14 found

Year:

Forthcoming articles
  1. L. Syd M. Johnson (forthcoming). Sport-Related Neurotrauma and Neuroprotection: Are Return-to-Play Protocols Justified by Paternalism? Neuroethics:1-12.
    Sport-related neurotrauma annually affects millions of athletes worldwide. The return-to-play protocol (RTP) is the dominant strategy adopted by sports leagues and organizations to manage one type of sport-related neurotrauma: concussions. RTPs establish guidelines for when athletes with concussions are to be removed from competition or practice, and when they can return. RTPs are intended to be neuroprotective, and to protect athletes from some of the harms of sport-related concussions, but there is athlete resistance to and noncompliance with RTPs. This prompts (...)
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  2. Sarah Malanowski & Nicholas Baima (forthcoming). On Treating Athletes with Banned Substances: The Relationship Between Mild Traumatic Brain Injury, Hypopituitarism, and Hormone Replacement Therapy. Neuroethics:1-12.
    Until recently, the problem of traumatic brain injury in sports and the problem of performance enhancement via hormone replacement have not been seen as related issues. However, recent evidence suggests that these two problems may actually interact in complex and previously underappreciated ways. A body of recent research has shown that traumatic brain injuries (TBI), at all ranges of severity, have a negative effect upon pituitary function, which results in diminished levels of several endogenous hormones, such as growth hormone and (...)
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  3. Laura Y. Cabrera, Nicholas S. Fitz & Peter B. Reiner (forthcoming). Reasons for Comfort and Discomfort with Pharmacological Enhancement of Cognitive, Affective, and Social Domains. Neuroethics:1-14.
    The debate over the propriety of cognitive enhancement evokes both enthusiasm and worry. To gain further insight into the reasons that people may have for endorsing or eschewing pharmacological enhancement , we used empirical tools to explore public attitudes towards PE of twelve cognitive, affective, and social domains . Participants from Canada and the United States were recruited using Mechanical Turk and were randomly assigned to read one vignette that described an individual who uses a pill to enhance a single (...)
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  4. Laura Y. Cabrera, Nicholas S. Fitz & Peter B. Reiner (forthcoming). Empirical Support for the Moral Salience of the Therapy-Enhancement Distinction in the Debate Over Cognitive, Affective and Social Enhancement. Neuroethics:1-14.
    The ambiguity regarding whether a given intervention is perceived as enhancement or as therapy might contribute to the angst that the public expresses with respect to endorsement of enhancement. We set out to develop empirical data that explored this. We used Amazon Mechanical Turk to recruit participants from Canada and the United States. Each individual was randomly assigned to read one vignette describing the use of a pill to enhance one of 12 cognitive, affective or social domains. The vignettes described (...)
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  5. Jeffrey G. Caron & Gordon A. Bloom (forthcoming). Ethical Issues Surrounding Concussions and Player Safety in Professional Ice Hockey. Neuroethics:1-9.
    Concussions in professional sports have received increased attention, which is partly attributable to evidence that found concussion incidence rates were much higher than previously thought (Echlin et al. Journal of Neurosurgical Focus 29:1–10, 2010). Further to this, professional hockey players articulated how their concussion symptoms affected their professional careers, interpersonal relationships, and qualities of life (Caron et al. Journal of Sport & Exercise Psychology 35:168–179, 2013). Researchers are beginning to associate multiple/repeated concussions with Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy (CTE), a structural brain (...)
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  6. Athina Demertzi, Eric Racine, Marie-Aurélie Bruno, Didier Ledoux, Olivia Gosseries, Audrey Vanhaudenhuyse, Marie Thonnard, Andrea Soddu, Gustave Moonen & Steven Laureys (forthcoming). Pain Perception in Disorders of Consciousness: Neuroscience, Clinical Care, and Ethics in Dialogue. Neuroethics.
  7. Veljko Dubljević (forthcoming). Neurostimulation Devices for Cognitive Enhancement: Toward a Comprehensive Regulatory Framework. Neuroethics:1-12.
    There is mounting evidence that non-invasive brain stimulation devices - transcranial direct current stimulation and transcranial magnetic stimulation could be used for cognitive enhancement. However, the regulatory environment surrounding such uses of stimulation devices is less clear than for stimulant drugs—a fact that has already been commercially exploited by several companies. In this paper, the mechanism of action, uses and adverse effects of non-invasive neurostimulation devices are reviewed, along with social and ethical challenges pertaining to their use as cognitive enhancements. (...)
