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  1. Frank Ankersmit (2013). Introduction: History and Truth. Journal of the Philosophy of History 7 (3):257-265.
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  2. Frank Ankersmit (2013). History as the Science of the Individual. Journal of the Philosophy of History 7 (3):396-425.
    It has often been argued – especially by historicists – that history deals with the individual where science focuses on the universal. But few philosophers would nowadays express their agreement with the historicist’s demarcation between history and the sciences. A standard criticism is that knowledge of the individual can only be expressed by an appeal to universals. This essay is an effort to rehabilitate the historicist argument by means of a closer and more accurate analysis of the notion of the (...)
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  3. Giuseppina D'Oro (2013). Understanding Others: Cultural Anthropology with Collingwood and Quine. Journal of the Philosophy of History 7 (3):326-345.
  4. Guiseppina D'Oro (2013). Understanding Others: Cultural Anthropology with Collingwood and Quine. Journal of the Philosophy of History 7 (3):326-345.
    On one meaning of the term “historicism” to be a historicist is to be committed to the claim that the human sciences have a methodology of their own that is distinct in kind and not only in degree from that of the natural sciences. In this sense of the term Collingwood certainly was a historicist, for he defended the view that history is an autonomous discipline with a distinctive method and subject matter against the claim for methodological unity in the (...)
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  5. D. Timothy Goering (2013). Concepts, History and the Game of Giving and Asking for Reasons: A Defense of Conceptual History. Journal of the Philosophy of History 7 (3):426-452.
    This article offers a defense of the theoretical foundations of Conceptual History . While Conceptual History has successfully established itself as an historical discipline, details in the philosophy of language that underpin Conceptual History continue to be opaque. Specifically the definition of what constitutes a “basic concept” remains problematic. Reinhart Koselleck famously claimed that basic concepts are “more than words,” but he never spelled out how these abstract entities relate to words or can be subject to semantic transformation. I argue (...)
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  6. Isaac (2013). The Ethics of Humanistic Scholarship: On Knowledge and Acknowledgement. Journal of the Philosophy of History 7 (3):266-298.
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  7. Jouni-Matti Kuukkanen (2013). Representationalism and Non-Representationalism in Historiography. Journal of the Philosophy of History 7 (3):453-479.
    This paper examines how Hayden White and specifically Frank Ankersmit have attempted to develop the representationalist account of historiography. It is notable that both reject the copy theory of representation, but nevertheless commit to the idea that historiography produces representations. I argue that it would have been more advantageous to go yet one step further and reject representationalist language altogether on the level of narratives, as this implies that one is re-presenting a given object in one’s language in some sense. (...)
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  8. Isaac Nevo (2013). The Ethics of Humanistic Scholarship: On Knowledge and Acknowledgement. Journal of the Philosophy of History 7 (3):266-298.
    My aim in this paper is to characterize the professional good served by the humanities as various academic disciplines, particularly in relation to the general academic good, namely, the pursuit of knowledge in theoretical and scholarly research, and to evaluate the public and ethical dimension of that professional good and the constraints it imposes upon practitioners. My argument will be that the humanities aim at both knowledge of objective facts and acknowledgement of the human status of their subject matter, and (...)
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  9. Paul Redding (2013). The Necessity of History for Philosophy – Even Analytic Philosophy. Journal of the Philosophy of History 7 (3):299-325.
    Analytic philosophers are often said to be indifferent or even hostile to the history of philosophy – that is, not to the idea of history of philosophy as such, but regarded as a species of the genus philosophy rather than the genus history. Here it is argued that such an attitude is actually inconsistent with approaches within the philosophies of mind that are typical within analytic philosophy. It is suggested that the common “argument rather than pedigree” claim – that is, (...)
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  10. Chiel van den Akker (2013). Mink's Riddle of Narrative Truth. Journal of the Philosophy of History 7 (3):346-370.
    The problem how to ascertain the truth about the past is as old as history itself. But until the work of Louis Mink, no clear distinction was made between questions concerning the truth of statements on the past and questions concerning the truth of historical narratives as a whole. A narrative, Mink argues, is not simply a conjunction of statements on the past. Therefore its truth cannot be a function of the truth of its individual statements. The problem of narrative (...)
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  11. Eugen Zeleňák (2013). Using Goodman to Explore Historical Representation. Journal of the Philosophy of History 7 (3):371-395.
    Several authors argue that historical works should be viewed as relatively complex and autonomous constructions that are of interest in their own right. In the paper I follow this general approach to history and provide an analysis of historical representation inspired mainly by Nelson Goodman’s observations about symbols. In Languages of Art, Goodman makes a number of interesting claims regarding pictorial representation, exemplification and expression, which could be employed to clarify certain semantic questions of history. He convincingly shows that there (...)
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  12. Jason Blakely (2013). How Charles Taylor Philosophizes with History: A Review of Dilemmas and Connections. [REVIEW] Journal of the Philosophy of History 7 (2):231-243.
    Charles Taylor’s latest collection of essays, Dilemmas and Connections, is the most recent installment in his development of a grand history of the rise of a modern, secular age. In this review, I show how the historical narrative that defines Taylor’s late work is in continuity with his earlier hermeneutic commitments, while also allowing him to advance new inquiries into areas as diverse as secularism, religion, nationalism, and human rights discourse. I do this by not only providing a succinct summary (...)
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  13. Luca Gasparri (2013). Knowledge Indicative and Knowledge Conductive Consensus. Journal of the Philosophy of History 7 (2):162-182.
