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Forthcoming articles
  1. Jeremy William Dunham (forthcoming). Idealism, Pragmatism, and the Will to Believe: Charles Renouvier and William James. British Journal for the History of Philosophy:1-23.
    This article investigates the history of the relation between idealism and pragmatism by examining the importance of the French idealist Charles Renouvier for the development of William James’s ‘Will to Believe’. By focusing on French idealism, we obtain a broader understanding of the kinds of idealism on offer in the nineteenth century. First, I show that Renouvier’s unique methodological idealism led to distinctively pragmatist doctrines and that his theory of certitude and its connection to freedom is worthy of reconsideration. Second, (...)
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  2. Brian Embry (forthcoming). An Early Modern Scholastic Theory of Negative Entities: Thomas Compton Carleton on Lacks, Negations, and Privations. British Journal for the History of Philosophy:1-24.
    Seventeenth century scholastics had a rich debate about the ontological status and nature of lacks, negations, and privations. Realists in this debate posit irreducible negative entities responsible for the non-existence of positive entities. One of the first scholastics to develop a realist position on negative entities was Thomas Compton Carleton. In this paper I explain Carleton's theory of negative entities, including what it is for something to be negative, how negative entities are individuated, whether they are abstract or concrete, and (...)
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  3. Wolfgang Huemer (forthcoming). Themes From Brentano. [REVIEW] British Journal for the History of Philosophy:1-3.
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  4. John J. Kaag (forthcoming). The Lot of the Beautiful: Pragmatism and Aesthetic Ideals. British Journal for the History of Philosophy:1-23.
    This article focuses on the intimate relationship between German aesthetic theory, particularly the philosophies of Kant and Schiller, and the pragmatic tradition of the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. I argue that many aspects of Kantian aesthetic theory ? his development of reflective judgement, genius, and common sense ? are reflected in the thinking of C. S. Peirce. I conclude, however, that such a comparison risks selling short the way that German idealism influenced American thinkers and instead suggest that it (...)
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  5. Melissa McBay Merritt (forthcoming). Varieties of Reflection in Kant's Logic. British Journal for the History of Philosophy.
    For Kant, ‘reflection’ (Überlegung, Reflexion) is a technical term with a range of senses. I focus here on the senses of reflection that come to light in Kant’s account of logic, and then bring the results to bear on the distinction between ‘logical’ and ‘transcendental’ reflection that surfaces in the Amphiboly chapter of the Critique of Pure Reason. Although recent commentary has followed similar cues, I suggest that it labours under a blindspot, as it neglects Kant’s distinction between ‘pure’ and (...)
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  6. Severin Schroeder (forthcoming). The Oxford Handbook of Wittgenstein. [REVIEW] British Journal for the History of Philosophy:1-12.
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  7. Steven Tester (forthcoming). Kant and Rational Psychology. [REVIEW] British Journal for the History of Philosophy:1-3.
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  8. John J. Tilley (forthcoming). John Clarke of Hull's Argument for Psychological Egoism. British Journal for the History of Philosophy:1-21.
    John Clarke of Hull, one of the eighteenth century's staunchest proponents of psychological egoism, defended that theory in his Foundation of Morality in Theory and Practice. He did so mainly by opposing the objections to egoism in the first two editions of Francis Hutcheson's Inquiry into Virtue. But Clarke also produced a challenging, direct argument for egoism which, regrettably, has received virtually no scholarly attention. In this paper I give it some of the attention it merits. In addition to reconstructing (...)
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  9. Han Thomas Adriaenssen (forthcoming). The Radical Cartesianism of Robert Desgabets and the Scholastic Heritage. British Journal for the History of Philosophy:1-23.
    Robert Desgabets has been described as a ‘radical Cartesian’. Drawing conclusions from Descartes's thought that Descartes himself had failed to see, Desgabets treated Cartesianism as a work in progress that awaited further enrichment and development. But, as scholars have recognized, Desgabets's writings also betray a significant indebtedness to scholastic tradition. In presenting his philosophy, Desgabets often appeals to traditional notions, breathing new life into scholastic concepts and ideas. This paper investigates what we are to make of the scholastic vestiges in (...)
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  10. Charlotte Alderwick (forthcoming). Atemporal Essence and Existential Freedom in Schelling. British Journal for the History of Philosophy:1-23.
    Although it is clear in Schelling's Freiheitsschrift that he takes an agent's atemporal choice between good and evil to be central to understanding human freedom, there is no consensus in the literature and no adequate account of how to understand this choice. Further, the literature fails to render intelligible how existential freedom is possible in the light of this atemporal choice. I demonstrate that, despite their differences, the dominant accounts in the literature are all guilty of these failings and argue (...)
