Year:

  1. Erich H. Loewy (1988). Oh Death, Where is Thy Sting? Reflections on Dealing with Dying Patients. Journal of Medical Humanities and Bioethics 9 (2):135-142.
    This paper examines the reactions of physicians and other health-professionals when they become involved in decisions about the death of their patients. The way people understand the condition of death has a profound influence on attitudes towards death and dying issues. Four traditional views of death are explored. The problem that physicians have in helping patients die (be it by hastening death through pain control, assisting patients in suicide or by more active means) is analyzed. Physicians, in dealing with such (...)
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  2. George Monteiro (1988). The Major's Therapy: Ernest Hemingway's “In Another Country”. [REVIEW] Journal of Medical Humanities and Bioethics 9 (2):143-152.
    “In Another Country” draws upon Hemingway's experiences during World War I. Narrated by a wounded young American, this story is a parable of early machine-rehabilitation therapy, one in which the strong optimism of a physician employing new machines is contrasted with the skepticism of an Italian major (“the greatest fencer in Italy”) who, disbelieving in the machines, nevertheless comes regularly for therapy to his hand. That daily attendance is interrupted only when the major's young wife dies suddenly. The major, who (...)
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  3. Clifton Perry (1988). Negligence in Securing Informed Consent and Medical Malpractice. Journal of Medical Humanities and Bioethics 9 (2):111-120.
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  4. Raphael Sassower & Michael A. Grodin (1988). Beyond Medical Ethics: New Directions for Philosophy and Medicine. [REVIEW] Journal of Medical Humanities and Bioethics 9 (2):121-134.
    A unique relationship exists between physicians and philosophers — one that expands on the constructive potential of the liaison between physicians and, for example, theologians, on the one hand, or, social workers on the other. This liaison should focus in the scientific aspects of medicine, not just the ethical aspects. Philosophers can provide physicians with a perspective on both the philosophy and the history of medicine through the ages — a sense of how medicine has adapted to the social cultural (...)
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  5. Donnie J. Self & Joy D. Skeel (1988). Professional Liability (Malpractice) Coverage of Humanist Scholars Functioning as Clinical Medical Ethicists. Journal of Medical Humanities and Bioethics 9 (2):101-110.
    In contrast to theoretical discussions about potential professional liability of clinical ethicists, this report gives the results of empirical data gathered in a national survey of clinical medical ethicists. The report assesses the types of activities of clinical ethicists, the extent and types of their professional liability coverage, and the influence that concerns about legal liability has on how they function as clinical ethicists. In addition demographic data on age, sex, educational background, etc. are reported. The results show that while (...)
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  6. Shari L. Thurer (1988). Rebel with a Cause: The Disabled Beggar. [REVIEW] Journal of Medical Humanities and Bioethics 9 (2):153-163.
    This paper analyzes the psychosocial implications of disabled begging. Conscious motives of these individuals may include profit, expediency, power, honesty, and public protest. Unconscious motives may include exhibitionism, anger, masochism, and rebellion. The social context, including hypocritical attitudes toward disability, is shown to contribute to the occurrence of this behavior.
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  7. T. Forcht Dagi (1988). Physicians and Obligatory Social Activism. Journal of Medical Humanities and Bioethics 9 (1):50-59.
    This essay examines the claim that physicians have a special obligation to engage in social and political activism. Four ethical paradigms are considered. Two paradigms, the preventive medicine and the social medicine models, embody a limited professional obligation to advocate the priority of health in society; the justification for a more aggressive stance is limited by the failings of paternalism. The radical model and the heroic model speak to issues of personal virtue rather than professional obligation; they are not strictly (...)
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  8. Bruce Kimball (1988). The Inclination of Modern Jurists to Associate Lawyers with Doctors: Plato's Response inGorgias 464–465. [REVIEW] Journal of Medical Humanities and Bioethics 9 (1):17-31.
    From the turn of the century, jurists have tended to associate lawyers with doctors as professionals and tried to ground this association in an analogy between law and medicine. Paradoxically, such comparisons suggest that American law and medicine are not analogous, while an analogy proposed by Plato illumines more fundamental respects in which law and medicine might be truly analogous.
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  9. Werner Lowenthal (1988). Ethical Dilemmas in Pharmacy Practice. Journal of Medical Humanities and Bioethics 9 (1):44-49.
    The purpose of this study was to document the responses of pharmacy students and pharmacists to various ethical dilemmas. The responses of the first professional year students, third professional year students and pharmacists were evaluated and compared. In most instances, responses indicated a high priority for patient/client welfare. Pharmacists and students reportedly act with regard to the dignity of life, individual freedom, and an inner sense of right.
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  10. Stephen Post (1988). An Ethical Perspective on Caregiving in the Family. Journal of Medical Humanities and Bioethics 9 (1):6-16.
    The emphasis on intra-family caregiving that prevailed from ancient until relatively recent times, in both philosophy and practice, was substantially displaced under the influence of the Eighteenth Century Enlightenment by an emphasis on individual independence. The ethics of familial relationships ceased to be at the center of philosophical interest. A consequence was growing inattention to the social conditions and practical arrangements needed to support family efforts to take care of the very young, the very old, the physically or mentally ill (...)
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  11. Bethany J. Spielman (1988). Financially Motivated Transfers and Discharges: Administrators' Ethics and Public Expectations. [REVIEW] Journal of Medical Humanities and Bioethics 9 (1):32-43.
    In response to a competitive environment, hospital administrators are pressuring physicians to discharge Medicare patients “sicker and quicker” and to transfer indigent patients from their emergency rooms. This paper compares health administrators' ethics to public expectations regarding financially motivated hospital transfers and discharges. Health administrators use balancing strategies: code morality, survivalism, mission dependency, and tithing. Public expectations, exemplified in P.L. 99–272, P.L. 99–509, and recent case law, are based on norms of potential for patient harm and patient occupancy. These norms (...)
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