Year:

  1. Tanabe Hajime & Timothy Burns (2013). Groundwork for the Metaphysics of Deductive Reasoning. Comparative and Continental Philosophy 5 (2):124-149.
    This article introduces the first English translation of one of Tanabe’s early essays on metaphysics. It questions the relation of the universal to the particular in context of logic, phenomenology, Neo-Kantian epistemology, and classical metaphysics. Tanabe provides his reflections on the nature of the concept of universality and its constitutive relation to phenomenal particulars through critical analyses of the issue as it is discussed across various schools of philosophy including: British Empiricism, the Marburg School, the Austrian School, the Kyoto School, (...)
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  2. Tanabe Hajime & Cody Staton (2013). An Essay on Kant's Theory of Freedom From the Early Works of Tanabe Hajime. Comparative and Continental Philosophy 5 (2):150-156.
    This paper presents the first English translation of one of Tanabe’s early essays on Kant. Tanabe marks the occasion of the first translation of the Critique of Practical Reason into Japanese by providing his reflections on Kant’s theory of freedom in this essay. This creative essay by Tanabe represents the hallmark Kyoto School interpretation of Kant. Tanabe weaves his account of Kant with elements from other philosophers in an attempt to think systematically about the nature of freedom. He agrees with (...)
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  3. Nishida Kitarō (2013). Coincidentia Oppositorum to Ai. Comparative and Continental Philosophy 5 (2):116-123.
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  4. Nishida Kitarō (2013). Coincidentia Oppositorum to Ai. Comparative and Continental Philosophy 5 (2):116-123.
    In 1919, Nishida Kitarō delivered a speech at Ōtani University discussing the relationship between Nicolaus of Cusa’s coincidentia oppositorum and love. The address, given within weeks of a disabling injury suffered by Nishida’s wife, Kotomi, gives evidence of how severe personal crisis would come to influence his philosophical work, and highlights several themes that would dominate the writings of the last twenty-five years of his life.
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  5. Jill Marsden (2013). In Search of Lost Sense. Comparative and Continental Philosophy 5 (2):189-198.
    When the brother of the poet Anne Carson died she wrote an elegy for him “in the form of an epitaph.” Her 2010 work Nox is a beguiling and beautiful work, as difficult to characterize as the brother it seeks to commemorate. This article explores the sensory experience of reading Nox, a text, which appeals to an elusive awareness at the edge of memory and imagination. In describing her brother, Carson evokes “a certain fundamental opacity of human being, which likes (...)
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  6. Corey McCall (2013). Foucault, Politics, and Violence. Comparative and Continental Philosophy 5 (2):199-211.
    Oksala’s book is the latest in a series of attempts to examine Foucault’s work during the late 1970s. We can delineate two clear trends in recent Foucault scholarship on this period: the first trend provides analyses and evaluations of this period while asecond trend attempts to apply Foucault’s analyses of these key concepts to contemporary society. Oksala’s book attempts to do both, although if forced to choose one would have to place it more firmly in the first camp than the (...)
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  7. Joshua Ramey (2013). Desire at the Encounter. Comparative and Continental Philosophy 5 (2):212-218.
    Nathan Widder’s Political Theory After Deleuze presents Deleuze’s political work in the context both of Deleuze’s ontology and a broader “ontological turn” in political theory. Contrasting Deleuze with both the “politics of lack” espoused by post-Hegelian and post-psychoanalytical theory, as well as with the “politics of abundance” proffered by pluralists such as William B. Connolly, Widder provides a subtle articulation of the contours and ultimate stakes of Deleuzian micropolitics. The book provides a powerful introduction both to Deleuze’s broader systematic work (...)
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  8. Franco Volpi (2013). Technology, Humanism and Practical Philosophy. Comparative and Continental Philosophy 5 (2):176-188.
