15 found

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Forthcoming articles
  1. Nancy C. Brown & Summer Johnson McGee (forthcoming). Conceptualizing Boundaries for the Professionalization of Healthcare Ethics Practice: A Call for Empirical Research. HEC Forum:1-17.
    One of the challenges of modern healthcare ethics practice is the navigation of boundaries. Practicing healthcare ethicists in the performance of their role must navigate meanings, choices, decisions and actions embedded in complex cultural and social relationships amongst diverse individuals. In light of the evolving state of modern healthcare ethics practice and the recent move toward professionalization via certification, understanding boundary navigation in healthcare ethics practice is critical. Because healthcare ethics is endowed with many boundaries which often delineate concerns about (...)
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  2. Amy White (forthcoming). Body Integrity Identity Disorder Beyond Amputation: Consent and Liberty. HEC Forum:1-12.
    In this article, I argue that persons suffering from Body Integrity Identity Disorder (BIID) can give informed consent to surgical measures designed to treat this disorder. This is true even if the surgery seems radical or irrational to most people. The decision to have surgery made by a BIID patient is not necessarily coerced, incompetent or uninformed. If surgery for BIID is offered, there should certainly be a screening process in place to insure informed consent. It is beyond the scope (...)
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  3. Mark P. Aulisio & Kavita Shah Arora (forthcoming). Speak No Evil? Conscience and the Duty to Inform, Refer or Transfer Care. HEC Forum:1-10.
    This paper argues that the type of conscience claims made in last decade’s spate of cases involving pharmacists’ objections to filling birth control prescriptions and cases such as Ms. Means and Mercy Health Partners of Michigan, and even the Affordable Care Act and the Little Sisters of the Poor, as different as they appear to be from each other, share a common element that ties them together and makes them fundamentally different in kind from traditional claims of conscience about which (...)
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  4. Rachelle Barina (forthcoming). Ethics Outside of Inpatient Care: The Need for Alliances Between Clinical and Organizational Ethics. HEC Forum:1-15.
    The norms and practices of clinical ethics took form relative to the environment and relationships of hospital care. These practices do not easily translate into the outpatient context because the environment and relational dynamics differ. Yet, as outpatient care becomes the center of health care delivery, the experiences of ethical tension for outpatient clinicians warrant greater responses. Although a substantial body of literature on the nature of the doctor–physician relationship has been developed and could provide theoretical groundwork for an outpatient (...)
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  5. Gerald D. Coleman Ss (forthcoming). Direct and Indirect Abortion in the Roman Catholic Tradition: A Review of the Phoenix Case. [REVIEW] HEC Forum.
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  6. Barbara J. Daly, Ashley Rosko, Shulin Zhang & Hillard M. Lazarus (forthcoming). The Devil is in the Details: Confidentiality Challenges in the Age of Genetics. HEC Forum:1-8.
    This clinical case report illustrates the potential dilemmas that can arise from knowledge gained through genetic analysis. These conflicts require careful ethical analysis of presumed duties to protect patient privacy and maintain confidentiality, the duty to warn a second party of a health risk, and the duty of veracity. While the questions raised by genetic testing of one individual for disease that reveals potentially important information about relatives, such as risk for Huntington chorea or breast cancer, have been discussed, the (...)
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  7. Lauren Sydney Flicker (forthcoming). Review of Guidance for Health Care Ethics Committees. [REVIEW] HEC Forum:1-6.
    Guidance for Healthcare Ethics Committees edited by D. Micah Hester and Toby Schonfeld (2012) is a comprehensive guide for members of ethics committees. The book is designed to address the three essential missions of healthcare ethics committees (HECs): (1) Consultation, (2) Policy Writing, and (3) Education. Although there is already significant literature devoted to ethics consultation, the policy writing and education functions of ethics committees get relatively little attention in the literature. It is valuable to have a source that combines (...)
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  8. Robert Macauley (forthcoming). The Ethics of Cultivated Gratitude. HEC Forum:1-6.
    Given narrow operating margins, health care organizations are increasingly relying on philanthropy to fund operations. Since individuals provide the majority of philanthropic support, many organizations have expanded their “grateful patient fundraising” programs to include current inpatients, both established donors as well as persons of wealth. While this is legally permissible under HIPAA, it raises substantial ethical concerns for potential coercion of vulnerable patients, as well as unequal care stemming from preferential treatment and provided “amenities.” While some have drawn the analogy (...)