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  11. Benjamin Berger (forthcoming). Schelling’s Theory of Symbolic Language: Forming the System of Identity. British Journal for the History of Philosophy:1-4.
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  12. Jeremy William Dunham (forthcoming). On Habit. British Journal for the History of Philosophy:1-4.
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  13. Ludmila Guenova (forthcoming). Kant's Organicism: Epigenesis and the Development of Critical Philosophy. British Journal for the History of Philosophy:1-4.
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  14. Markus Kohl (forthcoming). Kant on the Inapplicability of the Categories to Things in Themselves. British Journal for the History of Philosophy:1-25.
    This paper addresses the question of what we can legitimately say about things in themselves in Kant's critical doctrine. Many Kant scholars believe that Kant allows that things in themselves can be characterized through the unschematized or ‘pure’ concepts of our understanding such as ‘substance’ or ‘causality’. However, I show that on Kant's view things in themselves do not conform to the unschematized categories : the pure categories, like space and time, are merely subjective forms of finite, discursive cognition. I (...)
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  15. Mogens Laerke (forthcoming). L'Art du Portrait Conceptuel. Deleuze Et l'Histoire de la Philosophie. British Journal for the History of Philosophy:1-3.
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  16. Matthew Meyer (forthcoming). Nietzsche's Naturalized Aestheticism. British Journal for the History of Philosophy:1-23.
    This essay seeks to overcome the divide that has emerged in recent scholarship between Alexander Nehamas’s reading of Nietzsche as an aestheticist who eschews the dogmatism implicit in the scientific project and Brian Leiter's reading of Nietzsche as a hard-nosed naturalist whose project is continuous with the natural sciences. It is argued that Nietzsche turns to the natural sciences to justify a relationalist ontology that not only eliminates metaphysical concepts such as ‘being’ and ‘things-in-themselves’, but also can be linked to (...)
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  17. Ohad Nachtomy (forthcoming). Philosophical Religions From Plato to Spinoza: Reason, Religion, and Autonomy. British Journal for the History of Philosophy:1-4.
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  18. G. A. J. Rogers (forthcoming). Locke's Metaphysics. British Journal for the History of Philosophy:1-3.
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  19. Joseph Shaw (forthcoming). Moral Dilemma in Medieval Thought: From Gratian to Aquinas. British Journal for the History of Philosophy:1-4.
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  20. José Filipe Silva (forthcoming). Potentially Human? Aquinas on Aristotle on Human Generation. British Journal for the History of Philosophy:1-19.
    Thomas Aquinas describes embryological development as a succession of vital principles, souls, or substantial forms of which the last places the developing being in its own species. In the case of human beings this form is the rational soul. Aquinas' well-known commitment to the view that there is only one substantial form for each composite and that a substantial form directly informs prime matter leads to the conclusion that the succession of soul kinds is non-cumulative. The problem is that this (...)
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  21. Frans Svensson (forthcoming). Non-Eudaimonism, The Sufficiency of Virtue for Happiness, and Two Senses of the Highest Good in Descartes's Ethics. British Journal for the History of Philosophy:1-20.
    In his reflections on ethics, Descartes distances himself from the eudaimonistic tradition in moral philosophy by introducing a distinction between happiness and the highest good. While happiness, in Descartes’s view, consists in an inner state of complete harmony and satisfaction, the highest good instead consists in virtue, i.e. in ‘a firm and constant resolution' to always use our free will well or correctly. In Section 1 of this paper, I pursue the Cartesian distinction between happiness and the highest good in (...)
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  22. Daniel Watts (forthcoming). Recent Work on Kierkegaard. British Journal for the History of Philosophy:1-8.
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  23. David J. Allen (forthcoming). Spinoza Contra Phenomenology: French Rationalism From Cavaillès to Deleuze. British Journal for the History of Philosophy:1-4.
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  24. Richard Kenneth Atkins (forthcoming). Peirce's Critique of Psychological Hedonism. British Journal for the History of Philosophy:1-19.
    Psychological hedonism is the theory that all of our actions are ultimately motivated by a desire for our own pleasure or an aversion to our own pain. Peirce offers a unique critique of PH based on a descriptive analysis of self-controlled action. This essay examines Peirce's critique and his accounts of self-controlled action and of desire.
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  25. Leo Catana (forthcoming). Review: Models of the History of Philosophy. Volume II: From Cartesian Age to Brucker, Ed. By Gregorio Piaia and Giovanni Santinello,(International Archives of the History of Ideas, 204). [REVIEW] British Journal for the History of Philosophy.
