new way of organising rhythm: groove. He provides a historical account of its emergence around the turn of the twentieth century, and analyses the musical components which make it work.Tracing the influence of key philosophical arguments about the nature of time on musical aesthetics, Mark (...)
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  18. Nigel Foxcroft, The Influence of Mexican and Russian Civilizations on Malcolm Lowry’s Shamanic Perceptions.
    This study of shamanic and psychogeographic influences on the work of Malcolm Lowry considers psychological, anthropological, and ethnographic forces - cultural, social, and linguistic. It elucidates Lowry’s complex mind-set and examines East-West cross-cultural and historical factors. The impact of Sir James Frazer’s ethnographic research and of the actions of Hernán Cortés on Aztec civilization is discussed, as reflected in the novel, Under the Volcano , set in Mexico on the Día de Muertos, or Day of the Dead. The way in (...)
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  19. B. Simpson & Nicholas Marshall, The Mutuality of Emotions and Learning in Organizations.
    The interplay between emotion and learning is a continuing source of debate and inquiry in organization studies, attracting an increasing number of important contributions. However, a detailed understanding of the interaction between emotion and learning remains elusive. In an effort to extend the existing debate, this article offers an alternative approach that draws on the tradition of pragmatist philosophy, where emotion and learning can both be defined as dynamic processes that emerge in the relational context of social transactions. The mutually (...)
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  20. Nigel Foxcroft, Foxcroft Presenta Ante Público Morelense Sus Investigaciones.
    This paper evaluates the nature and significance of Nigel Foxcroft’s current research into the worldview of the late Modernist writer, Malcolm Lowry by considering the latter’s search for new ways of understanding the world, based on his ideas relating to the soul. In considering various influences on his life and work, it highlights the theme of shamanism and the relationship between Lowry’s creative mind and the cosmological concepts held by the indigenous peoples of Mexico, such as the Aztec and Zapotec (...)
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  21. Nigel Foxcroft, Shamanic Psyche of Malcom Lowry: An Intercontinental Odyssey.
    This article provides a multi-disciplinary framework for an ongoing inter-disciplinary research project analyzing the influence of social, linguistic, ethnographic, and shamanic forces on human psychology in Malcolm Lowry’s works, as evidenced by his ‘landscape of memory’ publications, such as Under the Volcano and Dark as the Grave Wherein My Friend is Laid. It investigates his perception of psychogeographic impact on the Aztec mind in the context of the Day of the Dead festival in Mexico and his fascination with different cultures (...)
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  22. Nigel Foxcroft, Malcolm Lowry and the Day of the Dead - an Escape to Aztec Civilization?
    Malcolm Lowry’s semi-autobiographical modernist novel, Under the Volcano journeys us back to the Day of the Dead in Cuernavaca in November 1938. How does this vibrant and colourful Mexican festival link an actual geographical place with the metaphysical, spiritual, and cosmic spaces of the mind? To what extent does this ‘landscape of memory’ illustrate a clash between ancient Aztec civilizations and modern Latin American culture? What are the advantages and disadvantages of a psychoanalytic perception of psychogeographic impact? Do mankind’s supernatural (...)
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  23. Bob Brecher, Do Intellectuals Have a Special Public Responsibility?
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  24. Claudia Kappenberg, Film as Poetry.
    Over the last few years several essays have been published which include a comparison of Deren’s concept of vertical and horizontal film form with Deleuze’s theory of movement-image and time-image; for example, Annette Michelson’s and Renata Jackson’s essays in Maya Deren and The American Avant-garde and Erin Brannigan’s discussion of Deren’s work in Dancefilm . Given the tentative nature of their comparison this essay will undertake a more systematic review of the relation between film and language which underpins Deren’s and (...)
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  25. Claudia Kappenberg, Abandoning to Worklessness.