    Which stance does philosophical thinking, namely practical philosophy, take in the face of the ever-growing challenge by science and technology? The central aim of this essay is to evaluate whether there are unexhausted resources that can be used to incorporate and cope with science and technology in the framework of a global experience of meaningfulness. The essay proceeds through an analysis of the state of present thinking under the conditions of technology and leads to a discussion about the possibilities for (...)
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  9. Andrew K. Whitehead (2013). Sex and a Drinking Song. Comparative and Continental Philosophy 5 (2):157-175.
    In this essay, I introduce Ikkyū Sōjun’s amoralism under the heading of negative ethics. I do so in the light of contemporary accounts of what some have called “Zen ethics.” Pushing away from such readings, the essay raises the issue of authority in Zen, whether it is construed as the authority of the dharma, the sangha, or the Buddha. Turning to the poetry of Ikkyū, I demonstrate that any such construing misses themark. As an alternative, I offer a reading of (...)
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  10. Clayton Crockett (2013). Ontotheological Turnings? The Decentering of the Modern Subject in Recent French Phenomenology. [REVIEW] Comparative and Continental Philosophy 5 (1):107-108.
     
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  11. Michael Eng (2013). Art and the Heideggerian Repression. Comparative and Continental Philosophy 5 (1):19-35.
    This essay conducts a reading of Jean-Luc Nancy’s and Jacques Rancière’s respective theorizations of the image. Using Nancy’s notion of literary communism, I first show how he and Rancière conceive the image as a site of community’s open writing and contestation. My reading then demonstrates how this “communism of the image” exposes Rancière’s repetition of an ontological gesture that he has attempted to dismiss as Heideggerian.
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  12. Timothy Freeman (2013). The Shimmering Shining. Comparative and Continental Philosophy 5 (1):49-66.
    In response to Hegel’s thesis concerning the “end of art,” John Sallis suggests that the future or the “promise of art” may be opened in thinking through Heidegger’s essay “The Origin of the Work of Art.” Sallis proposes that this promise of art may lie in the capacity to “set forth various elements through transfigurement into shining.” In this paper I reflect on what this suggestion concerning the promise of art may mean. Furthermore, I propose that “The Origin of the (...)
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  13. Leslie MacAvoy (2013). The Ambiguity of Facticity in Heidegger's Early Work. Comparative and Continental Philosophy 5 (1):99-106.
    The Early Heidegger’s Philosophy of Life: Facticity, Being and Language offers an interpretation of Heidegger’s concept of facticity as it is articulated in connection with the ideas of life and language in the lecture courses from 1919225. The book argues that facticity is both the source of vitality for theory and a source of deception and falsehood and therefore cannot be viewed in either positive or negative terms exclusively, but must instead be viewed as ambiguous. This essay argues that this (...)
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  14. Natalie Nenadic (2013). Heidegger, Arendt, and Eichmann in Jerusalem. Comparative and Continental Philosophy 5 (1):36-48.
    In Eichmann in Jerusalem: A Report on the Banality of Evil, Hannah Arendt aims to secure a more adequate understanding of the new crime of genocide so that it can be prosecuted in a manner that better serves justice. She criticizes the Nuremberg Trials and, to a lesser extent, the Jerusalem trial of Nazi war criminal Adolf Eichmann for miscasting this unprecedented crime in terms of familiar concepts and thereby obscuring it. Arendt claims that this atrocity, instead, demanded original thinking (...)
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  15. Robert Sanchez Jr & Robert Stolorow (2013). Psyches Therapeia: Therapeutic Dimensions in Heidegger and Wittgenstein. Comparative and Continental Philosophy 5 (1):67-80.
    This article explores the philosophies of Heidegger and Wittgenstein to illustrate the thesis that philosophy is a human activity exhibiting a unity of investigative and therapeutic aims. For both philosophers, the purpose of philosophical concepts is to point toward a path of transformation rather than to explain. For both, a first step on this path is the recognition of constraining illusions, whether conventional or metaphysical. For both, such illusions are sedimented in linguistic practices, and for both, philosophical investigation is a (...)
