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Forthcoming articles
  1. J. A. Bell (forthcoming). Book Review: Can There Be a Philosophy of Archaeology? By William Harvey Krieger. [REVIEW] Philosophy of the Social Sciences.
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  2. Jørn Bjerre (forthcoming). A New Foundation for the Social Sciences? Searle's Misreading of Durkheim. Philosophy of the Social Sciences:0048393114525860.
    The aim of John Searle’s philosophy of society is to provide a foundation for the social sciences. Arguing that the study of social reality needs to be based on a philosophy of language, Searle claims that sociology has little to offer since no sociologist ever took language seriously. Attacking Durkheim head-on, Searle not only claims that Durkheim’s project differs from his own but also that Durkheim’s sociology has serious shortcomings. Opposing Searle, this paper argues that Durkheim’s account of social reality (...)
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  3. J. Agassi (forthcoming). Experts Within Democracy: The Turner Version. Philosophy of the Social Sciences:0048393114550807.
    Stephen Turner defends the sociopolitical role that experts—mainly but not only of the scientific kind—play in modern democratic society and explores means for increasing the rationality of their employment. Laudable though this is, at times Turner goes into more detail than democratic principles require; in his enthusiasm for rationality, he aims at levels of adequacy that are not always within the grasp of democracy.
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  4. M. Graziano (forthcoming). Individual and Social Preferences: Defending the Agent's Perspective Rather Than the Theoretician's. Philosophy of the Social Sciences:0048393114539851.
    Standard economic theory usually analyzes the decisions made by individuals as a rational process in which each individual has sound and consistent preferences and makes decisions according to the principle of subjective expected utility maximization. Starting from the pioneering work of Herbert Simon and the research of cognitive psychologists Kahneman and Tversky, the contributions provided by cognitive-behavioral theory have repeatedly shown that real agents make choices in a way that differs systematically from standard theory, hence highlighting its limits. Rather than (...)
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  5. I. Jarvie (forthcoming). Noble Savages, Ignoble Colleagues. Philosophy of the Social Sciences:0048393114550806.
    Chagnon narrates the ups and downs of his career, how he managed to document the basic ethnography of the Yanomamö of Amazonia, and the loss of scientific compass in American anthropology that brought a good deal of personal villification and the end of his research. The reviewer endorses the view that organized American anthropology is in an intellectually sorry state but argues that Chagnon’s anthropology of anthropology is lacking.
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  6. Joseph Agassi (forthcoming). Book Review: Paul Feyerabend: Ein Philosoph Aus Wien, Edited by F. Stadler and KR Fischer. [REVIEW] Philosophy of the Social Sciences.
  7. Mark Bevir (forthcoming). What Is Radical Historicism? Philosophy of the Social Sciences:0048393114531374.
    This article responds to Stephen Turner’s discussion of my article, “Historicism and Critique.” I emphasize that radical historicism consists of substantive philosophical commitments. One commitment is to a historicized epistemology that presents objective knowledge as a product of a comparison between rival webs of belief. Another commitment is to a historical ontology that presents aggregate concepts in the social sciences as inherently pragmatic. These substantive commitments provide a plausible basis for various forms of critique. They lead to analyses of genealogical (...)
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  8. Mark Bevir (forthcoming). Historicism and Critique. Philosophy of the Social Sciences:0048393114531370.
    This paper argues that historicism can provide substantive philosophical grounds for critical theory and various modes of critique. Unlike the developmental historicism that dominated the nineteenth century, we start from a radical historicism tied to nominalism, contingency, and contestability. This radical historicism is compatible with a commitment to truth claims, including the truth of historicism and the truth of particular genealogies and other accounts of the world. Genealogy can be viewed as radical historicism in its critical guise, denaturalizing the ideas (...)
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  9. Daniel Diermeiq Chong, Jack Knight & Lany Rothenbe (forthcoming). 76 Philosophy of the Social Sciences/March 1996. Philosophy of the Social Sciences.
  10. Dionysis Christias (forthcoming). A Sellarsian Approach to the Normativism-Antinormativism Controversy. Philosophy of the Social Sciences:0048393114530786.
    In this article, it is argued that Sellars’ view of normativity is the key for a proper resolution of the debate between normativism and anti-normativism, as the latter is described in Turner’s recent book Explaining the Normative. Drawing on an early Sellarsian article (“A Semantical Solution to the Mind-Body Problem”), I suggest that both normativism and anti-normativism (including Turner’s brand of the latter) are ultimately unsatisfactory positions and for the same reason: due to their failure to draw a distinction between (...)
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  11. Dave Elder-Vass (forthcoming). Disassembling Actor-Network Theory. Philosophy of the Social Sciences:0048393114525858.
    One of the strikingly iconoclastic features of actor-network theory is its juxtaposition of the claim to be a realist perspective with denials that supposedly natural phenomena existed before scientists “made them up.” This paper explains and criticizes such arguments in the work of Bruno Latour. By combining referent and reference in the concept of assemblages, Latour provides a superficially viable way to reconcile these apparently incompatible claims. This paper will argue, however, that this conflation of referent and reference leads Latour’s (...)
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  12. Brian Fay (forthcoming). Phenomenology and Social Inquiry: From Consciousness to Culture and Critique. Philosophy of the Social Sciences.
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  13. Steve Fuller (forthcoming). Studies and the Philosophy of Social Sciences. Philosophy of the Social Sciences.
  14. Andrew M. Koch (forthcoming). Book Review: The Century, by Alain Badiou. [REVIEW] Philosophy of the Social Sciences.
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  15. Tibor R. Machan (forthcoming). Book Review: James M. Buchanan, Why I, Too, Am Not a Conservative. [REVIEW] Philosophy of the Social Sciences.
