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Forthcoming articles
  1. Jonas Åkerman (forthcoming). Infelicitous Cancellation: The Explicit Cancellability Test for Conversational Implicature Revisited. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-10.
    This paper questions the adequacy of the explicit cancellability test for conversational implicature as it is commonly understood. The standard way of understanding this test relies on two assumptions: First, that one can test whether a certain content is (merely) conversationally implicated by checking whether that content is cancellable, and second, that a cancellation is successful only if it results in a felicitous utterance. While I accept the first of these assumptions, I reject the second one. I argue that a (...)
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  2. Chad Carmichael (forthcoming). Toward a Commonsense Answer to the Special Composition Question. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-16.
    The special composition question is the question ‘When do some things compose something?’ The answers to this question in the literature have largely been at odds with common sense, either by allowing that any two things (no matter how apparently unrelated) compose something, or by denying the existence of most ordinary composite objects. I propose a new “series-style” answer to the special composition question that accords much more closely with common sense, and I defend this answer from van Inwagen’s objections. (...)
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  3. Charles B. Cross (forthcoming). A Logical Transmission Principle for Conclusive Reasons. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-18.
    Dretske's conclusive reasons account of knowledge is designed to explain how epistemic closure can fail when the evidence for a belief does not transmit to some of that belief's logical consequences. Critics of Dretske dispute the argument against closure while joining Dretske in writing off transmission. This paper shows that, in the most widely accepted system for counterfactual logic , conclusive reasons are governed by an informative, non-trivial, logical transmission principle. If r is a conclusive reason for believing p in (...)
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  4. Theodore J. Everett (forthcoming). Peer Disagreement and Two Principles of Rational Belief. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-14.
    This paper presents a new solution to the problem of peer disagreement that distinguishes two principles of rational belief, here called probability and autonomy. When we discover that we disagree with peers, there is one sense in which we rationally ought to suspend belief, and another in which we rationally ought to retain our original belief. In the first sense, we aim to believe what is most probably true according to our total evidence, including testimony from peers and authorities. In (...)
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  5. Marion Godman (forthcoming). The Special Science Dilemma and How Culture Solves It. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-18.
    I argue that there is a tension between the claim that at least some kinds in the special sciences are multiply realized and the claim that the reason kinds are prized by science is that they enter into a variety of different empirical generalizations. Nevertheless, I show that this tension ceases in the case of ‘cultural homologues’–such as specific ideologies, religions, and folk wisdom. I argue that the instances of such special science kinds do have several projectable properties in common (...)
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  6. David Liebesman (forthcoming). We Do Not Count by Identity. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-22.
    It is widely assumed in psychology, philosophy, and linguistics that we count by identity. For example, to count the dogs by identity, we correlate each dog that isn't identical to the rest with a natural number, starting with one and assigning each successive dog the successive natural number. When we run out of distinct dogs, we've yielded a correct count. I argue that this model of counting is incorrect. We do not count by identity.
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  7. Raamy Majeed (forthcoming). The Objects of Thought, by Tim Crane. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-3.
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  8. Ned Markosian (forthcoming). The Right Stuff. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-23.
    This paper argues for including stuff in one's ontology. The distinction between things and stuff is first clarified, and then three different ontologies of the physical universe are spelled out: a pure thing ontology, a pure stuff ontology, and a mixed ontology of both things and stuff. Eleven different reasons for including stuff in one's ontology are given . Then five objections to positing stuff are considered and rejected.
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  9. Robin McKenna (forthcoming). Assertion, Complexity, and Sincerity. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-17.
    The target of this paper is the ‘simple’ knowledge account of assertion, according to which assertion is constituted by a single epistemic rule of the form ‘One must: assert p only if one knows p’ . My aim is to argue that those who are attracted to a knowledge account of assertion should prefer what I call the ‘complex’ knowledge account, according to which assertion is constituted by a system of rules all of which are, taken together, constitutive of assertion. (...)
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  10. Michaelis Michael (forthcoming). Formal Causes: Definition, Explanation, and Primacy in Socratic and Aristotelian Thought by Michael T. Ferejohn. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-1.
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  11. Daniel Nolan (forthcoming). The A Posteriori Armchair. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-21.