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  16. Devin Zane Shaw (2013). The Vitalist Senghor. Comparative and Continental Philosophy 5 (1):92-98.
    In this essay, I examine Diagne’s claim that the fundamental intuition of Léopold Sédar Senghor’s thought is this: African art is philosophy. Diagne argues that it is from an experience of African art and an encounter with Bergson’s philosophy that Senghor comes to formulate his philosophical thought, which is better understood as vitalist rather than essentialist. I conclude by arguing that Senghor’s vitalism is a philosophy of becoming which nevertheless lacks an account of radical political change.
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  17. Jason Kemp Winfree (2013). Wonder and the Elemental. Comparative and Continental Philosophy 5 (1):9-18.
    This paper approaches the experience of wonder phenomenologically. The account is descriptive. I suggest that in addition to the familiar treatments of wonder as constituted through a break with everyday involvement, on the one hand, and an awareness of the sheer fact of existence, on the other, the experience of wonder involves an intensification of the primary contact by which the world is given. That contact is prior to and presupposed by both our involvement with objects as implements of mediation (...)
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  18. Christopher Yates (2013). Hume and the Human Imagination. Comparative and Continental Philosophy 5 (1):81-91.
    Bernard Freydberg’s recent work is a careful and compact study of David Hume’s signature texts: An Enquiry Concerning Human Understanding , An Enquiry Concerning Principles of Morals , and “Of the Standard of Taste” . Contrary to traditional epistemological readings that comfortably situate Hume as an empiricist naturalist, Freydberg argues that he is better understood as a profound thinker of imagination and Socratic ignorance. Hume’s figurative and Platonic argumentation varies in each text, but Freydberg makes a convincing case that his (...)
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  19. Jeffrey A. Bernstein (2013). Thoughts on the Two Translations of Heidegger's Beiträge. Comparative and Continental Philosophy 4 (2):295 - 306.
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  20. Richard Ganis (2013). Sittlichkeit and Dependency. Comparative and Continental Philosophy 4 (2):219 - 235.
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  21. Kyriaki Goudeli (2013). The Potencies of Beauty. Comparative and Continental Philosophy 4 (2):253 - 263.
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  22. Samuel Green (2013). Diagnosis. Comparative and Continental Philosophy 4 (2):177 - 177.
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  23. James W. Heisig (2013). An Inquiry Into the Good and Nishida's Missing Basho. Comparative and Continental Philosophy 4 (2):237 - 251.
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  24. David Jones (2013). Editor's Preface. Comparative and Continental Philosophy 4 (2):169 - 172.
    Editor's Preface Content Type Journal Article Pages 1-5 Authors David Jones Journal Comparative and Continental Philosophy Online ISSN 1757-0646 Print ISSN 1757-0638 Journal Volume Volume 4 Journal Issue Volume 4, Number 1 / 2012.
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  25. Leah Kalmanson (2013). “The Bottomless Brightness of the Open Expanse”. Comparative and Continental Philosophy 4 (2):283 - 293.
    The recently published collection Japanese and Continental Philosophy: Conversations with the Kyoto School, edited by Bret Davis, Brian Schroeder, and Jason Wirth, gathers together the best in contemporary scholarship on the Kyoto School and its legacy. This review essay is an opportunity to raise questions about the implications of this scholarship and to reflect critically on the future of the field. Although early Kyoto School philosophers are renowned for their lofty intellectual rigor, almost every one at some point bemoaned the (...)
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  26. Lissa McCullough (2013). Simone Weil's Phenomenology of the Body. Comparative and Continental Philosophy 4 (2):195 - 218.
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  27. Edward F. Mooney (2013). The Literary Kierkegaard. Comparative and Continental Philosophy 4 (2):331 - 334.
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  28. Anna-Lena Renqvist (2013). An Apology for Pain. Comparative and Continental Philosophy 4 (2):179 - 193.
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  29. Mary-Jane Rubenstein (2013). The Rebirth of the Death of God. Comparative and Continental Philosophy 4 (2):273 - 281.