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  16. Maksymilian Del Mar (forthcoming). Must We Play to Win? A Reply to Morgan. Philosophy of the Social Sciences:0048393114543988.
    This paper offers a brief reply to William Morgan’s critique of my review of Andrei Marmor’s Social Conventions (2009). Morgan’s principal critique is that I am wrong to think that the constitutive rules of games do not determine their aims and values. In particular, with regards to chess, Morgan argues that the rules of chess determine that the aim of playing chess is to win the game. I defend my position that one can play the game of chess without the (...)
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  17. Jamie Morgan (forthcoming). Seeing the Potential of Realism in Economics. Philosophy of the Social Sciences:0048393114530785.
    In this article, I clarify some of the key concepts and commitments of realist social ontology in economics. To do so, I make use of a recent critique of Lawson’s Reorienting Economics by Mohun and Veneziani. Their article provides a useful foil because responding to their critique allows us to emphasize that realism’s claims are more conditional and less controversial than one might otherwise anticipate. The basic claim is that ontology matters and that explicit recognition and consideration of ontological issues (...)
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  18. Lynn Hankinson Nelson (forthcoming). The Descent of Evolutionary Explanations: Darwinian Vestiges in the Social Sciences. Philosophy of the Social Sciences.
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  19. Piers Rawling (forthcoming). Decision Theory and Degree of Belief. Philosophy of the Social Sciences.
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  20. Sheldon Richmond (forthcoming). Book Review: Chasing Reality: Strife Over Realism, by Mario Bunge. [REVIEW] Philosophy of the Social Sciences.
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  21. Paul A. Roth (forthcoming). Beyond Understanding: The Career of the Concept of Understanding in the Human Sciences. Philosophy of the Social Sciences.
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  22. Javier González de Prado Salas & Jesús Zamora-Bonilla (forthcoming). Collective Actors Without Collective Minds: An Inferentialist Approach. Philosophy of the Social Sciences:0048393113520397.
    We present an inferentialist account of collective rationality and intentionality, according to which beliefs and other intentional states are understood in terms of the normative statuses attributed to, and undertaken by, the participants of a discursive practice—namely, their discursive or practical commitments and entitlements. Although these statuses are instituted by the performances and attitudes of the agents, they are not identified with any physical or psychological entity, process or relation. Therefore, we argue that inferentialism allows us to talk of collective (...)
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  23. Raphael Sassower (forthcoming). Book Review: The Elgar Companion to Economics and Philosophy, Edited by John B. Davis, Alain Marciano, and Jochen Runde. [REVIEW] Philosophy of the Social Sciences.
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  24. Akos Sivado (forthcoming). The Shape of Things to Come? Reflections on the Ontological Turn in Anthropology. Philosophy of the Social Sciences:0048393114524830.
    Martin Paleček and Mark Risjord have recently put forward a critical evaluation of the ontological turn in anthropological theory. According to this philosophically informed theory of ethnographic practice, certain insights of twentieth-century analytic philosophy should play a part in the methodological debates concerning anthropological fieldwork: most importantly, the denial of representationalism and the acceptance of the extended mind thesis. In this paper, I will attempt to evaluate the advantages and potential drawbacks of ontological anthropology—arguing that to become a true alternative (...)
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  25. David Teira (forthcoming). Book Review: The Logic of Social Research, by Arthur L. Stinchcombe. [REVIEW] Philosophy of the Social Sciences.
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  26. Leonidas Tsilipakos (forthcoming). Realist Social Theory and Its Losing Battle with Concepts. Philosophy of the Social Sciences:0048393114525859.
    This article attempts to evidence the idea that progress in social theory is impeded by central theoretical procedures embodying a host of conceptual mistakes. The article focuses on realist theorizing, examining both early realist work on science and contemporary critical realism, and demonstrates how conceptual procedures employed therein lead to error and confusion. The standard use of these procedures entails, among other things, that social theoretical debates tend to remain irresolvable and that understanding of what it takes to demonstrate a (...)
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  27. Stephen Turner (forthcoming). Not So Radical Historicism. Philosophy of the Social Sciences:0048393114531372.
    Mark Bevir raises the question of how genealogy, understood as a technique-based radical historicism, and the notion of the contingency of ideas, ground “critique.” His problem is to avoid the relativism of radical historicism in a way that allows for “critique” without appealing to non-radical historicist absolutisms of the kind that ground the notion of false consciousness. He does so by appealing to the notion of motivated irrationality, which he claims avoids the problem of relativism and the problems of “false (...)
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  28. Stephen P. Turner (forthcoming). Cause, the Persistence of Teleology, and the Origins of the Philosophy of Social Science. Philosophy of the Social Sciences.
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  29. Lars Udehn (forthcoming). The Methodology of Rational Choice. Philosophy of the Social Sciences.
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  30. Thomas Uebel (forthcoming). Twentieth-Century Philosophy of Social Science in the Analytic Tradition. Philosophy of the Social Sciences.
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  31. Elke Weik (forthcoming). A Return to the Enduring Features of Institutions A Process Ontology of Reproduction and Endurance. Philosophy of the Social Sciences:0048393114544035.
    Why and how do institutions endure? The most characteristic feature of institutions—their longevity—seems to be a neglected topic in current institutional analysis, which overwhelmingly is conducted as an analysis of institutional change. This article, in contrast, attempts to answer some basic questions about institutional endurance and reproduction, most notably how institutional reproduction can be distinguished from institutional endurance, how institutions manage to “bind” time and space, and which role structures “out of time and space” play in this. I explore the (...)
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  32. John Wettersten (forthcoming). Book Review: A Realist Philosophy of Social Science, by Peter T. Manicas. [REVIEW] Philosophy of the Social Sciences.
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