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Forthcoming articles
  1. Wiebke Bretschneider & Bernice Simone Elger (forthcoming). Expert Perspectives on Western European Prison Health Services: Do Ageing Prisoners Receive Equivalent Care? Journal of Bioethical Inquiry:1-14.
    Health care in prison and particularly the health care of older prisoners are increasingly important topics due to the growth of the ageing prisoner population. The aim of this paper is to gain insight into the approaches used in the provision of equivalent health care to ageing prisoners and to confront the intuitive definition of equivalent care and the practical and ethical challenges that have been experienced by individuals working in this field. Forty interviews took place with experts working in (...)
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  2. Donald Chalmers, Dianne Nicol, Pilar Nicolás & Nikolajs Zeps (forthcoming). A Role for Research Ethics Committees in Exchanges of Human Biospecimens Through Material Transfer Agreements. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry:1-6.
    International transfers of human biological material (biospecimens) and data are increasing, and commentators are starting to raise concerns about how donor wishes are protected in such circumstances. These exchanges are generally made under contractual material transfer agreements (MTAs). This paper asks what role, if any, should research ethics committees (RECs) play in ensuring legal and ethical conduct in such exchanges. It is recommended that RECs should play a more active role in the future development of best practice MTAs involving exchange (...)
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  3. Thomas Foreman (forthcoming). Ethics, Rhetoric, and Expectations: Responsibilities and Obligations of Health Care Systems. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry:1-5.
    Health care organization foundations and other fund-raising departments often function at an arm’s length from the system at large. As such, operations related to their mandate to raise funds and market the organization do not receive the same level of ethical scrutiny brought to bear on other arms within the organization. An area that could benefit from a more focused ethics lens is the use of language and rhetoric employed in order to raise funds and market the organization. Such departments (...)
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  4. Violet Handtke & Tenzin Wangmo (forthcoming). Ageing Prisoners' Views on Death and Dying: Contemplating End-of-Life in Prison. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry:1-14.
    Rising numbers of ageing prisoners and goals on implementing equivalent health care in prison raise issues surrounding end-of-life care for prisoners. The paucity of research on this topic in Europe means that the needs of older prisoners contemplating death in prison have not been established. To investigate elderly prisoners’ attitudes towards death and dying, 35 qualitative interviews with inmates aged 51 to 71 years were conducted in 12 Swiss prisons. About half of the prisoners reported having thought about dying in (...)
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  5. Jane Jankowski & Lisa Campo-Engelstein (forthcoming). A Better Half: The Ethics of Hemicorporectomy Surgery. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry:1-6.
    This paper discusses the ethical issues related to hemicorporectomy surgery, a radical procedure that removes the lower half of the body in order to prolong life. The literature on hemicorporectomy (HC), also called translumbar amputation, has been nearly silent on the ethical considerations relevant to this rare procedure. We explore five aspects of the complex landscape of hemicorporectomy to illustrate the broader ethical questions related to this extraordinary procedure: benefits, risks, informed consent, resource allocation and justice, and loss and the (...)
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  6. Géraldine Ruiz, Tenzin Wangmo, Patrick Mutzenberg, Jessica Sinclair & Bernice Simone Elger (forthcoming). Understanding Death in Custody: A Case for a Comprehensive Definition. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry:1-12.
    Prisoners sometimes die in prison, either due to natural illness, violence, suicide, or a result of imprisonment. The purpose of this study is to understand deaths in custody using qualitative methodology and to argue for a comprehensive definition of death in custody that acknowledges deaths related to the prison environment. Interviews were conducted with 33 experts, who primarily work as lawyers or forensic doctors with national and/or international organisations. Responses were coded and analysed qualitatively. Defining deaths in custody according to (...)
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  7. Ronald Aday & Lori Farney (forthcoming). Malign Neglect: Assessing Older Women's Health Care Experiences in Prison. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry:1-14.
    The problem of providing mandated medical care has become commonplace as correctional systems in the United States struggle to manage unprecedented increases in its aging prison population. This study explores older incarcerated women’s perceptions of prison health care policies and their day-to-day survival experiences. Aggregate data obtained from a sample of 327 older women (mean age = 56) residing in prison facilities in five Southern states were used to identify a baseline of health conditions and needs for this vulnerable group. (...)
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  8. Kelly Anderson (forthcoming). Global Health Case: Questioning Our Contributions. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry:1-2.
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  9. Bernard Baertschi (forthcoming). Human Dignity as a Component of a Long-Lasting and Widespread Conceptual Construct. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry:1-11.
