7 found

Year:

Forthcoming articles
  1. Samuel Camenzind (forthcoming). On Clone as Genetic Copy: Critique of a Metaphor. NanoEthics:1-15.
    A common feature of scientific and ethical debates is that clones are generally described and understood as “copies” or, more specifically defined, as “genetic copies.” The attempt of this paper is to question this widespread definition. It first argues that the terminology of “clone as copy” can only be understood as a metaphor, and therefore, a clone is not a “genetic copy” in a strict literal sense, but in a figurative one. Second, the copy metaphor has a normative component that (...)
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  2. Roberto Marchesini (forthcoming). Against Anthropocentrism. Non-Human Otherness and the Post-Human Project. NanoEthics:1-10.
    Technoscientific progress brings into question both anthropocentric epistemology and anthropocentric/humanistic ontology, which considers the human being as a self-constructing and self-sufficient entity. Even though, Darwinism recomposes the humanistic disjunction between reality and representation: by defining the human being as the result of an adaptive reflection, it reveals the idealistic character of post-Cartesian thought, which is the backbone of philosophical anthropocentrism. The non-human can be a dialogic entity if and only if it is considered not as “animal-by” but “animal-with”, that is, (...)
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  3. Elizabeth A. Pitts (forthcoming). Shaping Emerging Technologies: Governance, Innovation, Discourse. NanoEthics:1-3.
    This edited collection presents a selection of papers from the 2012 conference of the Society for the Study of Nanoscience and Emerging Technologies , an international network of scholars and practitioners who seek to understand and influence the relationships between technologies and socio-economic contexts. Like S.NET itself, the collection is heterogeneous: organized under the headings of Engagements, Regulatory Governance, Innovation, and Discourse, its sixteen chapters reflect a broad range of political, epistemological, and methodological standpoints. Thus, unlike many other conference publications, (...)
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  4. Anne Franciska Pusch (forthcoming). Splices: When Science Catches Up with Science Fiction. NanoEthics:1-19.
    This paper examines human-nonhuman splices from a multidisciplinary approach, involving bioengineering and literary studies. Splices are hybrid beings, created through gene-splicing—a process which combines the DNA of the two species, resulting in a hybrid or chimeric being. A current trend in biotechnological research is the use of spliced pigs for xenotransplantation. Hiromitsu Nakauchi’s pancreas study that splices pigs with human iPS [induced pluripotent stem] cells in order to grow human organs inside pigs is being compared to a highly similar case (...)
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  5. Colin Salter (forthcoming). Animals and War: Anthropocentrism and Technoscience. NanoEthics:1-11.
    We are at the crux of a return of animals to the battlefield. Framed as an improvement over current limitations of biomimetic devices, couplings of microelectrical mechanical systems with insect bodies are currently being designed and created in laboratories, with funding from military agencies. Moving beyond the external attachment of computerized ‘backpacks’, MEMS are being implanted into larval stages to allow for living tissue to envelop otherwise fragile circuitry and electronics: the creation of bioelectronic interfaces. The weaponization of animals, with (...)
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  6. Haico te Kulve, Kornelia Konrad, Carla Alvial Palavicino & Bart Walhout (forthcoming). Context Matters: Promises and Concerns Regarding Nanotechnologies for Water and Food Applications. NanoEthics.
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  7. Zipporah Weisberg (forthcoming). Biotechnology as End Game: Ontological and Ethical Collapse in the “Biotech Century. NanoEthics:1-16.
    I argue in this paper that animal biotechnology constitutes a dangerous ontological collapse between animals and the technical-economic apparatus. By ontological collapse, I mean the elimination of fundamental ontological tensions between embodied subjects and the principles of scientific, technological, and economic rationalization. Biotechnology imposes this collapse in various ways: by genetically “reprogramming” animals to serve as uniform commodities, by abstracting them into data and code, and, in some cases, by literally manipulating their movements with computer technologies. These and other forms (...)
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