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Forthcoming articles
  1. Amir Saemi (forthcoming). The Guise of the Good and the Problem of Over-Intellectualism. Journal of Value Inquiry 48 (2):1-13.
    Abstract – I will argue that Raz’s defense of the doctrine of the guise of the good rests on a over-intellectualized account of action. Raz holds that attributing evaluative beliefs to agents is justified on explanatory grounds. I argue that this account fails to do justice to the first-personal character of action explanation. Moreover, I will argue that Raz’s account of action has its root in his restrictive and over-intellectualized understanding of normative explanation. I will suggest that we can have (...)
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  2. Rik Peels (forthcoming). Hume's Law Violated? Journal of Value Inquiry:1-7.
    Jesse Prinz has recently argued that if sensibility theory is true, then there is a sense in which what has been called ‘Hume’s Law’ – the position that one cannot derive an ought from an is – can be violated. In this short critical note, I argue that Prinz’s argument is problematic for at least three reasons. First, the ought that he derives from an is is not genuinely prescriptive. Second, Prinz’s argument violates the widely accepted principle of disquotation and (...)
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  3. Paul Prescott (forthcoming). Unthinkable ≠ Unknowable: On Charlotte Delbo's 'Il Faut Donner à Voir'. Journal of Value Inquiry:1-12.
    This paper is an attempt to articulate and defend a new imperative, Auschwitz survivor Charlotte Delbo’s Il faut donner à voir: “They must be made to see.” Assuming the ‘they’ in Delbo’s imperative is ‘us’ gives rise to three questions: (1) what must we see? (2) can we see it? and (3) why is it that we must? I maintain that what we must see is the reality of evil; that we are by and large unwilling, and often unable, to (...)
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  4. David DeGrazia (forthcoming). Jeremy R. Garrett (Ed), The Ethics of Animal Research. Journal of Value Inquiry:1-6.
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  5. Leigh Duffy (forthcoming). Louise M. Antony (Ed.), Philosophers Without Gods: Meditations on Atheism and the Secular Life. Journal of Value Inquiry:1-6.
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  6. Micah Lott (forthcoming). Situationism, Skill, and the Rarity of Virtue. Journal of Value Inquiry:1-15.
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  7. Hili Razinsky (forthcoming). An Outline for Ambivalence of Value Judgment. Journal of Value Inquiry:1-20.
    Ambivalence of Value JudgmentAmbivalence, in the central cases to be discussed here, can be formulated as the holding of opposed mental attitudes – and in particular opposed value judgments – towards the same object. Many philosophers believe that ambivalence is strictly impossible. Others allow ambivalence, but only as a subjective attitude that does not reveal anything about the logic of the propositions judged, whereas in so far as these propositions themselves are concerned, any conflict is resolvable. On other accounts, ambivalence (...)
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  8. Peter Seipel (forthcoming). Is There Sufficient Common Ground to Resolve the Abortion Debate? Journal of Value Inquiry:1-15.
    A common response to ongoing disagreement about abortion has been to look for overlap between the prolife and prochoice sides of the debate. In recent years, however, both opposing camps in the debate have claimed to be able to establish their respective positions on the basis of the same common ground. Faced with the apparent failure of philosophers to settle their differences about abortion by means of shared values, the question naturally arises: what should we do about this? It is (...)
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  9. Adam Slavny (forthcoming). How Eventful is the Event-Based Theory of Harm? Journal of Value Inquiry:1-13.
    IntroductionHarm is a fundamental concept featuring in many normative claims. In the political context, it is sometimes argued that the only justification for state coercion is the prevention of harm to others, or that it is impermissible to forcibly prevent someone harming themselves. In ethics, many philosophers endorse weighty constraints against harming others. Finally, remedial duties in the civil law are usually conceptualised as responses to harm. Given its broad significance, the recent increase in attention to the philosophical foundations of (...)
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  10. Mahesh Ananth (forthcoming). Gregory E. Kaebnick and Thomas H. Murray, Eds., Synthetic Biology and Morality: Artificial Life and the Bounds of Nature. [REVIEW] Journal of Value Inquiry:1-8.
    One way of acknowledging the putative progress of science is to trace its successes with respect to description, manipulation, and genuine innovation. In this regard, the history of genetics can be viewed as an exemplary case study. Indeed, the ground breaking work of Watson and Crick, the remarkable results associated with both describing and manipulating regulatory genes (e.g., early and recent work on Drosophila), and the cutting edge efforts related to nuclear transfer (i.e., cloning) are stunning progress-worthy accomplishments. Yet, there (...)