    For some decades, the concept of human dignity has been widely discussed in bioethical literature. Some authors think that this concept is central to questions of respect for human beings, whereas others are very critical of it. It should be noted that, in these debates, dignity is one component of a long-lasting and widespread conceptual construct used to support a stance on the ethical question of the moral status of an action or being. This construct has been used from Modernity (...)
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  10. Marc Bekoff (forthcoming). Compassionate Conservation and the Ethics of Species Research and Preservation: Hamsters, Black-Footed Ferrets, and a Response to Rob Irvine: Comment on" Ethics of Species Research and Preservation" by Rob Irvine. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry.
  11. Belinda Bennett & Terry Carney (forthcoming). Planning for Pandemics: Lessons From the Past Decade. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry:1-10.
    It is now 10 years since the disease we now know as SARS—severe acute respiratory syndrome—caused more than 700 deaths around the world and made more than 8,000 people ill. More recently, in 2009 the global community experienced the first influenza pandemic of the 21st century—the 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic. This paper analyses the major developments in international public health law relating to infectious diseases in the period since SARS and considers their implications for pandemic planning.
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  12. K. A. Bramstedt (forthcoming). The Intouchables: Written and Directed by Olivier Nakache and Eric Toledano, 2011, Quad Productions (Clichy, 112 Minutes, French, Rated R). [REVIEW] Journal of Bioethical Inquiry.
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  13. K. A. Bramstedt (forthcoming). Amour: Written and Directed by Michael Haneke, 2012, Produced by Wega Film, Les Films du Losange, and X-Filme Creative Pool (Paris, 127 Minutes, French with English Subtitles, Rated PG-13). [REVIEW] Journal of Bioethical Inquiry.
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  14. Katrina A. Bramstedt (forthcoming). And If We All Lived Together?[Et Si on Vivait Tous Ensemble?]: Written and Directed by Stéphane Robelin, 2011, Les Films de la Butte (Paris, 96 Minutes, French with English Subtitles, Rated M). [REVIEW] Journal of Bioethical Inquiry.
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  15. Amanda Clacy, Rachael Sharman & Geoff Lovell (forthcoming). Return-to-Play Confusion: Considerations for Sport-Related Concussion: Comment on" Concussion-Driven Dilemmas in Sports Medicine: When Are Athletes Capable of Informed Refusal of Sports Medicine Care?" by Daniel Mellifont, Jamie Peetz, and Mark Sayers. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry.
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  16. Scott J. Fitzpatrick (forthcoming). Re-Moralizing the Suicide Debate. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry:1-10.
    Contemporary approaches to the study of suicide tend to examine suicide as a medical or public health problem rather than a moral problem, avoiding the kinds of judgements that have historically characterised discussions of the phenomenon. But morality entails more than judgement about action or behaviour, and our understanding of suicide can be enhanced by attending to its cultural, social, and linguistic connotations. In this work, I offer a theoretical reconstruction of suicide as a form of moral experience that delineates (...)
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  17. Sophie Flaherty (forthcoming). Patenting Treatment Methods. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry:1-4.
    Apotex Pty Ltd v Sanofi-Aventis Australia Pty Ltd [2013] 304 ALR 1At the heart of some disputes regarding medical treatment is the conceptual difficulty of finding the appropriate legal framework. The diagnosis and treatment of medical conditions are clearly subject to professional standards and thus sit within the negligence framework, but what of those who develop and provide that diagnosis and treatment? Do innovative approaches give rise to a patentable interest and can the intellectual property in a method of treatment (...)
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  18. Mark Giancaspro (forthcoming). Reproductive Tissue and Contract. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry:1-4.
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  19. Lorna Gibb (forthcoming). Procedure. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry:1-4.
    This piece examines the diagnostic procedures for breast cancer from the patient’s point of view, trying to establish the importance of communication and reassurance, while showing how the absence of these can lead to greater distress than necessitated.
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  20. Bridget Haire (forthcoming). It's Time: The Case for PrEP as an Active Comparator in HIV Biomedical Prevention Trials. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry:1-11.
    In July 2012, based on evidence from two major trials, the United States Food and Drug Administration approved the use of combined oral tenofovir/emtricitabine as pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) for people at high risk of HIV acquisition. PrEP effectiveness is marred by poor adherence, however, even in trial populations, thus it is not a magic bullet for HIV prevention. It is, however, the most effective biomedical HIV prevention intervention available for people at high risk of HIV, particularly those who have receptive (...)
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  21. Cressida J. Heyes & Angela Thachuk (forthcoming). Queering Know-How: Clinical Skill Acquisition as Ethical Practice. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry:1-11.