    David Hinton and Sue Davis go back to the beginnings of cinema in All This Can Happen. A fascination with movement, the desire to understand movement - and stillness - was also at the heart of the work of photographers like Etienne-Jules Marey and Muybridge and filmmakers like Dziga Vertov and is central to All This Can Happen. This paper discusses how the still, which is held on screen, replayed and multiplied, and then released, invite the viewer to watch, to (...)
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  26. Thomas-Bernard Kenniff & Ben Sweeting, There Is No Alibi in Designing: Responsibility and Dialogue in the Design Process.
    This paper explores a potential relation between architecture and ethics intrinsic to design processes when understood in terms of dialogue or conversation. We draw on separate but related research interests: one focused on the design process, especially the significance of drawing, and the other on the ethics of designing for the public realm, with reference to Bakhtinian dialogism. Our investigation concentrates on two aspects of the design process both of which can be thought of in terms of conversation – first, (...)
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  27. Rebecca Bramall, Book Review: Theories of Memory: A Reader. [REVIEW]
    A review of Theories of Memory: A Reader, edited by Michael Rossington and Anne Whitehead.
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  28. Nigel Foxcroft, Shamanic Influences on Malcolm Lowry: East-West Connections.
    This paper investigates various psychological, psychogeographical, and anthropological forces - cultural, social, and linguistic – bearing on Malcolm Lowry’s works. With its focus on the influence of nineteenth-century Russian literature upon his creative mind, it examines East-West cross-cultural and historical factors and their implications for the ‘ascent of man’. It explores the impact of Sir James Frazer’s ethnographic research and of Hernán Cortés, the Spanish conquistador, upon Aztec civilization, as reflected in Lowry’s novel, Under the Volcano, set in Mexico on (...)
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  29. Bob Brecher, Complicity and Modularization: How Universities Were Made Safe for the Market.
    Education has always occupied a contradictory position in society, expected to ensure compliance and continuity and yet to encourage critique and renewal. Since the early 1980s, however, successive UK governments have directly mobilised education, and higher education in particular, as an ideological tool in the task of embedding neo-liberalism as ‘common sense’. Modularisation has been in the vanguard, first in the universities, more latterly at secondary level. The effect has been disastrous: here as elsewhere, choice has become depressingly fetishised; knowledge, (...)
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  30. Bob Brecher (2008). Torture and the Ticking Bomb. Wiley-Blackwell.
    This timely and passionate book is the first to address itself to Harvard Law Professor Alan Dershowitz’s controversial arguments for the limited use of interrogational torture and its legalisation. Argues that the respectability Dershowitz's arguments confer on the view that torture is a legitimate weapon in the war on terror needs urgently to be countered Takes on the advocates of torture on their own utilitarian grounds Timely and passionately written, in an accessible, jargon-free style Forms part of the provocative and (...)
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  31. Robert Brecher, Transgenerational Obligations: 21st Century Germany and the Holocaust.
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  32. Robert Brecher, Do Intellectuals Have a Special Public Responsibility?
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  33. Bob Brecher, The Holocaust.
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  34. Michael Neu, The Fragility of Justified Warfare: A Comment on Steinhoff.
    In this essay I evaluate Uwe Steinhoff’s arguments for “The Moral Equality of Modern Combatants and the Myth of Justified War.” I introduce, and briefly explore, several ways of critiquing Steinhoff’s claim that combatants fighting on two sides of a war have an equal liberty-right to kill each other even if one side is fighting a justified war and the other is not. Moreover, I contend that Steinhoff’s thesis about the myth of justified war, despite being too strong, does not (...)
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  35. Nicholas Marshall, The Uncertain Ethics of Organisational Knowing: Meaning and Politics in the Pragmatist Tradition.
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  36. Nigel Foxcroft, From Russia to Eridanus: The Taoist Psychogeographic Ecosphere of Malcolm Lowry.
    In tracing the evolution of the cosmic consciousness of Malcolm Lowry , a prominently significant English Modernist novelist and poet, this paper provides a multi-disciplinary, cross-cultural, intercontinental framework for analysing the influence of cultures and civilizations - both east and west – upon national identity, as expressed through literature. In its investigation of the material and spiritual domains of the Aztecs and Oaxacan Zapotecs, it considers anthropological, cultural, and ethnographic influences associated with pre-Columbian, Mesoamerican rituals. Hence, it scrutinizes the psychogeographic (...)