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  11. Greg A. Damico (forthcoming). 2014 Rockefeller Prize Winner: Sameness in Being Is Sameness in Species: Or: Was an Aristotelian Philosophy of Identity Ever Credible? Journal of Value Inquiry:1-13.
    The sun is in fact the same thing as the brightest object in the sky, but it would seem that the sun and the brightest object might have been different. Socrates may now be the same thing as the seated thing (because Socrates is now seated), but it would seem that Socrates and the seated thing will later be different (once Socrates rises). Now Aristotle’s usual way of describing such situations is to say that such pairs of entities are accidentally (...)
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  12. Luara Ferracioli (forthcoming). On the Value of Intimacy in Procreation. Journal of Value Inquiry:1-21.
    She’ll get paid…we don’t need to see her. As long asshe’s healthy and delivers my babies healthily,she’s done a job for us.British woman referring to her Indian surrogate, in Poonam Taneja, “The couple having four babies by two surrogates,” BBC Asian Network (2013) at .IntroductionWhen two adults meet, fall in love, and commit themselves to a romantic relationship, a time will come when they must decide whether or not to have children. It is no exaggeration to say that this particular (...)
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  13. Jessy E. G. Jordan (forthcoming). Reconsidering Iris Murdoch's Moral Realism. Journal of Value Inquiry:1-15.
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  14. Chris Mayer (forthcoming). Anthony Cunningham, Modern Honor: A Philosophical Defense. Journal of Value Inquiry:1-5.
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  15. Kristie Miller (forthcoming). Conditional and Prospective Apologies. Journal of Value Inquiry:1-15.
    IntroductionThe possibility of prospective apologies has been ignored and conditional apologies have typically been thought to be insincere, deceptive, or at the very least, not meaningful. In large part this is because authors have attended to a particular suite of psychological features of those who issue an apology, and the presence of this suite of features has been taken to provide evidence that an apology is meaningful, while the absence of said psychological features is taken to provide evidence that the (...)
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  16. Christopher Morgan-Knapp (forthcoming). A Thoreauvian Account of Prudential Value. Journal of Value Inquiry:1-17.
    Henry David Thoreau has not left much of a mark on contemporary analytic philosophy. This is not terribly surprising. We typically prize clarity and argumentative rigor. And though the virtues of Thoreau’s writing are many, clarity and rigor are not among them. Indeed, Thoreau seems not only to be aware of this, but to revel in it. Near the end of Walden, he writes:It is a ridiculous demand which England and America make, that you shall speak so that they can (...)
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  17. Juha Räikkä & Rosa Rantanen (forthcoming). James Stacey Taylor (Ed.): The Metaphysics and Ethics of Death. Journal of Value Inquiry:1-6.
    This is the first collection of essays of philosophical thanatology that explicitly connects the metaphysical and the ethical questions of death, including some bioethical questions. The volume has four sections, and the discussion moves from historical and theoretical problems to practical issues of bioethics. However, as the editor of the book, James Stacey Taylor, has surely intended, the practical questions discussed are closely related to traditional metaphysical problems, most notably to the questions such as whether death is a harm to (...)
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  18. Mark Sagoff (forthcoming). Art and Authenticity: A Reply to Jaworski. Journal of Value Inquiry:1-13.
    In a thoughtful paper, Peter Martin Jaworski has written, “The debate over originals, authenticity, fakes, duplicates, and forgery got its start in the mid-60s and then continued until the ‘80s.”Peter Martin Jaworski. “In Defense of Fakes and Artistic Treason: Why Visually-Indistinguishable Duplicates Are as Good as the Originals.” Journal of Value Inquiry (2013), pp. 391–405. Quotation at p. 392. The debate, at least insofar as I participated in it, questioned whether original paintings and forgeries were sufficiently alike – sufficiently the (...)
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  19. James Sias (forthcoming). Ethical Intuitionism and the Emotions: Toward an Empirically Adequate Moral Sense Theory. Journal of Value Inquiry:1-17.
    IntroductionEthical intuitionists have never known quite what to make of the emotions. Generally speaking, these philosophers fall into two camps: rational intuitionists and moral sense theorists. And by my lights, neither camp has been able to tell a convincing story about the exact role and significance of emotion in moral judgment. Rational intuitionists are for the most part too dismissive of the emotions, either regarding emotions as little more than distractions to moral judgment,Samuel Clarke, for instance, after naming our “faculties (...)
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