Year:

Forthcoming articles
  1. Luca Ferrero (forthcoming). Decisions, Diachronic Autonomy, and the Division of Deliberative Labor. Philosophers' Imprint.
    1.1 A distinctive feature of our agency is the ability to bind our future conduct by making future-directed decisions. The bond of decisions is not one of mere physical constraint. A decision is not the trigger of some mechanism that takes control of the agent at the future time f and physically forces her to φ. When the agent φ’s out of her past decision to do so, she is in rational control of her conduct at the time of action.1 (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Michelle Kosch (forthcoming). Practical Deliberation and the Voice of Conscience in Fichte's 1798 System of Ethics. Philosophers' Imprint.
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Susanna Rinard (forthcoming). A Decision Theory for Imprecise Credences. Philosophers' Imprint.
    Those who model doxastic states with a set of probability functions, rather than a single function, face a pressing challenge: can they provide a plausible decision theory compatible with their view? Adam Elga (2010) and others claim that they cannot, and that the set of functions model should be rejected for this reason. This paper aims to answer this challenge. The key insight is that the set of functions model can be seen as an instance of the supervaluationist approach to (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Kieran Setiya (forthcoming). The Midlife Crisis. Philosophers' Imprint.
    Argues that philosophy can solve the midlife crisis, at least in one of its forms. This crisis turns on the exhaustibility of our ends. The solution is to value ends that are ‘atelic,’ so inexhaustible. Topics include: John Stuart Mill's nervous breakdown; Aristotle on the finality of the highest good; and Schopenhauer on the futility of desire.
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Nicholas Stang (forthcoming). Who's Afraid of Double Affection? Philosophers' Imprint.
    There is substantial textual evidence that Kant held the doctrine of double affection: subjects are causally affected both by things in themselves and by appearances. However, Kant commentators have been loath to attribute this view to him, for the doctrine of double affection is widely thought to face insuperable problems. I begin by explaining what I take to be the most serious problem faced by the doctrine of double affection: appearances cannot cause the very experience in virtue of which they (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Owen Ware (forthcoming). Rethinking Kant's Fact of Reason. Philosophers' Imprint.
    Kant’s doctrine of the Fact of Reason is one of the most perplexing aspects of his moral philosophy. The aim of this paper is to defend Kant’s doctrine from the common charge of dogmatism. My defense turns on a previously unexplored analogy to the notion of ‘matters of fact’ popularized by members of the Royal Society in the seventeenth century. In their work, ‘facts’ were beyond doubt, often referring to experimental effects one could witness first hand. While Kant uses the (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Joshua Wilburn (forthcoming). Courage and the Spirited Part of the Soul in Plato's Republic. Philosophers' Imprint.
    In this paper I argue that the Republic’s account of courage remains committed to the view that knowledge, or even true belief, about how it is best to act is sufficient for correct behavior. I thus defend continuity between the Republic’s account of courage and that found in the Protagoras. I suggest that in the Republic Plato attempts to identify a psychic source of stability for belief, the spirited part of the soul, whose function in the virtue of courage is (...)
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation