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  1. Philip Boucher & Clair Gough (2012). Mapping the Ethical Landscape of Carbon Capture and Storage. Poiesis and Praxis 9 (3-4):249-270.
    This article describes a method of scoping for potential ethical contentions within a resource constrained research environment where actor participation and bottom–up analysis is precluded. Instead of reverting to a top–down analytical structure, a data-led process is devised. This imitates a bottom–up analytic structure in the absence of the direct participation of actors, culminating in the construction of a map of the ethical landscape; a high-resolution ethical matrix of coded interpretations of various actors’ ethical framings of the technology. Despite its (...)
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  2. Michael Decker (2012). Service Robots in the Mirror of Reflective Research. Poiesis and Praxis 9 (3-4):181-200.
    Service robotics has increasingly become the focus of reflective research on new technologies over the last decade. The current state of technology is characterized by prototypical robot systems developed for specific application scenarios outside factories. This has enabled context-based Science and Technology Studies and technology assessments of service robotic systems. This contribution describes the status quo of this reflective research as the starting point for interdisciplinary technology assessment (TA), taking account of TA studies and, in particular, of publications from the (...)
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  3. Michael Decker & Ulrike Henckel (2012). Service Robots on Their Way? First Steps of an Interdisciplinary Technology Assessment. Poiesis and Praxis 9 (3-4):177-180.
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  4. Thomas Dreier & Indra Spiecker Genannt Döhmann (2012). Legal Aspects of Service Robotics. Poiesis and Praxis 9 (3-4):201-217.
    The emergent use of service robots in more and more areas of social life raises a number of legal issues which have to be addressed in order to apply and adapt the existing legal framework to this new technology. The article provides an overview of law as a means to regulate and govern technology and discusses fundamental issues of the relationship between law and technology. It then goes on to address a number of relevant problems in the field of service (...)
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  5. Martin Fischer (2012). Interdisciplinary Technology Assessment of Service Robots: The Psychological/Work Science Perspective. Poiesis and Praxis 9 (3-4):231-248.
    The article sheds light on psychological and work science aspects of the design and utilization of service robots. An initial presentation of the characteristics of man–robot interaction is followed by a discussion of the principles of the division of functions between human beings and robots in service area work systems. The following aspects are to be considered: (1) the organisation of societal work (such as the different employment and professional profiles of service employees), (2) the work tasks to be performed (...)
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  6. Stephan Lingner & Katharina Mader (2012). Editors' Note. Poiesis and Praxis 9 (3-4):271-272.
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  7. Ingrid Ott (2012). Service Robotics: An Emergent Technology Field at the Interface Between Industry and Services. Poiesis and Praxis 9 (3-4):219-229.
    The paper at hand analyzes the economic implications of service robots as expected important future technology. The considerations are embedded into global trends, focusing on the interdependencies between services and industry not only in the context of the provision of services but already starting at the level of the innovation process. It is argued that due to the various interdependencies combined with heterogenous application fields, the resulting implications need to be contextualized. Concerning the net labor market effects, it is reasonable (...)
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  8. Diego Compagna (2012). Lost in Translation? The Dilemma of Alignment Within Participatory Technology Developments. Poiesis and Praxis 9 (1-2):125-143.
    As an instrument for participatory technology development, Scenario-Based Design offers significant potential for an early inclusion of future users. Over the course of a 3-year research project, this method was examined as a procedure for participatory technology development. Methods and instruments aimed at achieving a potential user’s participation, and the resulting cooperation of heterogeneous social groups can be seen as translation tools. Their purpose is to act as translators between different social fields and the specific knowledge associated with them. These (...)
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  9. Michael Decker & Torsten Fleischer (2012). Participation in 'Big Style': First Observations at the German Citizens' Dialogue on Future Technologies. [REVIEW] Poiesis and Praxis 9 (1-2):81-99.
    In 2010, the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research started a series of citizens’ dialogues on future technologies. In the context of the German history of public participation in technology-oriented policy making, these dialogues are unique for at least two reasons: The Federal Ministry retains the responsibility for the entire process and is heavily involved in its planning, organization and communication, and the number of participants and process elements is significantly higher than in most other participative events. The paper (...)
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  10. Erich Griessler (2012). One Size Fits All? On the Institutionalization of Participatory Technology Assessment and its Interconnection with National Ways of Policy-Making: The Cases of Switzerland and Austria. Poiesis and Praxis 9 (1-2):61-80.
    Science and technology policy is often confronted with issues that are both complex and controversial and which have to be decided upon in a delicate constellation of policy-makers, experts, stakeholders, non-governmental organizations and the public. One attempt to deal with such a complex problem is via citizen involvement. Participatory technology assessment (pTA) already goes back to several decades, and countries have made various experiences. While in some countries, governments established technology assessment organizations, which also included pTA in their methodological portfolio, (...)
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  11. Niklas Gudowsky, Walter Peissl, Mahshid Sotoudeh & Ulrike Bechtold (2012). Forward-Looking Activities: Incorporating Citizens' Visions. Poiesis and Praxis 9 (1-2):101-123.
    Looking back on the many prophets who tried to predict the future as if it were predetermined, at first sight any forward-looking activity is reminiscent of making predictions with a crystal ball. In contrast to fortune tellers, today’s exercises do not predict, but try to show different paths that an open future could take. A key motivation to undertake forward-looking activities is broadening the information basis for decision-makers to help them actively shape the future in a desired way. Experts, laypeople, (...)