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  37. Irene Gammel & John Wrighton, “Arabesque Grotesque”: Toward a Theory of Dada Ecopoetics.
    While modernism and its avant-garde are often excluded from studies of environmental or ecological concerns, associated mostly with modern technologies, urban life and expanding media, this essay in contrast proposes that the arc that culminates in postmodern ecopoetics extends backwards to WWI-era Dada ecology. Using as a case study the body poetics of German-born New York Dada poet Elsa von Freytag-Loringhoven, this study advances a theory of Dada ecopoetics, exploring a number of crucial themes such as a radical dismantling of (...)
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  38. Nigel Foxcroft, The Power of Non-Verbal Communication in J. M. Coetzee’s Foe.
    J. M. Coetzee’s Foe has been heralded as a record of the trajectory of the English novel and as a postcolonial retelling of Daniel Defoe’s Robinson Crusoe . It is also a testament both to the power and, ironically, to the latent limitations of language - language as an expression of truth and as the antithesis of silence. With the sleight-of-hand of a magician, the wordsmith is seen as being divinely inspired. Logocentrism is considered as a challenge to phonocentrism. However, (...)
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  39. Nigel Foxcroft, Psychogeographic Impact on Malcolm Lowry's Consciousness: From the Zapotec and Aztec Civilizations to Taoism.
    This paper provides an intercontinental, cross-cultural, multi-disciplinary framework for an analysis of the influence of cultures and civilizations - both east and west – upon literature and national identity. It investigates the evolution of the cosmic consciousness of the English Modernist novelist and poet, Malcolm Lowry by scrutinizing the psychogeographic and subconscious dimensions of the Mexican Day of the Dead Hispanic festival which he observed in Cuernavaca in 1936. In its analysis of the material and spiritual domains of both the (...)
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  40. Rebecca Bramall, Dig for Victory! Anti-Consumerism, Austerity, and New Historical Subjectivities.
    In recent years, austerity-related discourses have become a popular means of imagining and promoting more sustainable living. This article situates the re-emergence of the slogan ‘dig for victory’ in the wider discursive formation of ‘anti-consumerism’, and explores the relationship between the ‘defetishizing’ qualities of commodity histories and the constitution of ethico-political consuming subjects. Following Laclau’s notion that a conversion of subjectivity results from persuasion, I suggest that the persuasiveness of ‘dig for victory’ lies in its insistence upon historical solutions to (...)
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  41. Nigel Foxcroft, Souls and Shamans in Space: The Cosmopolitan, Prismatic Psychology of Malcolm Lowry.
    In reinterpreting his vision of the world, this paper investigates international influences – especially Russian literary sources mentioned in his letters – on the multicultural, cosmic mindset of the English Modernist novelist, Malcolm Lowry . It assesses the psychological, psychogeographic and ethnographic forces at work in his approach to Jacob Bronowski’s ensuing Ascent of Man. In doing so, it analyses how Aztec and Zapotec anthropological, shamanic, and cabbalistic factors impact upon a psychological reading of Under the Volcano and Dark as (...)
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  42. Graham McFee, Woolheim, Richard Arthur.
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  43. Graham McFee, Wollheim on Expression (and Representation).
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  44. Graham McFee, Right Reason: Searching for Truth in the Sport and Exercise Sciences.
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  45. Graham McFee, Art, Understanding and Historical Character: A Contribution to Analytic Aesthetics.
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  46. Graham Mcfee, Wittgenstein and the Arts: Understanding and Performing.
  47. Graham McFee, Art, Essence and Wittgenstein.
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  48. Graham McFee, It's Not a Game: The Place of Philosophy in the Study of Sport.
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  49. Graham McFee, Ethical Considerations and Voluntary Informed Consent in Research in Sport.