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  26. Roger Eichorn (forthcoming). Scepticism in the Eighteenth Century: Enlightenment, Lumiéres, Aufklärung. British Journal for the History of Philosophy:1-6.
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  27. Dina Emundts (forthcoming). Hegel as a Pragmatist. British Journal for the History of Philosophy:1-21.
    In this paper, I want to focus on the question whether Hegel's philosophy shares its main characteristics with pragmatism. I will answer this question affirmatively. In the first part, I sketch the understanding of pragmatism that allows me to call Hegel a pragmatist. In the second part, I turn to the specific project of Hegel's Phenomenology and try to substantiate the claim that Hegel is a pragmatist in this sense. I end with a discussion about the limits of my thesis (...)
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  28. Corinne Gartner (forthcoming). The Possibility of Psychic Conflict in Seneca's De Ira. British Journal for the History of Philosophy:1-21.
    This paper explores the potential for psychic conflict within Seneca's moral psychology. Some scholars have taken Seneca's explicit claim in De Ira that the soul is unitary to preclude any kind of simultaneous psychic conflict, while other interpreters have suggested that Seneca views all cases of anger as instances of akrasia. I argue that Seneca's account of anger provides the resources for accommodating some types of simultaneous psychic conflict; however, he denies the possibility of psychic conflict between two action-generating impulses, (...)
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  29. Spencer Johnston (forthcoming). Ockham and Buridan on the Ampliation of Modal Propositions. British Journal for the History of Philosophy:1-22.
    This paper explores a currently unnoticed argument used by John Buridan to defend his analysis of modal propositions and to reject the analysis of modal propositions of necessity put forward by William of Ockham. First, I explore this argument and, by considering possible responses of Ockham to Buridan, show some of the ways in which Ockham seems to be keeping closer to Aristotle's remarks about modal propositions in Prior Analytics, 18.
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  30. Michael LeBuffe (forthcoming). The Doctrine of the Two Kingdoms: Miracles, Monotheism, and Reason in Spinoza. British Journal for the History of Philosophy:1-15.
    Spinoza insists in the Theological Political Treatise that philosophy and theology are two separate kingdoms. I argue here that there is a basis in the psychology of the Ethics for one of the major components of the doctrine of the two kingdoms. Under the kingdom of theology, religion's principal function is to overcome the influence of harmful passion that prevents people from living life according to a fixed plan: people can live according to a fixed plan because they can obey. (...)
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  31. William Mander (forthcoming). William Hamilton on Causation. British Journal for the History of Philosophy:1-16.
    The nineteenth-century British philosopher William Hamilton defended his law of the conditioned in part on the strength of its ability to offer a satisfactory theory of causation. He maintained that our belief that every event is the outcome of some cause and the source of some further effect finds its ground, not in the world, but rather in the limitations of our own minds; specifically in our inability to conceive of either absolute commencement of being or its absolute annihilation. While (...)
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  32. Davide Orsi (forthcoming). Oakeshott on Practice, Normative Thought and Political Philosophy. British Journal for the History of Philosophy:1-24.
    This paper examines Michael Oakeshott's ideas on the relation between political philosophy and normative thought. To this end, some of the most controversial concepts of his thought are considered in the context of the philosophical debates that developed after the success of analytic philosophy and, in particular, of Ayer's Language, Truth, and Logic. First, the paper argues that, in contrast to analytic and ordinary language thinkers, Oakeshott defends the legitimacy and the rationality of normative thinking. To this end, the importance (...)
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  33. Carlos Santana (forthcoming). Two Opposite Things Placed Near Each Other, Are the Better Discerned’: Philosophical Readings of Cavendish's Literary Output. British Journal for the History of Philosophy:1-21.
    Seventeenth-century philosopher Margaret Cavendish wrote not only several philosophical treatises, but also many fictional works. I argue for taking the latter as serious objects of study for historians of philosophy, and sketch a method for doing so. Cavendish's fiction is full of conflicting viewpoints, and many authors have argued that this demonstrates that she did not intend her literary works to serve serious philosophical purpose. But if we consider philosophers more central to the canon, such as Plato or Kierkegaard, who (...)
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  34. Daniel Schwartz (forthcoming). Scandal and Moral Demandingness in the Late Scholastics. British Journal for the History of Philosophy:1-21.
    This paper examines the views of a number of late scholastic moral theologians, with emphasis on Francisco Suárez, about the limits of the duty to refrain from those otherwise permissible actions which make it difficult for people to choose uprightly. In so doing, the paper singles out and analyses a number circumstantial factors capable of excusing ordinary agents for giving others an occasion of sin.
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  35. R. L. Weed (forthcoming). The Blackwell Guide to Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics (Book Review). British Journal for the History of Philosophy.
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