    A lot of good philosophy is done in the armchair, but is nevertheless a posteriori. This paper clarifies and then defends that claim. Among the a posteriori activities done in the armchair are assembling and evaluating commonplaces; formulating theoretical alternatives; and integrating well-known past a posteriori discoveries. The activity that receives the most discussion, however, is the application of theoretical virtues to choose philosophical theories: the paper argues that much of this is properly seen as a posteriori.
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  12. Rik Peels (forthcoming). Believing at Will is Possible. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-18.
    There are convincing counter-examples to the widely accepted thesis that we cannot believe at will. For it seems possible that the truth of a proposition depend on whether or not one believes it. I call such scenarios cases of Truth Depends on Belief (TDB) and I argue that they meet the main criteria for believing at will that we find in the literature. I reply to five objections that one might level against the thesis that TDB cases show that believing (...)
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  13. Diane Proudfoot (forthcoming). The Predictive Mind by Jakob Hohwy. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-1.
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  14. Robert D. Rupert (forthcoming). Review of Jerry Fodor, LOT 2. [REVIEW] Australasian Journal of Philosophy.
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  15. Jonathan Schaffer (forthcoming). What Not to Multiply Without Necessity. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-21.
    The Razor commands us not to multiply entities without necessity. I argue for an alternative principle—The Laser—which commands us not to multiply fundamental entities without necessity.
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  16. Mark Schroeder (forthcoming). Being Realistic About Reasons, by Scanlon, T.M. [REVIEW] Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-3.
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  17. Neal A. Tognazzini (forthcoming). Grounding the Luck Objection. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-12.
    Many object to libertarianism by arguing that it manages to solve one problem of luck only by falling prey to another . According to this objection, there is something freedom-undermining about the very circumstances that the libertarian thinks are required for freedom. However, it has proved difficult to articulate precisely what it is about these circumstances that is supposed to undermine freedom—the absence of certain sorts of explanations has perhaps been the most common complaint. In this paper, however, I argue (...)
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  18. Aaron Wolf (forthcoming). Giving Up Hume's Guillotine. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-17.
    The appealing principle that you can't get an ‘ought’ from an ‘is’, sometimes called Hume's Guillotine , faces a well-known challenge: it must give a clear account of the distinction between normative and descriptive sentences while dodging counter-examples. I argue in this paper that recent efforts to answer this challenge fail because the distinction between normative and descriptive sentences cannot be described well enough to be of any help. As a result, no version of the principle is both true and (...)
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  19. Ru Ye (forthcoming). Fumerton's Puzzle for Theories of Rationality. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-16.
    Richard Foley has presented a puzzle purporting to show that all attempts in trying to find a sufficient condition of rationality are doomed. The puzzle rests on two plausible assumptions. The first is a level-connecting principle: if one rationally believes that one's belief that p is irrational, then one's belief that p is irrational. The second is a claim about a structural feature shared by all promising sufficient conditions of rationality: for any such condition, it is possible that one's belief (...)
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  20. Keith Allen (forthcoming). Hallucination And Imagination. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-16.
    What are hallucinations? A common view in the philosophical literature is that hallucinations are degenerate kinds of perceptual experience. I argue instead that hallucinations are degenerate kinds of sensory imagination. As well as providing a good account of many actual cases of hallucination, the view that hallucination is a kind of imagination represents a promising account of hallucination from the perspective of a disjunctivist theory of perception like naïve realism. This is because it provides a way of giving a positive (...)
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  21. Patrick Allo (forthcoming). Synonymy and Intra-Theoretical Pluralism. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-15.
    The starting point of this paper is a version of intra-theoretical pluralism that was recently proposed by Hjortland [2013]. In a first move, I use synonymy-relations to formulate an intuitively compelling objection against Hjortland's claim that, if one uses a single calculus to characterise the consequence relations of the paraconsistent logic LP and the paracomplete logic K3, one immediately obtains multiple consequence relations for a single language and hence a reply to the Quinean charge of meaning variance. In a second (...)
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  22. Peter Balint (forthcoming). Book Note. [REVIEW] Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-1.
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  23. Hagit Benbaji (forthcoming). Emotional Insight, by Brady, Michael S. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-3.