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  30. Frank Schalow (2013). Revisiting the Heidegger–Cassirer Debate. Comparative and Continental Philosophy 4 (2):307 - 315.
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  31. Rustam Singh (2013). Simulating. Comparative and Continental Philosophy 4 (2):265 - 271.
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  32. Andrea Staiti (2013). Human Culture and The One Structure. Comparative and Continental Philosophy 4 (2):317 - 330.
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  33. Paul Boshears (2013). Translating Chinese Classics in a Colonial Context: James Legge and His Two Versions of the Zhongyong, by Hui Wang, Peter Lang. [REVIEW] Comparative and Continental Philosophy 4 (1):166 - 167.
    Translating Chinese Classics in a Colonial Context: James Legge and His Two Versions of the Zhongyong, by Hui Wang, Peter Lang Content Type Journal Article Pages 166-167 Authors Paul Boshears, Europäische Universität für Interdisziplinäre Studien/The European Graduate School Journal Comparative and Continental Philosophy Online ISSN 1757-0646 Print ISSN 1757-0638 Journal Volume Volume 4 Journal Issue Volume 4, Number 1 / 2012.
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  34. Christina Gschwandtner (2013). Being and God: A Systematic Approach in Confrontation with Martin Heidegger, Emmanuel Levinas, and Jean-Luc Marion, by Lorenz B. Puntel. Comparative and Continental Philosophy 4 (1):164 - 165.
    Being and God: A Systematic Approach in Confrontation with Martin Heidegger, Emmanuel Levinas, and Jean-Luc Marion , by Lorenz B. Puntel Content Type Journal Article Pages 164-165 Authors Christina M. Gschwandtner, University of Scranton Journal Comparative and Continental Philosophy Online ISSN 1757-0646 Print ISSN 1757-0638 Journal Volume Volume 4 Journal Issue Volume 4, Number 1 / 2012.
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  35. Andrew Mitchell (2013). Guilty, by Georges Bataille. Comparative and Continental Philosophy 4 (1):162 - 163.
    Guilty , by Georges Bataille Content Type Journal Article Category Book Review Pages 162-163 Authors Andrew J. Mitchell, Emory University Journal Comparative and Continental Philosophy Online ISSN 1757-0646 Print ISSN 1757-0638 Journal Volume Volume 4 Journal Issue Volume 4, Number 1 / 2012.
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  36. A. Nuyen (2013). Review Articles. Comparative and Continental Philosophy 4 (1):141 - 150.
    In his new book, Ames defends his interpretation of Confucian ethics as "role ethics" through a detailed examination of the Confucian vocabulary. Through such vocabulary, we can see that the Confucian self is a being that cultivates itself as it lives and matures in the context of the family and society. As role ethics, Confucianism is distinct from the Western tradition and its Greek roots. However, in order to highlight the contrast between Confucianism and the Western tradition, Ames paints a (...)
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  37. Saitya Das (2013). Of Pain. Comparative and Continental Philosophy 3 (1).
    Of Pain Content Type Journal Article Pages - Authors Saitya Brata Das, Indian Institute of Advanced Study, Rashtrapati Nivas, Shimla, Himachal Pradesh, India Journal Comparative and Continental Philosophy Online ISSN 1757-0646 Print ISSN 1757-0638 Journal Volume Volume 3 Journal Issue Volume 3, Number 1 / 2011.
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  38. Rodolphe Gasché (2013). Of Facts and Essences. A Response. Comparative and Continental Philosophy 3 (1).
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  39. Franklin Perkins (2013). Wandering Beyond Tragedy. Comparative and Continental Philosophy 3 (1).
    Wandering Beyond Tragedy Content Type Journal Article Pages - Authors Franklin Thomas Perkins, Department of Philosophy, DePaul University Journal Comparative and Continental Philosophy Online ISSN 1757-0646 Print ISSN 1757-0638 Journal Volume Volume 3 Journal Issue Volume 3, Number 1 / 2011.
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