9 found

Year:

Forthcoming articles
  1. Courtenay R. Bruce, Margot M. Eves, Nathan G. Allen, Martin L. Smith, Adam M. Peña, John R. Cheney & Mary A. Majumder (forthcoming). “Systematizing” Ethics Consultation Services. HEC Forum:1-11.
    While valuable work has been done addressing clinical ethics within established healthcare systems, we anticipate that the projected growth in acquisitions of community hospitals and facilities by large tertiary hospitals will impact the field of clinical ethics and the day-to-day responsibilities of clinical ethicists in ways that have yet to be explored. Toward the goal of providing clinical ethicists guidance on a range of issues that they may encounter in the systematization process, we discuss key considerations and potential challenges in (...)
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  2. Gerald D. Coleman Ss (forthcoming). Direct and Indirect Abortion in the Roman Catholic Tradition: A Review of the Phoenix Case. [REVIEW] HEC Forum.
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  3. Barbara J. Daly, Ashley Rosko, Shulin Zhang & Hillard M. Lazarus (forthcoming). The Devil is in the Details: Confidentiality Challenges in the Age of Genetics. HEC Forum:1-8.
    This clinical case report illustrates the potential dilemmas that can arise from knowledge gained through genetic analysis. These conflicts require careful ethical analysis of presumed duties to protect patient privacy and maintain confidentiality, the duty to warn a second party of a health risk, and the duty of veracity. While the questions raised by genetic testing of one individual for disease that reveals potentially important information about relatives, such as risk for Huntington chorea or breast cancer, have been discussed, the (...)
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  4. Albert Farrugia, Joshua Penrod & Jan M. Bult (forthcoming). The Ethics of Paid Plasma Donation: A Plea for Patient Centeredness. HEC Forum:1-13.
    Plasma protein therapies (PPTs) are a group of essential medicines extracted from human plasma through processes of industrial scale fractionation. They are used primarily to treat a number of rare, chronic disorders ensuing from inherited or acquired deficiencies of a number of physiologically essential proteins. These disorders include hemophilia A and B, different immunodeficiencies and alpha 1-antitrypsin deficiency. In addition, acute blood loss, burns and sepsis are treated by PPTs. Hence, a population of vulnerable and very sick individuals is dependent (...)
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  5. M. Berry Roberta, Sylvia Caley Lisa Bliss, A. Lombardo Paul, Jonathan Todres Jerri Nims Rooker & E. Wolf Leslie (forthcoming). Recent Developments in Health Care Law: Partners in Innovation. HEC Forum.
    This article reviews recent developments in health care law, focusing on the engagement of law as a partner in health care innovation. The article addresses: the history and contents of recent United States federal law restricting the use of genetic information by insurers and employers; the recent federal policy recommending routine HIV testing; the recent revision of federal policy regarding the funding of human embryonic stem cell research; the history, current status, and need for future attention to advance directives; the (...)
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  6. Jeremy Frank Shearmur (forthcoming). The Gift Relationship Revisited. HEC Forum:1-17.
    If unremunerated blood donors are willing to participate, and if the use of them is economical from the perspective of those collecting blood, I can see no objection to their use. But there seems to me no good reason, moral or practical, why they should be used. The system of paid plasmapheresis as it currently operates in the United States and in Canada would seem perfectly adequate, and while there may always be ways in which the safety and efficiency of (...)
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  7. Margreet Stolper, Bert Molewijk & Guy Widdershoven (forthcoming). Learning by Doing. Training Health Care Professionals to Become Facilitator of Moral Case Deliberation. HEC Forum:1-13.
    Moral case deliberation (MCD) is a dialogue among health care professionals about moral issues in practice. A trained facilitator moderates the dialogue, using a conversation method. Often, the facilitator is an ethicist. However, because of the growing interest in MCD and the need to connect MCD to practice, healthcare professionals should also become facilitators themselves. In order to transfer the facilitating expertise to health care professionals, a training program has been developed. This program enables professionals in health care institutions to (...)
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  8. Steven Weimer (forthcoming). “I Can't Eat If I Don't Plass”: Impoverished Plasma Donors, Alternatives, and Autonomy. HEC Forum:1-25.
    One of the central considerations to be taken into account in evaluating the ethics of compensation for donated plasma is respect for donor autonomy. And one of the main arguments against compensated donation systems is that many donors do or would come from circumstances of poverty that restrict their alternatives in a way that compromises those donors’ autonomy. In this paper, I develop and defend a novel version of this “compromised autonomy argument” which improves upon extant versions by employing a (...)
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  9. H. Colby William, John Lantos Constance Dahlin & Myra Christopher John Carney (forthcoming). The National Consensus Project for Quality Palliative Care Clinical Practice Guidelines Domain 8: Ethical and Legal Aspects of Care. HEC Forum.
    In 2001, leaders with palliative care convened to discuss the standardization of palliative care and formed the National Consensus Project for Quality Palliative Care. In 2004, the National Consensus Project for Quality Palliative Care produced the first edition of Clinical Guidelines for Quality Palliative Care. The Guidelines were developed by leaders in the field who examined other national and international standards with the intent to promote consistent, accessible, comprehensive, optimal palliative care through the health care spectrum. Within the guidelines there (...)
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