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  12. Leonhard Hennen (2012). Why Do We Still Need Participatory Technology Assessment? Poiesis and Praxis 9 (1-2):27-41.
    The paper contributes to the current discussion on the role of participatory methods in the context of technology assessment (TA) and science and technology (S&T) governance. It is argued that TA has to be understood as a form of democratic policy consulting in the sense of the Habermasian model of a “pragmatist” relation of science and politics. This notion implies that public participation is an indispensable element of TA in the context of policy advice. Against this background, participatory TA (pTA) (...)
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  13. Elizabeth Minei & Jonathan Matusitz (2012). Cyberspace as a New Arena for Terroristic Propaganda: An Updated Examination. Poiesis and Praxis 9 (1-2):163-176.
    This paper analyzes the role of propaganda use in cyberterrorism. The main premise is that cyberterrorists display various semiotic gestures (e.g., the use of images and Internet videos) to communicate their intents to the public at large. In doing so, they communicate themes—these themes range from hate to anger. Cyberterrorism, then, is a form of theater or spectacle in which terrorists exploit cyberspace to trigger feelings of panic and overreaction in the target population. In many cases, this form of propaganda (...)
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  14. Michael Ornetzeder & Karen Kastenhofer (2012). Old Problems, New Directions and Upcoming Requirements in Participatory Technology Assessment. Poiesis and Praxis 9 (1-2):1-5.
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  15. Thomas Saretzki (2012). Legitimation Problems of Participatory Processes in Technology Assessment and Technology Policy. Poiesis and Praxis 9 (1-2):7-26.
    Since James Carroll (1971) made a strong case for “participatory technology”, scientists, engineers, policy-makers and the public at large have seen quite a number of different approaches to design and implement participatory processes in technology assessment and technology policy. As these participatory experiments and practices spread over the last two decades, one could easily get the impression that participation turned from a theoretical normative claim to a working practice that goes without saying. Looking beyond the well-known forerunners and considering the (...)
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  16. Peter Wehling (2012). From Invited to Uninvited Participation (and Back?): Rethinking Civil Society Engagement in Technology Assessment and Development. Poiesis and Praxis 9 (1-2):43-60.
    In recent years, citizens’ and civil society engagement with science and technology has become almost synonymous with participation in institutionally organized formats of participatory technology assessment (pTA) such as consensus conferences or stakeholder dialogues. Contrary to this view, it is argued in the article that beyond these standardized models of “invited” participation, there exist various forms of “uninvited” and independent civil society engagement, which frequently not only have more significant impact but are profoundly democratically legitimate as well. Using the two (...)
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  17. Elisabeth Weisser-Lohmann (2012). Ethical Aspects of Vulnerability in Research. Poiesis and Praxis 9 (1-2):157-162.
    In connection with research on humans, the term “vulnerability” is only appropriate to identify the special need for protection of certain sections of the population and individuals, if this term refers to the additional risk of certain groups of subjects. Authors who focus on the additional risk suffering of a subject group when defining vulnerability succeed in considering the specific worthiness of protection in a context-sensitive way. The attempt to define the risk–benefit assessment for vulnerable subject groups on a binding (...)
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  18. Michael Zschiesche (2012). Assessing Project Approval Procedures as Formalised Forms of Public Participation. Poiesis and Praxis 9 (1-2):145-156.
    Formalised public participation in project approval procedures is rarely addressed in technology assessment. Empirical data about public participation processes are taken into account even more rarely. This article explores the practice of public participation in infrastructure projects in the Federal Republic of Germany on the basis of empirical data from the period of 1990 to 2010. The author compares the empirical data about participation processes with the targets of the public participation and asks for the reasons for the lack of (...)
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  19. Mario Garitta (2012). Debi Ghate and Richard E. Ralston: Why Businessmen Need Philosophy: The Capitalist's Guide to the Ideas Behind Ayn Rand's Atlas Shrugged. Poiesis and Praxis 8 (4):197-201.
    The essays in this book are meant to serve as an introduction to those ideas of Ayn Rand, which are of particular relevance to business people. Rand was known as a spirited defender of the laissez-faire free enterprise system. It is less commonly known that Rand was also deeply committed to the centrality of the enterprise of philosophy for both public and private life. The essays in this book try to bridge the gap between these two aspects of Rand’s thought. (...)
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  20. Emma Palese (2012). Robots and Cyborgs: To Be or to Have a Body? Poiesis and Praxis 8 (4):191-196.
    Starting with service robotics and industrial robotics, this paper aims to suggest philosophical reflections about the relationship between body and machine, between man and technology in our contemporary world. From the massive use of the cell phone to the robots which apparently “feel” and show emotions like humans do. From the wearable exoskeleton to the prototype reproducing the artificial sense of touch, technological progress explodes to the extent of embodying itself in our nakedness. Robotics, indeed, is inspired by biology in (...)
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  21. Paul B. Thompson (2012). The Agricultural Ethics of Biofuels: Climate Ethics and Mitigation Arguments. [REVIEW] Poiesis and Praxis 8 (4):169-189.
    An environmental, climate mitigation rationale for research and development (R&D) on liquid transportation fuels derived from plants emerged among many scientists and engineers during the last decade. However, between 2006 and 2010, this climate ethic for pursuing biofuel became politically entangled and conceptually confused with rationales for encouraging greater use of plant-based ethanol that were both unconnected to climate ethics and potentially in conflict with the value-commitments providing a mitigation-oriented reason to promote and develop new and expanded sources of biofuel. (...)
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