    A traditional proposition in the philosophy and the sociology of science wants that consensus between specialists of a scientific discipline is a reliable indicator of their access to genuine knowledge. In an interesting reassessment of this principle, Aviezer Tucker has analyzed the implications and the significance of this thesis in relation to historical research, and has established that parts of the historiographical community that display high degrees of consensus among their practitioners can be described in terms of the same relationship (...)
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  14. Zoltán Boldizsár Simon (2013). Experience as the Invisible Drive of Historical Writing. Journal of the Philosophy of History 7 (2):183-204.
    From time to time our tiny intellectual worlds are simultaneously shaken by big ideas – ideas that, however big they are, have their expiration-date. Such is the case with the idea of the impossibility to find life outside language. In this essay, I picture what I think is the current state of the philosophy of history after the so-called linguistic turn and what I think the direction is where the philosophy of history might be headed by taking into account the (...)
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  15. Admir Skodo (2013). Analytical Philosophy and the Philosophy of Intellectual History: A Critical Comparison and Interpretation. Journal of the Philosophy of History 7 (2):137-161.
    This article argues that the relationship between analytical philosophy and the philosophy of intellectual history is conceptually uneasy and even antagonistic once the general philosophical viewpoints, and some particular topics, of the two perspectives are drawn out and compared. The article critically compares the philosophies of Quentin Skinner and Mark Bevir with the philosophies of Ludwig Wittgenstein, J.L. Austin, W.V.O. Quine and Donald Davidson. Section I compares the way in which these two perspectives view the task of philosophy. Section II (...)
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  16. Ericka Tucker (2013). The Subject of History: Historical Subjectivity and Historical Science. Journal of the Philosophy of History 7 (2):205-229.
    In this paper, I show how the phenomenological and hermeneutic traditions and method converge on their treatment of the historical subject. Thinkers from both traditions claim that subjectivity is shaped by a historical worldview. Each tradition provides an account of how these worldviews are shaped, and thus how essentially historical subjective experience is molded. I argue that both traditions, although offering helpful ways of understanding the way history shapes subjectivity, go too far in their epistemic claims for the superiority of (...)
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  17. Eugen Zeleňák (2013). Semantics of Historical Representation in Terms of Aspects. Journal of the Philosophy of History 7 (2):244-256.
    In his latest book, Frank Ankersmit proposes an original theory of historical representation. In this review I focus on what I take to be his most important semantic points with respect to representation, meaning, truth, and reference. First, I provide a short summary of the book. Second, I explore his semantics in terms of aspects and compare it with a different account inspired by the Fregean notion of mode of presentation. As my examination shows, Ankersmit’s analysis faces the problem of (...)
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  18. Jonathan Owen Clark (2013). Aesthetic Experience, Subjective Historical Experience and the Problem of Constructivism. Journal of the Philosophy of History 7 (1):57-81.
    This article takes as its starting point the recent work of Frank Ankersmit on subjective historical experience. Such an experience, which Ankersmit describes as a ‘sudden obliteration of the rift between present and past’ is connected strongly with the Deweyan theory of art as experiential, which contains an account of aesthetic experience as affording a similar breakdown in the polarization of the subject and object of experience. The article shows how other ideas deriving from the phenomenological tradition and the philosophy (...)
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  19. James Adam Redfield (2013). Towards a History of Presence: Husserl's Intersubjectivity and Rouch's Montage. Journal of the Philosophy of History 7 (1):1-31.
    Abstract This paper proposes a new phenomenological approach to social history by clarifying, critiquing and developing key insights from Husserl’s late work. First, it clarifies how Husserl began to refute phenomenology’s so-called solipsism and ahistoricality by advancing a concept of history that integrates subjective, intersubjective and communal organizations of experience. This concept, his “history of presence”, can be called a “temporal mode of oriented constitution”. Its value is to show how a single recursive series of determinations organizes a diverse set (...)
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  20. James Adam Redfield (2013). Brill Online Books and Journals. Journal of the Philosophy of History 7 (1).
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  21. Adam Timmins (2013). Kuhnian Consensus & Historiography. Journal of the Philosophy of History 7 (1):82-105.
    Thomas Kuhn’s conception of paradigms has proved tremendously popular with the social sciences, in spite of the fact that Kuhn himself stopped using the concept by the time of his death; and the idea has come in for some fairly harsh treatment by philosophers of science. In this article I examine the historiography of the Second World War, paying specific attention to internal and external mechanisms of maintaining consensus – or lack therefore – within the field to see if anything (...)
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  22. Luciano Venezia (2013). Crucial Evidence: Hobbes on Contractual Obligation. Journal of the Philosophy of History 7 (1):106-135.
    The author introduces the notions of crucial argument and crucial evidence in the philosophy of intellectual history (broadly construed, including the history of political thought). He will use these concepts and take sides in an important controversy in Hobbes studies, namely whether Hobbes holds a prudential or a deontological theory of contractual obligation. Though there is textual evidence for both readings, he will argue that there is especially relevant evidence - crucial evidence - for interpreting Hobbes's account in a deontological (...)
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  23. Adrian Wilson (2013). Hayden White's “Theory of the Historical Work”: A Re-Examination. Journal of the Philosophy of History 7 (1):32-56.
    Hayden White’s Metahistory is best known for its “theory of tropes”; but Metahistory also put forward a distinct “theory of the historical work”, which has received rather less attention, and indeed has tended to be swallowed up by White’s tropology. This is a symptom of a wider problem, that the theory has been apprehended in paraphrase and synopsis rather than in the terms in which it was actually articulated. This paper seeks to redress these oversights through an exegetical analysis, embracing (...)
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