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  8. Cynthia Forlini, Jan Schildmann, Patrik Roser, Radim Beranek & Jochen Vollmann (forthcoming). Knowledge, Experiences and Views of German University Students Toward Neuroenhancement: An Empirical-Ethical Analysis. Neuroethics:1-10.
    Across normative and empirical disciplines, considerable attention has been devoted to the prevalence and ethics of the non-medical use of prescription and illegal stimulants for neuroenhancement among students. A predominant assumption is that neuroenhancement is prevalent, in demand, and calls for appropriate policy action. In this paper, we present data on the prevalence, views and knowledge from a large sample of German students in three different universities (n = 1,026) and analyze the findings from a moral pragmatics perspective. The results (...)
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  9. Frédéric Gilbert (forthcoming). State of the Concussion Debate: From Sceptical to Alarmist Claims. Neuroethics:1-7.
    Current discussions about concussion in sport are based on a crucial epistemological question: whether or not we should believe that repetitive mild Traumatic Brain Injury causes Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy . This epistemological question is essential to understanding the ethics at stake in treating these cases: indeed, certain moral obligations turn on whether or not we believe that mTBI causes CTE. After discussing the main schools of thought, namely the CTE-sceptic position and the CTE-orthodox position , this article examines the concussion (...)
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  10. Frederic Gilbert (forthcoming). Self-Estrangement & Deep Brain Stimulation: Ethical Issues Related to Forced Explantation. Neuroethics:1-8.
    Although being generally safe, the use of Deep Brain Stimulation has been associated with a significant number of patients experiencing postoperative psychological and neurological harm within experimental trials . A proportion of these postoperative severe adverse effects have lead to the decision to medically prescribe device deactivation or removal. However, there is little debate in the literature as to what is in the patient’s best interest when device removal has been prescribed; in particular, what should be the conceptual approach to (...)
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  11. Annette Greenhow & Jocelyn East (forthcoming). Custodians of the Game: Ethical Considerations for Football Governing Bodies in Regulating Concussion Management. Neuroethics:1-18.
    Concussion in professional football is a topic that has generated a significant amount of interest for many years, partly due in recent times to the filing of the class-action litigation and the uncapped compensation injury fund and settlement involving 4,500 retired professional players and the National Football League (NFL). The proceedings claimed that the NFL, as the governing body of American football, failed in its duty to protect players’ health during their professional playing careers by exposing players to risks of (...)
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  12. Valerie Gray Hardcastle (forthcoming). Traumatic Brain Injury, Neuroscience, and the Legal System. Neuroethics:1-10.
    This essay addresses the question: What is the probative value of including neuroscience data in court cases where the defendant might have had a traumatic brain injury ? That is, this essay attempts to articulate how well we can connect scientific data and clinical test results to the demands of the Daubert standard in the United States’ court system, and, given the fact that neuroimaging is already being used in our courts, what, if anything, we should do about this fact. (...)
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  13. Brad Partridge & Wayne Hall (forthcoming). Repeated Head Injuries in Australia's Collision Sports Highlight Ethical and Evidential Gaps in Concussion Management Policies. Neuroethics:1-7.
    Head injuries (including concussion) are an inherent risk of participating in the major collision sports played in Australia (rugby league, rugby union and Australian Rules football). Protocols introduced by the governing bodies of these sports are ostensibly designed to improve player safety but do not prevent players suffering from repeated concussions. There is evidence that repeated traumatic brain injuries increase the risk of developing a number of long term problems but scientific and popular debates have largely focused on whether there (...)
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  14. Mladen Pecujlija, Gordana Misic-Pavkov & Maja Popovic (forthcoming). Personality and Blood Types Revisited: Case of Morality. Neuroethics:1-6.
    Although a large body of research exists concerning connections between personality traits and blood types, no studies can be found within the literature on the links between morality and one’s blood type. We have conducted research examining whether blood type has any impact on the degree to which moral foundations, according to Haidt , are observable in an individual. Our study focused on 240 adult male and female subjects, with an average age of 43.47 years; each group was based on (...)
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