    Our study of queer women patients and their primary health care providers (HCPs) in Halifax, Nova Scotia, reveals a gap between providers’ theoretical knowledge of “cultural competency” and patients’ experience. Drawing on Patricia Benner’s Dreyfusian model of skill acquisition in nursing, we suggest that the dissonance between the anti-heteronormative principles expressed in interviews and the relative absence of skilled anti-heteronormative clinical practice can be understood as a failure to grasp the field of practice as a whole. Moving from “knowing-that” to (...)
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  22. N. Jing-Bao (forthcoming). The West's Dismissal of the Khabarovsk Trial: Ideology, Evidence and International Bioethics. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry.
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  23. Emma Kowal, Glenn Pearson, Lobna Rouhani, Chris S. Peacock, Sarra E. Jamieson & Jenefer M. Blackwell (forthcoming). Erratum To: Genetic Research and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry:1-1.
    Erratum to: Bioethical InquiryDOI 10.1007/s11673-012-9391-xLobna Rouhani, University of Melbourne, is a co-author of the article “Genetic Research and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians” (2012, 419–432) that was published in the Journal of Bioethical Inquiry’s 9(4) symposium “Cases and Culture.” Her name was omitted from the publication and she should be credited as the third author of this article.
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  24. David Levy, Ben Gadd, Ian Kerridge & Paul A. Komesaroff (forthcoming). A Gentle Ethical Defence of Homeopathy. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry:1-7.
    Recent discourses about the legitimacy of homeopathy have focused on its scientific plausibility, mechanism of action, and evidence base. These, frequently, conclude not only that homeopathy is scientifically baseless, but that it is “unethical.” They have also diminished patients’ perspectives, values, and preferences. We contend that these critics confuse epistemic questions with questions of ethics, misconstrue the moral status of homeopaths, and have an impoverished idea of ethics—one that fails to account either for the moral worth of care and of (...)
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  25. Liliane Lins & Fernando Martins Carvalho (forthcoming). Scientific Integrity in Brazil. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry:1-5.
    This article focuses on scientific integrity and the identification of predisposing factors to scientific misconduct in Brazil. Brazilian scientific production has increased in the last ten years, but the quality of the articles has decreased. Pressure on researchers and students for increasing scientific production may contribute to scientific misconduct. Cases of misconduct in science have been recently denounced in the country. Brazil has important institutions for controlling ethical and safety aspects of human research, but there is a lack of specific (...)
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  26. Pam McGrath, Nicole Rawson & Leonora Adidi (forthcoming). Diagnosis and Treatment for Vulvar Cancer for Indigenous Women From East Arnhem Land, Northern Territory: Bioethical Reflections. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry:1-10.
    This paper explores the bioethical issues associated with the diagnosis and treatment of vulvar cancer for Indigenous women in East Arnhem Land, Northern Territory, Australia. Based on a qualitative study of a vulvar cancer cluster of Indigenous women, the article highlights four main topics of bioethical concern drawn from the findings: informed consent, removal of body parts, pain management, and issues at the interface of Indigenous and Western health care. The article seeks to make a contribution towards Indigenous health and (...)
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  27. Jenni Millbank (forthcoming). Rethinking “Commercial” Surrogacy in Australia. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry:1-14.
    This article proposes reconsideration of laws prohibiting paid surrogacy in Australia in light of increasing transnational commercial surrogacy. The social science evidence base concerning domestic surrogacy in developed economies demonstrates that payment alone cannot be used to differentiate “good” surrogacy arrangements from “bad” ones. Compensated domestic surrogacy and the introduction of professional intermediaries and mechanisms such as advertising are proposed as a feasible harm-minimisation approach. I contend that Australia can learn from commercial surrogacy practices elsewhere, without replicating them.
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  28. Andrew Perechocky (forthcoming). Los Torturadores Medicos: Medical Collusion With Human Rights Abuses in Argentina, 1976–1983. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry:1-13.
    Medical collaboration with authoritarian regimes historically has served to facilitate the use of torture as a tool of repression and to justify atrocities with the language of public health. Because scholarship on medicalized killing and biomedicalist rhetoric and ideology is heavily focused on Nazi Germany, this article seeks to expand the discourse to include other periods in which medicalized torture occurred, specifically in Argentina from 1976 to 1983, when the country was ruled by the Proceso de Reorganización Nacional military regime. (...)
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  29. An Ravelingien, Veerle Provoost & Guido Pennings (forthcoming). Open-Identity Sperm Donation: How Does Offering Donor-Identifying Information Relate to Donor-Conceived Offspring's Wishes and Needs? Journal of Bioethical Inquiry:1-7.