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  9. Thomas May, Kaija L. Zusevics, Arthur Derse, Kimberly A. Strong, Jessica Jeruzal, Alison La Pean Kirschner, Michael H. Farrell & Ryan Spellecy (forthcoming). The Limits of Traditional Approaches to Informed Consent for Genomic Medicine. HEC Forum:1-18.
    This paper argues that it will be important for new genomic technologies to recognize the limits of traditional approaches to informed consent, so that other-regarding implications of genomic information can be properly contextualized and individual rights respected. Respect for individual autonomy will increasingly require dynamic consideration of the interrelated dimensions of individual and broader community interests, so that the interests of one do not undermine fundamental interests of the other. In this, protection of individual rights will be a complex interplay (...)
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  10. Daniel McCall & Ana S. Iltis (forthcoming). Health Care Voluntourism: Addressing Ethical Concerns of Undergraduate Student Participation in Global Health Volunteer Work. HEC Forum:1-13.
    The popularity and availability of global health experiences has increased, with organizations helping groups plan service trips and companies specializing in “voluntourism,” health care professionals volunteering their services through different organizations, and medical students participating in global health electives. Much has been written about global health experiences in resource poor settings, but the literature focuses primarily on the work of health care professionals and medical students. This paper focuses on undergraduate student involvement in short term medical volunteer work in resource (...)
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  11. M. Berry Roberta, Sylvia Caley Lisa Bliss, A. Lombardo Paul, Jonathan Todres Jerri Nims Rooker & E. Wolf Leslie (forthcoming). Recent Developments in Health Care Law: Partners in Innovation. HEC Forum.
    This article reviews recent developments in health care law, focusing on the engagement of law as a partner in health care innovation. The article addresses: the history and contents of recent United States federal law restricting the use of genetic information by insurers and employers; the recent federal policy recommending routine HIV testing; the recent revision of federal policy regarding the funding of human embryonic stem cell research; the history, current status, and need for future attention to advance directives; the (...)
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  12. Allison Ross & Nafsika Athanassoulis (forthcoming). The Role of Research Ethics Committees in Making Decisions About Risk. HEC Forum:1-22.
    Most medical research and a substantial amount of non-medical research, especially that involving human participants, is governed by some kind of research ethics committee (REC) following the recommendations of the Declaration of Helsinki for the protection of human participants. The role of RECs is usually seen as twofold: firstly, to make some kind of calculation of the risks and benefits of the proposed research, and secondly, to ensure that participants give informed consent. The extent to which the role of the (...)
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  13. Griffin Trotter (forthcoming). Autonomy as Self-Sovereignty. HEC Forum:1-19.
    The concept of autonomy as self-sovereignty is developed in this essay through an examination of the thought of American transcendentalist philosophers Emerson and Thoreau. It is conceived as the quality of living in accordance with one’s inner nature or genius. This conception is grounded in a transcendentalist moral anthropology that values independence, self-reliance, spirituality, and the capacity to find beauty in the world. Though still exerting considerable popular and academic influence, both the concept of autonomy as self-sovereignty and the underlying (...)
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  14. Mark R. Wicclair (forthcoming). Managing Conscientious Objection in Health Care Institutions. HEC Forum:1-17.
    It is argued that the primary aim of institutional management is to protect the moral integrity of health professionals without significantly compromising other important values and interests. Institutional policies are recommended as a means to promote fair, consistent, and transparent management of conscience-based refusals. It is further recommended that those policies include the following four requirements: (1) Conscience-based refusals will be accommodated only if a requested accommodation will not impede a patient’s/surrogate’s timely access to information, counseling, and referral. (2) Conscience-based (...)
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  15. H. Colby William, John Lantos Constance Dahlin & Myra Christopher John Carney (forthcoming). The National Consensus Project for Quality Palliative Care Clinical Practice Guidelines Domain 8: Ethical and Legal Aspects of Care. HEC Forum.
    In 2001, leaders with palliative care convened to discuss the standardization of palliative care and formed the National Consensus Project for Quality Palliative Care. In 2004, the National Consensus Project for Quality Palliative Care produced the first edition of Clinical Guidelines for Quality Palliative Care. The Guidelines were developed by leaders in the field who examined other national and international standards with the intent to promote consistent, accessible, comprehensive, optimal palliative care through the health care spectrum. Within the guidelines there (...)
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