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Forthcoming articles
  1. J. A. Bell (forthcoming). Book Review: Can There Be a Philosophy of Archaeology? By William Harvey Krieger. [REVIEW] Philosophy of the Social Sciences.
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  2. Jørn Bjerre (forthcoming). A New Foundation for the Social Sciences? Searle's Misreading of Durkheim. Philosophy of the Social Sciences:0048393114525860.
    The aim of John Searle’s philosophy of society is to provide a foundation for the social sciences. Arguing that the study of social reality needs to be based on a philosophy of language, Searle claims that sociology has little to offer since no sociologist ever took language seriously. Attacking Durkheim head-on, Searle not only claims that Durkheim’s project differs from his own but also that Durkheim’s sociology has serious shortcomings. Opposing Searle, this paper argues that Durkheim’s account of social reality (...)
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  3. Christina E. Erneling (forthcoming). The Importance of Jean Piaget. Philosophy of the Social Sciences:0048393112454994.
    Jean Piaget, along with Sigmund Freud and B. F. Skinner, is one of the most influential thinkers in psychology. His influence on developmental and cognitive psychology, pedagogy and the so-called cognitive revolution is without doubt. The contributors to the book under review aim to show his past, contemporary as well as future relevance to important areas of psychology. I argue that they fail because they use Piaget’s own terminology, instead of explaining his ideas and relevance in a way accessible to (...)
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  4. Justin Lee (forthcoming). Genre-Appropriate Judgments of Qualitative Research. Philosophy of the Social Sciences:0048393113479142.
    Focusing on the production of lists of evaluative criteria has oversimplified our judgments of qualitative research. On the one hand, aspirations for global criteria applicable to “qualitative” or “interpretive” research have glossed over crucial analytic differences among specific types of inquiry. On the other hand, the methodological concern with appropriate ways of acquiring trustworthy data has led to an overly narrow proceduralism. I suggest that rational evaluations of analytic worth require the delineation of species of analytic tasks and the exercise (...)
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  5. Tobias Hansson Wahlberg (forthcoming). Elder-Vass on the Causal Power of Social Structures. Philosophy of the Social Sciences:0048393113500213.
    In this review essay, I examine the central tenets of sociologist Dave Elder-Vass’s recent contribution to social ontology, as put forth in his book The Causal Power of Social Structures: Emergence, Structure and Agency. Elder-Vass takes issue with ontological individualists and maintains that social structures exist and have causal powers in their own right. I argue that he fails to establish his main theses: he shows neither that social structures have causal powers “in their own right” (in any sense of (...)
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  6. Tobias Hansson Wahlberg (forthcoming). Causally Redundant Social Objects: Rejoinder to Elder-Vass. Philosophy of the Social Sciences:0048393114521364.
    In Elder-Vass’s response to my critical discussion of his social ontology, it is maintained (1) that a social object is not identical with but is merely composed of its suitably interrelated parts, (2) that a social object is necessarily indistinguishable in terms of its causal capacities from its interrelated parts, and (3) that ontological individualism lacks an adequate ontological justification. In this reply, I argue that in view of (1) the so-called redescription principle defended by Elder-Vass ought to be reformulated (...)
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  7. Joseph Agassi (forthcoming). Book Review: Paul Feyerabend: Ein Philosoph Aus Wien, Edited by F. Stadler and KR Fischer. [REVIEW] Philosophy of the Social Sciences.
  8. Bo Bengtsson & Nils Hertting (forthcoming). Generalization by Mechanism: Thin Rationality and Ideal-Type Analysis in Case Study Research. Philosophy of the Social Sciences:0048393113506495.
    Drawing general inferences on the basis of single-case and small-n studies is often seen as problematic. This article suggests a logic of generalization based on thinly rationalistic social mechanisms. Ideal-type mechanisms can be derived from empirical observations in one case and, based on the assumption of thin rationality, used as a generalizing bridge to other contexts with similar actor constellations. Thus, the “portability” builds on expectations about similar mechanisms operating in similar contexts. We present the general logic behind such “rationalistic (...)
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  9. Jack Birner (forthcoming). Popper and Hayek on Reason and Tradition. Philosophy of the Social Sciences:0048393112452793.
    Karl Popper and Friedrich von Hayek became close friends soon after they first met in the early 1930s. Ever since, they discussed their ideas intensively on many occasions. But even though an analysis of the origins and contents of their ideas and correspondence reveals a number of important and fundamental differences, they rarely criticize each other in their published work. The article analyzes in particular the different ideas they have on the role of reason in society and on rationalism and (...)
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  10. Kevin M. Cahill (forthcoming). Naturalism and the Friends of Understanding. Philosophy of the Social Sciences:0048393113506496.