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  24. Ermanno Bencivenga (forthcoming). Realizing Reason: A Narrative of Truth and Knowing, by Danielle Macbeth. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-3.
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  25. Andrea Borghini (forthcoming). A Critical Introduction to Skepticism by Allan Hazlett. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-1.
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  26. Cristina Borgoni (forthcoming). Debating Self-Knowledge, by Brueckner, Anthony and Gary Ebbs. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-1.
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  27. Brady Bowman (forthcoming). The Romantic Absolute: Being and Knowing in Early German Romantic Philosophy, 1795–1804, by Dalia Nassar. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-2.
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  28. John P. Burgess (forthcoming). New Foundations for Physical Geometry: The Theory of Linear Structures, by Tim Maudlin. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-3.
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  29. Jennifer Corns (forthcoming). The Social Pain Posit. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-22.
    Although discussion of social pain has become popular among researchers in psychology and behavioural neuroscience, the philosophical community has yet to pay it any direct attention. Social pain is characterized as the emotional reaction to the perception of the loss or devaluation of desired relationships. These are argued to comprise a pain type and are explicitly intended to include the everyday sub-types grief, jealousy, heartbreak, rejection, and hurt feelings. Social pain is accordingly posited as a nested type of pain encompassing (...)
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  30. Damon Crockett (forthcoming). Surface Colour is Not a Perceptual Content. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-16.
    In this paper, I consider a view that explains colour experience by the independent representation of surface and illumination. This view implies that surface colour is a phenomenal perceptual content. I argue from facts of colour phenomenology to the conclusion that surface colour is not a phenomenal perceptual content. I then argue from results of surface-matching experiments to the conclusion that surface colour is neither a perceptual content of any kind nor any sort of computational output of the perceptual system. (...)
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  31. Oisín Deery (forthcoming). The Fall From Eden: Why Libertarianism Isn't Justified By Experience. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-16.
    Libertarians claim that our experience of free choice is indeterministic. They think that, when we choose, our choice feels open in a way that would require indeterminism for the experience to be accurate. This claim then functions as a step in an argument in favour of libertarianism, the view that freedom requires indeterminism and we are free. Since, all else being equal, we should take experience at face value, libertarians argue, we should endorse libertarianism. Compatibilists, who think that freedom is (...)
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  32. A. B. Dickerson (forthcoming). A World Without Why, by Geuss, Raymond. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-1.
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  33. Matt Duncan (forthcoming). I Think, Therefore I Persist. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-17.
    Suppose that you're lying in bed. You just woke up. But you're alert. Your mind is clear and you have no distractions. As you lie there, you think to yourself, ‘2 + 2 = 4.’ The thought just pops into your head. But, wanting to be sure of your mathematical insight, you once again think ‘2 + 2 = 4’, this time really meditating on your thought. Now suppose that you're sitting in an empty movie theatre. The lighting is normal (...)
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  34. Mehmet Elgin & Elliott Sober (forthcoming). Causal, A Priori True, and Explanatory: A Reply to Lange and Rosenberg. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-5.
    Sober [2011] argues that some causal statements are a priori true and that a priori causal truths are central to explanations in the theory of natural selection. Lange and Rosenberg [2011] criticize Sober's argument. They concede that there are a priori causal truths, but maintain that those truths are only ‘minimally causal’. They also argue that explanations that are built around a priori causal truths are not causal explanations, properly speaking. Here we criticize both of Lange and Rosenberg's claims.
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  35. Michael Garnett (forthcoming). Autonomy as Social Independence: Reply to Weimer. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-5.
    I defend my pure social account of global autonomy from Steven Weimer's recent criticisms. In particular, I argue that it does not implicitly rely upon the very kind of nonsocial conception of autonomy that it hopes to replace.
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  36. Mary Louise Gill (forthcoming). How Aristotle Gets by in Metaphysics Zeta, by Frank A. Lewis. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-3.
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  37. Theodore Gracyk (forthcoming). Critique of Pure Music, by James O. Young. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-3.
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  38. Mario Graziano (forthcoming). Genetics and Philosophy by Paul Griffiths and Karola Stotz. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-1.
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  39. Boris Hennig (forthcoming). Instance is the Converse of Aspect. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-18.
