9 found

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Forthcoming articles
  1. Nancy C. Brown & Summer Johnson McGee (forthcoming). Conceptualizing Boundaries for the Professionalization of Healthcare Ethics Practice: A Call for Empirical Research. HEC Forum:1-17.
    One of the challenges of modern healthcare ethics practice is the navigation of boundaries. Practicing healthcare ethicists in the performance of their role must navigate meanings, choices, decisions and actions embedded in complex cultural and social relationships amongst diverse individuals. In light of the evolving state of modern healthcare ethics practice and the recent move toward professionalization via certification, understanding boundary navigation in healthcare ethics practice is critical. Because healthcare ethics is endowed with many boundaries which often delineate concerns about (...)
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  2. Mark P. Aulisio & Kavita Shah Arora (forthcoming). Speak No Evil? Conscience and the Duty to Inform, Refer or Transfer Care. HEC Forum:1-10.
    This paper argues that the type of conscience claims made in last decade’s spate of cases involving pharmacists’ objections to filling birth control prescriptions and cases such as Ms. Means and Mercy Health Partners of Michigan, and even the Affordable Care Act and the Little Sisters of the Poor, as different as they appear to be from each other, share a common element that ties them together and makes them fundamentally different in kind from traditional claims of conscience about which (...)
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  3. Rachelle Barina (forthcoming). Ethics Outside of Inpatient Care: The Need for Alliances Between Clinical and Organizational Ethics. HEC Forum:1-15.
    The norms and practices of clinical ethics took form relative to the environment and relationships of hospital care. These practices do not easily translate into the outpatient context because the environment and relational dynamics differ. Yet, as outpatient care becomes the center of health care delivery, the experiences of ethical tension for outpatient clinicians warrant greater responses. Although a substantial body of literature on the nature of the doctor–physician relationship has been developed and could provide theoretical groundwork for an outpatient (...)
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  4. Gerald D. Coleman Ss (forthcoming). Direct and Indirect Abortion in the Roman Catholic Tradition: A Review of the Phoenix Case. [REVIEW] HEC Forum.
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  5. Lauren Sydney Flicker (forthcoming). Review of Guidance for Health Care Ethics Committees. [REVIEW] HEC Forum:1-6.
    Guidance for Healthcare Ethics Committees edited by D. Micah Hester and Toby Schonfeld (2012) is a comprehensive guide for members of ethics committees. The book is designed to address the three essential missions of healthcare ethics committees (HECs): (1) Consultation, (2) Policy Writing, and (3) Education. Although there is already significant literature devoted to ethics consultation, the policy writing and education functions of ethics committees get relatively little attention in the literature. It is valuable to have a source that combines (...)
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  6. Robert Macauley (forthcoming). The Ethics of Cultivated Gratitude. HEC Forum:1-6.
    Given narrow operating margins, health care organizations are increasingly relying on philanthropy to fund operations. Since individuals provide the majority of philanthropic support, many organizations have expanded their “grateful patient fundraising” programs to include current inpatients, both established donors as well as persons of wealth. While this is legally permissible under HIPAA, it raises substantial ethical concerns for potential coercion of vulnerable patients, as well as unequal care stemming from preferential treatment and provided “amenities.” While some have drawn the analogy (...)
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  7. M. Berry Roberta, Sylvia Caley Lisa Bliss, A. Lombardo Paul, Jonathan Todres Jerri Nims Rooker & E. Wolf Leslie (forthcoming). Recent Developments in Health Care Law: Partners in Innovation. HEC Forum.
    This article reviews recent developments in health care law, focusing on the engagement of law as a partner in health care innovation. The article addresses: the history and contents of recent United States federal law restricting the use of genetic information by insurers and employers; the recent federal policy recommending routine HIV testing; the recent revision of federal policy regarding the funding of human embryonic stem cell research; the history, current status, and need for future attention to advance directives; the (...)
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  8. Mark R. Wicclair (forthcoming). Managing Conscientious Objection in Health Care Institutions. HEC Forum:1-17.
    It is argued that the primary aim of institutional management is to protect the moral integrity of health professionals without significantly compromising other important values and interests. Institutional policies are recommended as a means to promote fair, consistent, and transparent management of conscience-based refusals. It is further recommended that those policies include the following four requirements: (1) Conscience-based refusals will be accommodated only if a requested accommodation will not impede a patient’s/surrogate’s timely access to information, counseling, and referral. (2) Conscience-based (...)
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  9. H. Colby William, John Lantos Constance Dahlin & Myra Christopher John Carney (forthcoming). The National Consensus Project for Quality Palliative Care Clinical Practice Guidelines Domain 8: Ethical and Legal Aspects of Care. HEC Forum.
    In 2001, leaders with palliative care convened to discuss the standardization of palliative care and formed the National Consensus Project for Quality Palliative Care. In 2004, the National Consensus Project for Quality Palliative Care produced the first edition of Clinical Guidelines for Quality Palliative Care. The Guidelines were developed by leaders in the field who examined other national and international standards with the intent to promote consistent, accessible, comprehensive, optimal palliative care through the health care spectrum. Within the guidelines there (...)
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