    Paul Roth claims that “interpretivists” in the philosophy of social sciences like Charles Taylor assume a positivist caricature of natural science to motivate their arguments against naturalism in the social sciences. Roth argues that not only is adopting the view of meaning relied upon by those he sometimes refers to as the “friends of understanding” unmotivated once the critique of positivism has been taken on board, he argues further that Quine has shown why this “meaning realism” is unavailable in principle. (...)
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  11. Stephen T. Casper (forthcoming). Chickens and Eggs: A Commentary on Chris Renwick's “Completing the Circle of the Social Sciences? William Beveridge and Social Biology at London School of Economics During the 1930s”. Philosophy of the Social Sciences:0048393113480785.
    Why would anyone want there to be natural foundations for the social sciences? In a provocative essay exploring precisely that question, historian Chris Renwick uses an interwar debate featuring William Beveridge, Lancelot Hogben, and Friedrich Hayek to begin to imagine what might have been had such a program calling for biological knowledge to form the natural bases of the social sciences been realized at the London School of Economics. Yet perhaps Renwick grants too much attention to differences and “what-ifs” and (...)
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  12. Hyundeuk Cheon (forthcoming). In What Sense Is Scientific Knowledge Collective Knowledge? Philosophy of the Social Sciences:0048393113486523.
    By taking the collective character of scientific research seriously, some philosophers have claimed that scientific knowledge is indeed collective knowledge. However, there is little clarity on what exactly is meant by collective knowledge. In this article, I argue that there are two notions of collective knowledge that have not been well distinguished: irreducibly collective knowledge (ICK) and jointly committed knowledge (JCK). The two notions provide different conditions under which it is justified to ascribe knowledge to a group. It is argued (...)
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  13. Daniel Diermeiq Chong, Jack Knight & Lany Rothenbe (forthcoming). 76 Philosophy of the Social Sciences/March 1996. Philosophy of the Social Sciences.
  14. Denise Dollimore (forthcoming). Darwinism and Organizational Ecology: A Reply to Reydon and Scholz. Philosophy of the Social Sciences:0048393113510470.
    In an earlier article published in this journal I challenge Reydon and Scholz’s (2009) claim that Organizational Ecology is a non-Darwinian program. In this reply to Reydon and Scholz’s subsequent response, I clarify the difference between our two approaches denoted by an emphasis here on the careful application of core Darwinian principles and an insistence by Reydon and Scholz on direct biological analogies. On a substantive issue, they identify as being the principal problem for Organizational Ecology, namely, the inability to (...)
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  15. Denise E. Dollimore (forthcoming). Untangling the Conceptual Issues Raised in Reydon and Scholz's Critique of Organizational Ecology and Darwinian Populations. Philosophy of the Social Sciences:0048393113481066.
    Reydon and Scholz raise doubts about the Darwinian status of organizational ecology by arguing that Darwinian principles are not applicable to organizational populations. Although their critique of organizational ecology’s typological essentialism is correct, they go on to reject the Darwinian status of organizational populations. This paper claims that the replicator-interactor distinction raised in modern philosophy of biology but overlooked for discussion by Reydon and Scholz provides a way forward. It is possible to conceptualize evolving Darwinian populations providing that the inheritance (...)
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  16. Dave Elder-Vass (forthcoming). Redescription, Reduction, and Emergence: A Response to Tobias Hansson Wahlberg. Philosophy of the Social Sciences:0048393113515386.
    In response to Hansson Wahlberg, this paper argues, first, that he misunderstands the redescription principle developed in my book The Causal Power of Social Structures, and second, that his criticisms rest on an ontological individualism that is taken for granted but in fact lacks an adequate ontological justification of its own.
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  17. Dave Elder-Vass (forthcoming). Disassembling Actor-Network Theory. Philosophy of the Social Sciences:0048393114525858.
    One of the strikingly iconoclastic features of actor-network theory is its juxtaposition of the claim to be a realist perspective with denials that supposedly natural phenomena existed before scientists “made them up.” This paper explains and criticizes such arguments in the work of Bruno Latour. By combining referent and reference in the concept of assemblages, Latour provides a superficially viable way to reconcile these apparently incompatible claims. This paper will argue, however, that this conflation of referent and reference leads Latour’s (...)
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  18. Brian Fay (forthcoming). Phenomenology and Social Inquiry: From Consciousness to Culture and Critique. Philosophy of the Social Sciences.
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  19. Steve Fuller (forthcoming). Recovering Biology's Potential as a Science of Social Progress: Reply to Renwick. Philosophy of the Social Sciences:0048393113480784.