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  50. Graham McFee, Cognitivism and Dance Experience.
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  51. Graham McFee, Artistic Value: Its Scope and Limits (and a Little Something About Sport).
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  52. Claudia Kappenberg, Exhausting the Screen.
    During the 2007 OSVD conference at Findhorn, Scotland a working group formulated a manifesto on screendance with the proposition that “through an accretion of images of bodies in motion, a larger truth may unfold’. Written a year later this paper revisits the manifesto and discusses its propositions in the light of André Lepecki’s recent publication Exhausting Dance. In accordance with Lepecki the paper draws on Sloterdijk’s notion of a kinetic excess of modernity and argues that current screendance practice colludes with (...)
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  53. Bob Brecher, The "Ticking Bomb": A Spurious Argument for Torture.
    The so-called ticking bomb is invoked by philosophers and lawyers trying to justify, on behalf of their political masters, the use of torture in extremis. I show that the scenario is spurious; and that the likely consequences of the use of interrogational torture in such cases are disastrous. Finally, I test the argument against a real case.
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  54. Bob Brecher, Academic Freedom.
  55. Bob Brecher, Why Torture is Wrong.
    Even people who think torture is justified in certain circumstances regard it - to say the least - as undesirable, however necessary they think it is. So I approach the issue by analysing the extreme case where people such as Dershowitz, Posner and Walzer think torture is justified, the so-called ticking bomb scenario. And since the justification offered is always consequentialist - no one thinks that torture is in any way “good in itself” – I confine myself to consequentialist arguments. (...)
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  56. Bob Brecher, Pornography: Men Possessing Women. A Reassessment.
    For a few years in the 1980s, Andrea Dworkin’s Pornography: Men Possessing Women appeared to have changed the intellectual landscape – as well as some people’s lives. Pornography, she argued, not only constitutes violence against women; it constitutes also the main conduit for such violence, of which rape is at once the prime example and the central image. In short, it is patriarchy’s most powerful weapon. Given that, feminists’ single most important task is to deal with pornography. By the early (...)
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  57. Bob Brecher, The Politics of Humanism.
    This chapter argues against Frank Furedi’s urging of a ‘pre-political’ humanism. Having considered the possible bases of appeals to "human nature" as a starting-point for political claims, I argue that, unless we already have a pre-existent non- or anti-humanist commitment, the movement in appeals to "human nature" is from our philosophical/political commitment to our view of it. But since that is precisely what the call for a pre-political humanism opposes, it founders on two difficulties. First, in what sense might a (...)
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  58. Bob Brecher, 'In its Own Image': Neo-Liberalism and the Managerialist University.
    I argue that neo-liberalism requires a managerialist view of our universities; and to the extent that managerialism cannot be ameliorated, to that extent neo-liberalism signals the end of universities as places of learning. Rather than calling for “friendlier” management practice, we need to organise opposition by articulating and rallying around some vision of what the ends should be of the university, and which managing such an institution should therefore serve. Such a vision, whatever exactly its details might consist in, would (...)
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  59. Bob Brecher (2011). Which Values? And Whose? A Reply to Fulford. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 17 (5):996-998.
    Fulford’s discussion of ‘values-based practice’ as a model for medical ethics is deeply puzzling. First, it remains unclear what exactly he takes values to be or how tyhey can be based in clinical skills. Second, his proposal does not make it clear whose values these are supposed to be. I conclude that his attempt in effect to take the morality out of ethics fails.
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  60. Bob Brecher, Torture: A Touchstone for Global Social Justice.
    This chapter considers the wider significance of torture, addressing the manner in which it represents a touchstone for any universalistic morality, and arguing that it offers a means of refuting any moral relativism, something that ties in closely with my long-term theoretical work in metaethics (eg Getting What You Want? A Critique of Liberal Morality (Routledge: London and New York, 1998; and ongoing work around the ultimate justification of morality). Since torture consists in the erasure of a person on the (...)