    According to the aspect theory of instantiation, a particular A instantiates a universal B if and only if an aspect of A is cross-count identical with an aspect of B. This involves the assumption that both particulars and universals have aspects, and that aspects can mediate between different ways of counting things. I will ask what is new about this account of instantiation and, more importantly, whether it is an improvement on its older relatives. It will turn out that the (...)
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  40. Lloyd Humberstone (forthcoming). Plural Logic, by Alex Oliver and Timothy Smiley. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-4.
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  41. Sebastian Köhler (forthcoming). What is the Problem with Fundamental Moral Error? Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-5.
    Quasi-realists argue that meta-ethical expressivism is fully compatible with the central assumptions underlying ordinary moral practice. In a recent paper, Andy Egan has developed a vexing challenge for this project, arguing that expressivism is incompatible with central assumptions about error in moral judgments. In response, Simon Blackburn has argued that Egan's challenge fails, because Egan reads the expressivist as giving an account of moral error, rather than an account of judgments about moral error. In this paper I argue that the (...)
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  42. Frederick Kroon (forthcoming). The Nonexistent by Anthony, Everett. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-3.
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  43. Michael LeBuffe (forthcoming). A Sentimentalist Theory of Mind, by Slote, Michael Oxford. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-1.
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  44. David Macarthur (forthcoming). Possibilities of Perception by Church, Jennifer. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-4.
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  45. Ben Martin (forthcoming). Dialetheism and the Impossibility of the World. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-15.
    This paper first offers a standard modal extension of dialetheic logics that respect the normal semantics for negation and conjunction, in an attempt to adequately model absolutism, the thesis that there are true contradictions at metaphysically possible worlds. It is shown, however, that the modal extension has unsavoury consequences for both absolutism and dialetheism. While the logic commits the absolutist to dialetheism, it commits the dialetheist to the impossibility of the actual world. A new modal logic AV is then proposed (...)
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  46. Graham Oppy (forthcoming). Analysis of Existing: Barry Miller's Approach to God, by Kremer, Elmar J. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-1.
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  47. James I. Porter (forthcoming). The Poetics of Phantasia: Imagination in Ancient Aesthetics, by Anne Sheppard. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-1.
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  48. Sagar Sanyal (forthcoming). Truly Human Enhancement: A Philosophical Defense of Limits, Agar, Nicholas. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-1.
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  49. John S. Wilkins (forthcoming). Philosophy of Biology, by Godfrey-Smith, Peter. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-1.
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  50. S. G. Williams (forthcoming). Immunity to Error Through Misidentification: New Essays, by Prosser, Simon and François Recanati. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-1.
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  51. Emma Wood (forthcoming). Moral Error Theory: History, Critique, Defence, by Olson, Jonas. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-1.
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  52. Moira Gatens (forthcoming). Book Note. [REVIEW] Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-1.
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  53. J. Adam Carter & Duncan Pritchard (forthcoming). Knowledge-How and Epistemic Value. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-18.
    A conspicuous oversight in recent debates about the vexed problem of the value of knowledge has been the value of knowledge-how. This would not be surprising if knowledge-how were, as Gilbert Ryle [1945, 1949] famously thought, fundamentally different from knowledge-that. However, reductive intellectualists [e.g. Stanley and Williamson 2001; Brogaard 2008, 2009, 2011; Stanley 2011a, 2011b] maintain that knowledge-how just is a kind of knowledge-that. Accordingly, reductive intellectualists must predict that the value problems facing propositional knowledge will equally apply to knowledge-how. (...)
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  54. Nomy Arpaly (forthcoming). Consciousness and Moral Responsibility, by Neil Levy. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-3.
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  55. Saba Bazargan (forthcoming). Defensive Wars and the Reprisal Dilemma. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-19.
    I address a foundational problem with accounts of the morality of war that are derived from the Just War Tradition . Such accounts problematically focus on ‘the moment of crisis’: i.e. when a state is considering a resort to war. This is problematic because sometimes the state considering the resort to war is partly responsible for wrongly creating the conditions in which the resort to war becomes necessary. By ignoring this possibility, JWT effectively ignores, in its moral evaluation of wars, (...)
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  56. Jc Beall (forthcoming). Eco-Logical Lives: The Philosophical Lives of Richard Routley/Sylvan and Val Routley/Plumwood, by Hyde, Dominic. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-3.