    Chris Renwick’s recent research into the fate of William Beveridge’s attempt to establish social biology as the foundational social science at the London School of Economics is history at its best by uncovering a moment in the past when decisions were taken comparable to ones being taken today. In this case, the issues concern the political and scientific foundations of the welfare state. By connecting Beveridge’s original reasoning to recruit Lancelot Hogben for the Rockefeller-sponsored social biology chair with his later (...)
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  20. Steve Fuller (forthcoming). Studies and the Philosophy of Social Sciences. Philosophy of the Social Sciences.
  21. Cyril Hédoin (forthcoming). Models in Economics Are Not (Always) Nomological Machines: A Pragmatic Approach to Economists' Modeling Practices. Philosophy of the Social Sciences:0048393112458715.
    This paper evaluates Nancy Cartwright’s critique of economic models. Cartwright argues that economics fails to build relevant “nomological machines” able to isolate capacities. In this paper, I contend that many economic models are not used as nomological machines. I give some evidence for this claim and build on an inferential and pragmatic approach to economic modeling. Modeling in economics responds to peculiar inferential norms where a “good” model is essentially a model that enhances our knowledge about possible worlds. As a (...)
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  22. Andrew M. Koch (forthcoming). Book Review: The Century, by Alain Badiou. [REVIEW] Philosophy of the Social Sciences.
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  23. Inkeri Koskinen (forthcoming). Critical Subjects Participatory Research Needs to Make Room for Debate. Philosophy of the Social Sciences:0048393114525857.
    Participatory methods in anthropology and other fields of cultural research aim at turning informants into collaborators or co-authors. Researchers generally accept the idea of different knowledge systems and continue the practice of avoiding the critical appraisal of alien systems that is common in ethnography. However, if informants are to be treated as collaborators, or ideally as colleagues, they become effectively a part of the research community. Helen Longino has formulated criteria according to which the objectivity of research communities can be (...)
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  24. Tibor R. Machan (forthcoming). Book Review: James M. Buchanan, Why I, Too, Am Not a Conservative. [REVIEW] Philosophy of the Social Sciences.
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  25. William J. Morgan (forthcoming). Games, Rules, and Conventions. Philosophy of the Social Sciences:0048393113500215.
    In a recent article in this journal, Del Mar offered two main criticisms of Marmor’s account of social conventions. The first took issue with Marmor’s claim that the constitutive rules of games and kindred social practices determine in an objective way their central aims and values; the second charged Marmor with scanting the historical context in which conventions do their important normative work in shaping the goals of games. I argue that Del Mar’s criticism of Marmor’s account of the normative (...)
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  26. Lynn Hankinson Nelson (forthcoming). The Descent of Evolutionary Explanations: Darwinian Vestiges in the Social Sciences. Philosophy of the Social Sciences.
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  27. Piers Rawling (forthcoming). Decision Theory and Degree of Belief. Philosophy of the Social Sciences.
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  28. Chris Renwick (forthcoming). Completing the Circle of the Social Sciences? William Beveridge and Social Biology at London School of Economics During the 1930s. Philosophy of the Social Sciences:0048393113480782.
    Much has been written about the relationship between biology and social science during the early twentieth century. However, discussion is often drawn toward a particular conception of eugenics, which tends to obscure our understanding of not only the wide range of intersections between biology and social science during the period but also their impact on subsequent developments. This paper draws attention to one of those intersections: the British economist and social reformer William Beveridge’s controversial efforts to establish a Department of (...)
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  29. Chris Renwick (forthcoming). Response to Steven T. Casper and Steve Fuller. Philosophy of the Social Sciences:0048393113480783.
    Stephen T. Casper and Steve Fuller’s commentaries on my paper “Completing Circle of the Social Sciences? William Beveridge and Social Biology at the London School of Economics during the 1930s” raises important questions about the historical entanglement of the political left, welfarism, biology, and social science. In this response, I clarify questions about my analysis of events at the London School of Economics in the early twentieth century and identify ways in which they are important in the present. I suggest (...)
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  30. Thomas A. C. Reydon & Markus Scholz (forthcoming). Darwinism and Organizational Ecology: A Case of Incompleteness or Incompatibility? Philosophy of the Social Sciences:0048393113491634.
    Recently, Dollimore criticized our claim that Organizational Ecology is not a Darwinian research program. She argued that Organizational Ecology is merely an incomplete Darwinian program and provided a suggestion as to how this incompleteness could be remedied. Here, we argue that Dollimore’s suggestion fails to remedy the principal problem that Organizational Ecology faces and that there are good reasons to think of the program as deeply incompatible with Darwinian thinking.
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  31. Sheldon Richmond (forthcoming). Book Review: Chasing Reality: Strife Over Realism, by Mario Bunge. [REVIEW] Philosophy of the Social Sciences.
