Year:

  1. Julia Jorati (2013). Monadic Teleology Without Goodness and Without God. The Leibniz Review 23:43-72.
    Most interpreters think that for Leibniz, teleology is goodness-directedness. Explaining a monadic action teleologically, according to them, simply means explaining it in terms of the goodness of the state at which the agent aims. On some interpretations, the goodness at issue is always apparent goodness: an action is end-directed iff it aims at what appears good to the agent. On other interpretations, the goodness at issue is only sometimes apparent goodness and at other times merely objective goodness: some actions do (...)
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  2. Larry M. Jorgensen (2013). By Leaps and Bounds: Leibniz on Transcreation, Motion, and the Generation of Minds. The Leibniz Review 23:73-98.
    This paper traces Leibniz’s use of his neologism, “transcreation.” Leibniz coins the term in his 1676 discussions of motion, using it to identify a certain type of leap that is essential to motion. But Leibniz quickly dispensed with this theory of motion, arguing instead that “nature never acts by leaps,” and the term “transcreation” fell out of use. However, Leibniz surprisingly revived the term in 1709 in his discussion of the generation of rational beings. By contrasting the way Leibniz uses (...)
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  3. Martin Lin (2013). Spinoza’s Metaphysics: Substance and Thought by Yitzhak Y. Melamed. The Leibniz Review 23:195-205.
  4. Stephen Puryear (2013). The Leibniz-De Volder Correspondence, with Selections From the Correspondence Between Leibniz and Johann Bernoulli, Ed. P. Lodge. [REVIEW] The Leibniz Review 23:165-169.
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  5. Richard T. W. Arthur (2013). Massimo Mugnai and the Study of Leibniz. The Leibniz Review 23:1-5.
    This essay is an appreciation of Massimo Mugnai’s many contributions to Leibniz scholarship, as well as to the history of logic and history of philosophy more generally.
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  6. Richard T. W. Arthur (2013). Leibniz’s Mechanical Principles : Commentary and Translation. The Leibniz Review 23:101-105.
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  7. Irena Backus (2013). Leibniz Als Sammler Und Herausgeber Historischer Quellen, Ed. N. Gädeke. The Leibniz Review 23:133-139.
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  8. Samuel Levey (2013). Leibniz, God and Necessity, by Michael Griffin. The Leibniz Review 23:171-185.
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  9. Lærke (2013). Ignorantia Inflat Leibniz, Huet, and the Critique of the Cartesian Spirit. The Leibniz Review 23:13-42.
    This article explores the relations between Leibniz and the French erudite Pierre-Daniel Huet in the context of their shared anti-Cartesianism. After an introductory survey of the available commentaries and primary texts, I focus on a publication by Leibniz in the Journal des sçavans from 1693, where he fully endorses the critique of Descartes developed by Huet in his 1689 Censura philosophiae cartesianae. Next, I provide some indications as to Leibniz’s motivations behind this public approval of Huet. First, I show how (...)
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  10. Colin Marshall (2013). Spinoza’s Metaphysics: Substance and Thought, by Yitzhak Melamed. The Leibniz Review 23:187-194.
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  11. Yitzhak Melamed (2013). Reply to Colin Marshall and Martin Lin. The Leibniz Review 23:207-222.
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  12. Cnrs Mogens Lærke (2013). Ignorantia Inflat Leibniz, Huet, and the Critique of the Cartesian Spirit. The Leibniz Review 23:13-42.
    This article explores the relations between Leibniz and the French erudite Pierre-Daniel Huet in the context of their shared anti-Cartesianism. After an introductory survey of the available commentaries and primary texts, I focus on a publication by Leibniz in the Journal des sçavans from 1693, where he fully endorses the critique of Descartes developed by Huet in his 1689 Censura philosophiae cartesianae. Next, I provide some indications as to Leibniz’s motivations behind this public approval of Huet. First, I show how (...)
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  13. Nicholas Rescher (2013). Leibniz and the English Language. The Leibniz Review 23:7-11.
    The only extensive study that Leibniz ever made of an English-language book, his New Essays on John Locke’s 1690 Essay Concerning Human Understanding, was based not on the English original, but on a French translation. And his correspondence with English scholars and political figures was invariably written in Latin or French. In consequence the impression is widespread among Anglophone Leibnizians that he did not know English. However, considerable evidence has come to light in recent years that Leibniz did somehow manage (...)
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  14. Patrick Riley (2013). Brückenschläge: Daniel Ernst Jablonski Im Europa der Frühaufklärung, Ed. H. Rudolph. The Leibniz Review 23:141-142.
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  15. Patrick Riley (2013). G. W. Leibniz, Sämtliche Schriften Und Briefe, Reihe I, Allgemeiner Politischer Und Historischer Briefwechsel, Band 23. The Leibniz Review 23:143-164.
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  16. Justin E. H. Smith (2013). Reply to Sarah Tietz. The Leibniz Review 23:129-131.
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  17. Sarah Tietz (2013). Divine Machines: Leibniz and the Sciences of Life, by Justin E. H. Smith. [REVIEW] The Leibniz Review 23:119-128.
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