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  57. Bridget Clarke (forthcoming). Book Note. [REVIEW] Australasian Journal of Philosophy.
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  58. Richard Colledge (forthcoming). Book Note. [REVIEW] Australasian Journal of Philosophy.
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  59. Frederique de Vignemont (forthcoming). Pain and Bodily Care: Whose Body Matters? Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-19.
    Pain is unpleasant. It is something that one avoids as much as possible. One might then claim that one wants to avoid pain because one cares about one's body. On this view, individuals who do not experience pain as unpleasant and to be avoided, like patients with pain asymbolia, do not care about their body. This conception of pain has been recently defended by Bain [2014] and Klein [forthcoming]. In their view, one needs to care about one's body for pain (...)
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  60. Phil Dowe (forthcoming). Book Note. [REVIEW] Australasian Journal of Philosophy.
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  61. Catarina Dutilh Novaes (forthcoming). Articulating Medieval Logic, by Parsons, Terence. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-3.
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  62. Daniel Greco (forthcoming). Epistemological Open Questions. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-15.
    While there has been a great deal of recent interest in parallels between metaethics and metaepistemology, there has been little discussion of epistemological analogues of the open question argument . This is somewhat surprising—the general trend in recent work is in the direction of emphasizing the continuity between metaethics and metaepistemology, and to treat metanormative questions as arising in parallel in these two normative domains. And while the OQA has been subjected to a wide variety of objections, it is still (...)
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  63. Nicole Hassoun (forthcoming). Eternally Separated Lovers: The Argument From Love. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-11.
    A message scribbled irreverently on the mediaeval walls of the Nonberg cloister says this: ‘Neither of us can go to heaven unless the other gets in.’ It suggests an argument against the view that those who love people who suffer in hell can be perfectly happy, or even free from all suffering, in heaven. This paper considers the challenge posed by this thought to the coherence of the traditional Christian doctrine on which there are some people in hell who are (...)
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  64. Soraj Hongladarom (forthcoming). A Review of “Free Will, Agency, and Meaning in Life”, by Pereboom, Derk. [REVIEW] Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-1.
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  65. Jens Johansson (forthcoming). Review of Robert E. Goodin, On Settling (Princeton UP, 2012). [REVIEW] Australasian Journal of Philosophy.
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  66. Michael D. Kirchhoff (forthcoming). Species of Realization and the Free Energy Principle. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-18.
    This paper examines, for the first time, the relationship between realization relations and the free energy principle in cognitive neuroscience. I argue, firstly, that the free energy principle has ramifications for the wide versus narrow realization distinction: if the free energy principle is correct, then organismic realizers are insufficient for realizing free energy minimization. I argue, secondly, that the free energy principle has implications for synchronic realization relations, because free energy minimization is realized in dynamical agent-environment couplings embedded at multiple (...)
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  67. G. R. McLean (forthcoming). A Review of “The Handbook of Virtue Ethics”, Ed., van Hooft, Stan. [REVIEW] Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-1.
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  68. Jens David Ohlin (forthcoming). A Review of “The Morality of Defensive War”, Eds., Fabre, Cécile, and Seth Lazar. [REVIEW] Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-1.
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  69. Jaroslav Peregrin (forthcoming). What Logics Mean: From Proof Theory to Model-Theoretic Semantics, by James W. Garson. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-4.
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  70. Andrew Rotondo (forthcoming). Book Note. [REVIEW] Australasian Journal of Philosophy.
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  71. Andrew Rotondo (forthcoming). Disagreement and Intellectual Scepticism. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-21.
    Several philosophers have recently argued that disagreement with others undermines or precludes epistemic justification for our opinions about controversial issues . This amounts to a fascinating and disturbing kind of intellectual scepticism. A crucial piece of the sceptical argument, however, is that our opponents on such topics are epistemic peers. In this paper, I examine the reasons for why we might think that our opponents really are such peers, and I argue that those reasons are either too weak or too (...)
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  72. Christine Swanton (forthcoming). A Review of “Character as Moral Fiction”, by Alfano, Mark. [REVIEW] Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-1.
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  73. Tiziana Torresi (forthcoming). The Ethics of Immigration, by Carens, Joseph H. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-3.
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