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  1. Damon Boria (2013). Pricking Us Into Revolt? Vonnegut, DeLillo and Sartre's Hope for Literature. Sartre Studies International 19 (2):45-60.
    As seen in his enthusiastic praise of John Dos Passos's 1919 , Sartre evaluated literary works by how effectively they aim to play a role in fundamental social change. This essay has two goals. One is to show that Sartre's endorsement of committed literature is not undercut if literature fails to play a role in fundamental social change and the other is to show at least some of the ways in which committed literature is successful. Both goals are pursued through (...)
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  2. Alexis Chabot (2013). Sartre Et le Fantôme du Père. Sartre Studies International 19 (2):61-77.
    In , Sartre elevates the premature death of his father to the rank of a providential event which, by depriving him of a Super-Ego and relieving him of any legacy, consigned him to contingency and condemned him to be free. In this way, Sartre derives his uniqueness from this happy lack, this salutary void, i.e. a negated father, and casts himself in the role of an Aeneas liberated from the weight of his Anchises. Fatherless son, Sartre was nonetheless condemned to (...)
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  3. Danielle M. LaSusa (2013). Sartre's Spirit of Seriousness and the Bad Faith of “Must-See” Tourism. Sartre Studies International 19 (2):27-44.
    This article explores the Sartrean concept of the spirit of seriousness so as to better understand contemporary sightseeing tourism. Sartre's spirit of seriousness involves two central characteristics: the first understands values as transcendent, fixed objects, and the second—less acknowledged—understands material, physical objects as instantiating these transcendent values. I interpret the behavior of at least some contemporary tourists who travel to “mustsee” destinations as a subscription to both aspects of the spirit of seriousness and to a belief that the objects and (...)
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  4. Lior Levy (2013). Reflection, Memory and Selfhood in Jean-Paul Sartre's Early Philosophy. Sartre Studies International 19 (2):97-111.
    The article advances an interpretation of the self as an imaginary object. Focusing on the relationship between selfhood and memory in Sartre's The Transcendence of the Ego , I argue that Sartre offers useful resources for thinking about the self in terms of narratives. Against interpretations that hold that the ego misrepresents consciousness or distorts it, I argue that the constitution of the ego marks a radical transformation of the conscious field. To prove this point, I turn to the role (...)
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  5. Noémie Mayer (2013). Baudelaire_ Et _Mallarmé de JeanPaul Sartre Ou la Captivité Affective. Sartre Studies International 19 (2):78-96.
    Using an analysis of two of Sartre's biographies, and , I will show how freedom can be inverted into captivity in order to constitute an affective destiny. If every choice, act and affect of an individual is, through its “original project,” confined to a specific framework, the schema of freedom positing its choice of existence seems to resemble a circle of captivity: total freedom at the outset, and then a trapped freedom, limited by itself. At the basis of this alienating (...)
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  6. Christophe Perrin (2013). Du Poêle au Divan: Analyses Cartésiennes Et Psychanalyse Sartrienne. Sartre Studies International 19 (2):1-26.
    Although Sartre denounces Descartes' two principles, he nevertheless draws inspiration from him. No doubt this is close to being paradoxical; we shall have to be no less paradoxical in our explanation. For although the text entitled “Cartesian Freedom,” which introduces a volume of selections from Descartes, , confers some coherence on this apparent non-sense, once the texts surrounding this work have been taken into account, we have to conclude not only that this text predates , even though it was published (...)
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  7. Ronald E. Santoni (2013). Concerning the Ambivalence of Sartre on Violence: A Commentary/Rejoinder. Sartre Studies International 19 (2):112-128.
    In this article, I maintain that (1) Sartre's views on violence are ambivalent and (2) Sartre sometimes justifies violence. More specifically, I attempt to establish the misreadings by Michael Fleming and Marguerite LaCaze (on whom Fleming relies) of both my writing and Sartre's in these regards. Each, by arguing that, for Sartre, violence is “sometimes acceptable” or “functionally necessary” or “understandable,” but not morally justifiable, is ignoring Sartre's tendency at times to skirt the issue of justifiability by employing “weasel words” (...)
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  8. Patrick Engel (2013). Negativistic Ethics in Sartre. Sartre Studies International 19 (1):16-34.
    This article interprets Sartre's ethical reflections as leading to a negativistic ethics, that is to say an ethics that denies the possibility of conceiving a positive ideal that has to be attained, and therefore limits itself to the criticising of the negative in the existing world as the only way left for ethics. After a brief introduction into negativism, the article sets out the negativism of Being and Nothingness and the metaethical dilemma that the ontological work poses for a conception (...)
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  9. Patrick Ffrench (2013). Catastrophe, Adherence, Proximity Sartre (with Barthes) in the Cinema. Sartre Studies International 19 (1):35-54.
    Sartre's recollection, in Les Mots , of his first visit to the cinema is a multi-layered and ambivalent text through which Sartre proposes a number of interlocking arguments: concerning the contrast between the 'sacred' space of the theatre and the non-ceremonial space of the cinema, between the theatre as associated with paternal authority, and the cinema as associated with a clandestine bond with the mother. But the text also sets up a quasi-sociological account of the public Sartre encounters in the (...)
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  10. John H. Gillespie (2013). Sartre and God: A Spiritual Odyssey? Part 1. Sartre Studies International 19 (1):71-90.
    This two-part article examines whether Sartre's final interviews, recorded in L'Espoir maintenant [ Hope Now ], indicate a final turn to belief through an overview of his engagement with the idea of God throughout his career. In Part 1 we examine Sartre's early atheism, but note the pervasive nature of secularised Christian metaphors and concepts in his religion of letters and the centrality of man's desire to be God in Being and Nothingness . His theoretical writings seek to refute the (...)
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  11. Ruth Kitchen (2013). From Shame Towards an Ethics of Ambiguity. Sartre Studies International 19 (1):55-70.
    For Sartre, shame is not an ethical but an ontological experience. With this in mind, the article examines the philosophical connection between shame and ambiguity through analysis of the experiences of abortion and the Nazi Occupation. The article demonstrates how Beauvoir develops Sartre's ontological notion of shame into an ethical philosophy of ambiguity as a result of wartime experiences. It demonstrates how encounters with shame, abortion, ambiguity and Occupation life in Beauvoir's 1945 novel Le sang des autres elucidate and are (...)
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  12. Daniel O'Shiel (2013). Drives as Original Facticity. Sartre Studies International 19 (1):1-15.
    By introducing 'drives' into a Sartrean framework, 'being-in-itself' is interpreted as 'Nature as such', wherein instincts dominate. Being-for-itself, on the contrary, has an ontological nature diametrically opposed to this former – indeed, in the latter realm, through a fundamental process of 'nihilation' (Sartre's 'freedom') consciousness perpetually flees itself by transcending towards the world. However, a kernel of (our) nihilated Nature is left at the heart of this process, in the form of 'original facticity' that we here name drives. Drives are (...)
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  13. Paul Wallace, Patrick Engel, Annalisa Marinelli, Alfred Betschart, Daniel Herbert, Christian Skirke & Ruth Kitchen (2013). Sartre Societies. Sartre Studies International 19 (1):103-117.
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