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  61. Bob Brecher (2007). Torture and the Ticking Bomb. Wiley-Blackwell.
    We live in times when, as Conor Gearty has pointed out, ‘legal scholars in the US are being taken seriously when they float the idea of torture warrants as a reform to what they see as the unacceptably uncodified system of arbitrary torture that they believe currently prevails’. And he is right when he goes on to add that ‘This is like reacting to a series of police killings with proposals to reform the law on homicide so as to sanction (...)
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  62. Bob Brecher, Communitarianism: The Practice of Postmodern Liberalism.
    The chapter argues that communitarianism is the ‘postmodern bourgeois liberalism’ that Rorty, probably the leading avowedly epistemological, rather than political, or merely political, communitarian, describes himself as espousing. Proceeding by way of a detailed discussion of Philip Selznick’s definitive ‘Social Justice: a Communitarian Perspective’-- in which he seeks ‘to reaffirm, and to clarify if I can, the communitarian commitment to social justice’ -- I show that rooted in the particular as communitarianism is, it cannot but reflect the values, beliefs and (...)
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  63. Bob Brecher, Interrogation, Intelligence and Ill-Treatment: Lessons From Northern Ireland, 1971-72.
    In 2008, Samantha Newbery, then a PhD student, discovered a hitherto confidential document: ‘Confidential: UK Eyes Only. Annex A: Intelligence gained from interrogations in Northern Ireland’ (DEFE 13/958, The National Archives (TNA)). It details the British Army’s notorious interrogations of IRA suspects that led to the eventual banning of the ‘five techniques’ that violated the UK’s international treaty obligation prohibiting the use of torture and ‘inhuman or degrading treatment or punishment’. Having decided that the document – Intelligence gained from should (...)
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  64. Mark Devenney, The Limits of Communicative Rationality and Deliberative Democracy.
    This article develops a critique of Jurgen Habermas's account of communicative rationality. Habermas argues that communication harbours an implicit promise, that it is underpinned by a a claim to be valid which is in principle subject to verification. A close reading of Habermas's badic theoretical decisions demosntrates what communicative rationality occludes in the study of language. Habermas sidelines concerns about the ineliminable power underlying any communication, and occludes any focus on the slipperiness of meaning. The critique has implications for the (...)
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  65. Joanna Jody Boehnert, Epistemological Error and Converging Crises: A Whole Systems View.
    Gregory Bateson said that we are ‘governed by epistemologies that we know to be wrong’ back in 1972. In the same book Bateson wrote: 'the organism that destroys its environment destroys itself.’ Almost forty years later global ecological systems are in steep decline and converging crises make a deep evaluation of the underlying premises of our philosophical traditions an urgent imperative. This paper will suggest that the roots of the economic crisis are epistemological and that to correct this error whole (...)
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  66. Julie Doyle & Katrina Roen, Introduction: Surgery and Embodiment - Carving Out Subjects.
    This is an introduction to the Special Issue: ‘Surgery and Embodiment: Carving out Subjects’. The collection of articles in the special issue demonstrates how surgery, as a set of discourses and practices, has become central to the mediation between body and psyche in cultural understandings and individual experiences of embodied subjectivity. This is achieved by examining, from a variety of disciplinary perspectives, a range of historical and contemporary examples of surgical practice. The contributors share common concerns about embodied subjectivity, gender (...)
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  67. Emma Bell, Fame.
    Discussion of philosophy, celebrity and gender; review of Mark Rowlands' 2008 book on philosophy and Fame.
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  68. Emma Bell, Imagine Madness: Madness, Revolution, Ressentiment and Critical Theory.
    This paper focuses on a short passage by Nietzsche on the reciprocity between revolution and madness: ‘those men irresistibly drawn to throw off the yoke of any kind of morality and to frame new laws had, if they were not actually mad, no alternative but to make themselves or pretend to be mad’ (Daybreak, §I:14) The paper explores how from romanticism, through avant-gardism, to contemporary critical theory, some who sought to ‘make it new’ have willed madness as a means of (...)
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