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Forthcoming articles
  1. Carla Bagnoli (forthcoming). Moral Objectivity: A Kantian Illusion? Journal of Value Inquiry:1-15.
    Some moral claims strike us as objective. It is often argued that this shows morality to be objective. Moral experience – broadly construed – is invoked as the strongest argument for moral realism, the thesis that there are moral facts or properties. Realists, however, cannot appropriate the argument from moral experience. In fact, constructivists argue that to validate the ways we experience the objectivity of moral claims, realism must be rejected. There is a general agreement that ethical theory bears the (...)
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  2. Bagnoli Carla (forthcoming). Moral Objectivity: A Kantian Illusion? Journal of Value Inquiry.
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  3. David DeGrazia (forthcoming). Jeremy R. Garrett (Ed), The Ethics of Animal Research. Journal of Value Inquiry:1-6.
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  4. Leigh Duffy (forthcoming). Louise M. Antony (Ed.), Philosophers Without Gods: Meditations on Atheism and the Secular Life. Journal of Value Inquiry:1-6.
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  5. Mahesh Ananth (forthcoming). Gregory E. Kaebnick and Thomas H. Murray, Eds., Synthetic Biology and Morality: Artificial Life and the Bounds of Nature. [REVIEW] Journal of Value Inquiry:1-8.
    One way of acknowledging the putative progress of science is to trace its successes with respect to description, manipulation, and genuine innovation. In this regard, the history of genetics can be viewed as an exemplary case study. Indeed, the ground breaking work of Watson and Crick, the remarkable results associated with both describing and manipulating regulatory genes (e.g., early and recent work on Drosophila), and the cutting edge efforts related to nuclear transfer (i.e., cloning) are stunning progress-worthy accomplishments. Yet, there (...)
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  6. Michael Campbell (forthcoming). Absolute Goodness: In Defence of the Useless and Immoral. Journal of Value Inquiry:1-18.
    IntroductionKraut defines absolute goodness as follows: for something to be absolutely good is for its goodness to be unrelated to the needs or interests of any individual.See Richard Kraut, Against Absolute Goodness (Oxford: OUP, 2011), pp. 4ff. Let’s allow goodness to apply broadly to objects, states of affairs and events (including actions). (Although for Kraut the goodness of objects will be derivative on the goodness of elements of an individual’s life.See Kraut, op. cit., ch. 1.) Treat x as a variable (...)
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  7. Ward E. Jones (forthcoming). Wisdom as an Aim of Higher Education. Journal of Value Inquiry:1-15.
    IntroductionA central concern of theoretical speculation about education is the kind of epistemic states that education can and should aim to achieve. One such epistemic state, long neglected in both education theory and philosophy, is wisdom. Might wisdom be something that educators should aim for? And might it be something that their students can achieve? My answer will be a qualified yes.One qualification derives from the fact that in the present paper I will only be concerned with the potentiality of (...)
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  8. Chris Mayer (forthcoming). Anthony Cunningham, Modern Honor: A Philosophical Defense. Journal of Value Inquiry:1-5.
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  9. Juha Räikkä & Rosa Rantanen (forthcoming). James Stacey Taylor (Ed.): The Metaphysics and Ethics of Death. Journal of Value Inquiry:1-6.
    This is the first collection of essays of philosophical thanatology that explicitly connects the metaphysical and the ethical questions of death, including some bioethical questions. The volume has four sections, and the discussion moves from historical and theoretical problems to practical issues of bioethics. However, as the editor of the book, James Stacey Taylor, has surely intended, the practical questions discussed are closely related to traditional metaphysical problems, most notably to the questions such as whether death is a harm to (...)
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  10. Michael Ridge (forthcoming). Naïve Practical Reasoning and the Second-Person Standpoint: Simple Reasons for Simple People? Journal of Value Inquiry:1-14.
    Much contemporary first-order moral theory revolves around the debate between consequentialists and deontologists. Depressingly, this debate often seems to come down to irresolvable first-order intuition mongering about runaway trolleys, drowning children in shallow ponds, lying to murderers at doors, and the like. Prima facie, common sense morality contains both consequentialist and deontological elements, so it may be no surprise that direct appeal to first-order intuitions tend towards stalemate. One might infer from this that we should simply embrace some sort of (...)
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