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Forthcoming articles
  1. Mariana Fontes Costdaa (forthcoming). Who Rules the Ruler? On the Misconduct of Journal Editors. Journal of Academic Ethics.
    There are very few (published) accounts of editorial misconduct, and those that do exist are almost exclusively focused on medicine-related areas. In the present article we detail a case of editorial misconduct in a rather underexplored domain, the social sciences. This case demonstrates that although legal systems provide different instruments of protection to avoid, compensate for, and punish misconduct on the part of journal editors, the social and economic power unbalance between authors and publishers suggests the importance of alternative solutions (...)
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  2. Jack Corman Francis Rolleston, Paddi O'Hara Serge Gauthier & Rod Schmaltz (forthcoming). Ethics Issues with Private Research Ethics Boards: A Breakout Session at the 2009 Ncehr National Conference. Journal of Academic Ethics.
    Research Ethics Boards (REBs) provide oversight for Canadians that research projects will comply with standards of ethics if the studies are carried out as described in the documents that have been approved. While REBs have traditionally been affiliated with institutions such as universities and hospitals, a number of factors - including the increased volume of research being conducted outside academic centres - have resulted in the establishment of some private or independent REBs. This, in turn, has raised concerns about the (...)
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  3. Mahsa Izadinia (forthcoming). Authorship: The Hidden Voices of Postgraduate TEFL Students in Iran. Journal of Academic Ethics:1-15.
    Although an author is defined as someone who has made substantial contributions to a research study, sometimes power relations in student-supervisor collaborations play a more determining role in attribution of authorship. This article reflects the ideas of eight Iranian postgraduate Teaching English as a Foreign Language (TEFL) students about authorship policies and practices at their universities. The interview data indicate that the participants were not involved in authorship decisions and authorship credits were given based on their supervisors’ positions and seniority (...)
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