    Over the past years, a growing number of countries have legislated open-identity donation, in which donor-conceived offspring are given access to the donor’s identity once the child has reached maturity. It is held that donor anonymity creates identity problems for such children similar to the “genealogical bewilderment” described within the adoption context. The study of the social and psychological effects of open-identity donation is still very much in its infancy, but what has been left unquestioned is whether (and to what (...)
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  30. David M. Shaw, Tenzin Wangmo & Bernice S. Elger (forthcoming). Conducting Ethics Research in Prison: Why, Who, and What? Journal of Bioethical Inquiry:1-4.
    Why devote an issue of an ethics journal to prison medicine? Why conduct ethics research in prisons in the first place? In this editorial, we explain why prison ethics research is vitally important and illustrate our argument by introducing and briefly discussing the fascinating papers in this special issue of the Journal of Bioethical Inquiry (JBI).Ethics is often regarded as a theoretical discipline. This is in large part due to ethics’ origin as a type of moral philosophy, which is frequently (...)
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  31. Nancy Sturman (forthcoming). Many Hurdles for the Translation of Species Preservation Research: Comment on" Ethics of Species Research and Preservation" by Rob Irvine. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry.
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  32. Robert L. Trestman (forthcoming). Ethics, the Law, and Prisoners: Protecting Society, Changing Human Behavior, and Protecting Human Rights. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry:1-8.
    Restricting a person’s liberty presents society with many inherent ethical challenges. The historical purposes of confinement have included punishment, penitence, containment, rehabilitation, and habilitation. While the purposes are indeed complex, multifaceted, and at times ambiguous or contradictory, the fact of incarceration intrinsically creates many ethical challenges for psychiatrists working in correctional settings. Role definition of a psychiatrist may be ambiguous, with potential tensions between forensic and therapeutic demands. Privacy may be limited or absent and confidentiality may be compromised. Patient autonomy (...)
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  33. Simon R. Walters & Rosemary Godbold (forthcoming). Someone Is Watching You: The Ethics of Covert Observation to Explore Adult Behaviour at Children's Sporting Events. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry:1-7.
    Concerns have been expressed about adult behaviour at children’s sporting events in New Zealand. As a consequence, covert observation was identified as the optimal research method to be used in studies designed to record the nature and prevalence of adult sideline behaviour at children’s team sporting events. This paper explores whether the concerns raised by the ethics committee about the use of this controversial method, particularly in relation to the lack of informed consent, the use of deception, and researcher safety, (...)
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  34. Tenzin Wangmo, Violet Handtke & Bernice Simone Elger (forthcoming). Disclosure of Past Crimes: An Analysis of Mental Health Professionals' Attitudes Towards Breaching Confidentiality. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry:1-12.
    Ensuring confidentiality is the cornerstone of trust within the doctor–patient relationship. However, health care providers have an obligation to serve not only their patient’s interests but also those of potential victims and society, resulting in circumstances where confidentiality must be breached. This article describes the attitudes of mental health professionals (MHPs) when patients disclose past crimes unknown to the justice system. Twenty-four MHPs working in Swiss prisons were interviewed. They shared their experiences concerning confidentiality practices and attitudes towards breaching confidentiality (...)
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  35. Karolyn L. A. White, Christopher F. C. Jordens & Ian Kerridge (forthcoming). Contextualising Professional Ethics: The Impact of the Prison Context on the Practices and Norms of Health Care Practitioners. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry:1-13.
    Health care is provided in many contexts—not just hospitals, clinics, and community health settings. Different institutional settings may significantly influence the design and delivery of health care and the ethical obligations and practices of health care practitioners working within them. This is particularly true in institutions that are established to constrain freedom, ensure security and authority, and restrict movement and choice. We describe the results of a qualitative study of the experiences of doctors and nurses working within two women’s prisons (...)
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  36. Sarah Winch, Michael Sinnott & Ramon Shaban (forthcoming). It Is Not Your Fault: Suggestions for Building Ethical Capacity in Individuals Through Structural Reform to Health Care Organisations: Comment on" Moral Distress in Uninsured Health Care" by Anita Nivens and Janet Buelow. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry.
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  37. Qing Yang & Geoffrey Miller (forthcoming). East–West Differences in Perception of Brain Death. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry:1-15.
    The concept of brain death as equivalent to cardiopulmonary death was initially conceived following developments in neuroscience, critical care, and transplant technology. It is now a routine part of medicine in Western countries, including the United States. In contrast, Eastern countries have been reluctant to incorporate brain death into legislation and medical practice. Several countries, most notably China, still lack laws recognizing brain death and national medical standards for making the diagnosis. The perception is that Asians are less likely to (...)
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