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  32. Paul A. Roth (forthcoming). Beyond Understanding: The Career of the Concept of Understanding in the Human Sciences. Philosophy of the Social Sciences.
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  33. Javier González de Prado Salas & Jesús Zamora-Bonilla (forthcoming). Collective Actors Without Collective Minds: An Inferentialist Approach. Philosophy of the Social Sciences:0048393113520397.
    We present an inferentialist account of collective rationality and intentionality, according to which beliefs and other intentional states are understood in terms of the normative statuses attributed to, and undertaken by, the participants of a discursive practice—namely, their discursive or practical commitments and entitlements. Although these statuses are instituted by the performances and attitudes of the agents, they are not identified with any physical or psychological entity, process or relation. Therefore, we argue that inferentialism allows us to talk of collective (...)
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  34. Raphael Sassower (forthcoming). Book Review: The Elgar Companion to Economics and Philosophy, Edited by John B. Davis, Alain Marciano, and Jochen Runde. [REVIEW] Philosophy of the Social Sciences.
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  35. Mark Silcox (forthcoming). Psychological Trauma and the Simulated Self. Philosophy of the Social Sciences:0048393113485989.
    In the 1980s, there was a significant upsurge in diagnoses of Dissociative Identity Disorder. Ian Hacking suggests that the roots of this tendency lie in the excessive willingness of psychologists past and present to engage in the “psychologization of trauma.” I argue that Hacking makes some philosophically problematic assumptions about the putative threat to human autonomy that is posed by the increasing availability, attractiveness, and plausibility of various forms of simulated experience. I also suggest how a different set of axiological (...)
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  36. Akos Sivado (forthcoming). The Shape of Things to Come? Reflections on the Ontological Turn in Anthropology. Philosophy of the Social Sciences:0048393114524830.
    Martin Paleček and Mark Risjord have recently put forward a critical evaluation of the ontological turn in anthropological theory. According to this philosophically informed theory of ethnographic practice, certain insights of twentieth-century analytic philosophy should play a part in the methodological debates concerning anthropological fieldwork: most importantly, the denial of representationalism and the acceptance of the extended mind thesis. In this paper, I will attempt to evaluate the advantages and potential drawbacks of ontological anthropology—arguing that to become a true alternative (...)
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  37. David Teira (forthcoming). Book Review: The Logic of Social Research, by Arthur L. Stinchcombe. [REVIEW] Philosophy of the Social Sciences.
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  38. Leonidas Tsilipakos (forthcoming). Theoretical Procedures and Elder-Vass's Critical Realist Ontology. Philosophy of the Social Sciences:0048393112461055.
    This article scrutinizes some theoretical procedures prevalent in the philosophy of social science. These procedures are exemplified in Elder-Vass’s critical realism, which promises to place the social sciences on a sound ontological footing. The article focuses on the way that Elder-Vass’s general emergentist ontology is constituted and on the methods through which it is applied to society. It is contended that the ontology is not and could not be grounded in science and that its philosophical use distorts what it is (...)
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  39. Leonidas Tsilipakos (forthcoming). Realist Social Theory and Its Losing Battle with Concepts. Philosophy of the Social Sciences:0048393114525859.
    This article attempts to evidence the idea that progress in social theory is impeded by central theoretical procedures embodying a host of conceptual mistakes. The article focuses on realist theorizing, examining both early realist work on science and contemporary critical realism, and demonstrates how conceptual procedures employed therein lead to error and confusion. The standard use of these procedures entails, among other things, that social theoretical debates tend to remain irresolvable and that understanding of what it takes to demonstrate a (...)
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  40. Stephen Turner (forthcoming). Robert Merton and Dorothy Emmet: Deflated Functionalism and Structuralism. Philosophy of the Social Sciences:0048393114522516.
    Dorothy Emmet, in two books, one of which was based on extensive personal contact with Robert Merton and Columbia sociology, provides the closest thing we have to an authorized philosophical defense of Merton. It features a deflationary account of functionalism which dispenses with the idea of general teleological ends. What it replaces it with is an account of “structures” that have various consequences and that are maintained because, on Emmet’s account, of the mutual reinforcement of motives produced by the structure.
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  41. Stephen P. Turner (forthcoming). Cause, the Persistence of Teleology, and the Origins of the Philosophy of Social Science. Philosophy of the Social Sciences.
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  42. Lars Udehn (forthcoming). The Methodology of Rational Choice. Philosophy of the Social Sciences.
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  43. Thomas Uebel (forthcoming). Twentieth-Century Philosophy of Social Science in the Analytic Tradition. Philosophy of the Social Sciences.
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  44. John Wettersten (forthcoming). Book Review: A Realist Philosophy of Social Science, by Peter T. Manicas. [REVIEW] Philosophy of the Social Sciences.
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