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2016-04-24
I told this philosophy joke to some friends, and they think I should tell it to philosophers, but I wonder whether it is already known. Just in case not:

How many homunculi does it take to change a lightbulb?
An infinite number, getting smaller and smaller.

2016-04-22
Quantum Computing: Myth or Reality?

"What I like most in science is science-fiction"
Unknown from the web.

Schrödinger's cat is probably one of the most famous pets in history, right beside Cerberus and Pegasus. I must confess that quantum computing remains largely a mystery, and while researching the subject I could not but notice the lack of any concrete information about what it really entails.
Take the concept of qubit. It has mathematically been defined, and, as far as I can see, mathematicians agree on the definition. Which is certainly good enough for me. But then I wonder, how would a quantum gate or circuit look like?
Well, if you ask this question on the Internet, you get treated to more mathematical formulas.
A very intriguing concept is that of superposition. I have great difficulty in grasping the reality behind it. Let us assume that a bit can be both 1 and 0 at the same time. What good will it do to us if we are not able to get a clear answer after reading it? In other words ... (read more)
Latest replies: Permanent link: http://philpapers.org/post/14978 Reply

2016-04-19
Freedom of Speech and the Right to Insult

Turkish President Erdogan has filed a complaint against a German comedian who read a poem depicting him committing  sexual acts with animals. A vast majority of the German population consider this as an inalienable right to free-speech. Me? I am certainly not a fan of Erdogan, but I agree with him in this special case. The "comedian" should be legally prosecuted. I must add that I find that journalists detained in Turkish prisons should simply be freed. Criticism is certainly a democratic right. So, what is the difference between the German "perpetrator", and the Turkish victims?
Thousands of people, if not millions, throughout history, have given their lives for the freedom to speak freely. And to this day, hundreds are still dying every day for that same right. What I find absolutely disgusting are parasites who abuse this right and not only seek but also get protection from the Law. And then I wonder. Did all those people in the past die for th ... (read more)
Latest replies: Permanent link: http://philpapers.org/post/14930 Reply

2016-04-12
If you have any thoughts, comments or questions about this paper, let me know!

2016-04-12
If you have any thoughts, comments or questions about this paper, let me know!

2016-04-12
If you have any thoughts, comments or questions about this paper, let me know!

2016-04-12
If you have any thoughts, comments or questions about this paper, let me know!
Latest replies: Permanent link: http://philpapers.org/post/14842 Reply

2016-04-06
I recently had a paper on a novel approach to the hard problem rejected after getting to the minor revision stage at a Leiter-ranked journal (disagreement with the referee on a single issue).

I accomplished this with no formal training in philosophy (although I am highly educated in other fields). I understand that making it to the minor revision stage (much less getting published) at a respected journal with no formal training in the field is so rare as to effectively be unheard of. 

Since I am not in academia, the only feedback I have received on the paper are the referee reports. I have resubmitted to another journal but I would greatly value feedback from a prof/postdoc. In that respect, if anyone is interested, please let me know and I will send you a link to the paper. Given the unique circumstances, I would prefer not to post a link to/discuss the paper here so as not to prejudice the ongoing/any future reviews. I would offer to credit any feedback/suggestions that are incorporated ... (read more)

Latest replies: Permanent link: http://philpapers.org/post/14594 Reply

2016-03-29
My alarm bells went off seeing mention of Al Qaeda and 9/11 in an abstract from 1999. Turns out the DOI and abstract here are not for Keeley's 1999 paper, but for an SSRN working paper by Sunstein and Vermeule from 2008 (which doesn't seem to have a separate philpapers entry). I can delete the abstract from this entry, but I can't find a way to edit the DOI.

What's the best thing for a user like me to do? I could create another entry with the correct DOI (which is 10.2307/2564659)&copy over the information from this one, then edit this one to describe the Sunstein and Vermeule paper, but I feel like there's got to be a better way--especially since that would distort the download stats for the two papers.
Latest replies: Permanent link: http://philpapers.org/post/14402 Reply

2016-03-29
The challenge is very simple: Give a full and explicit proof of the existence of Infinity.There is only one restriction: it is not allowed to refer to "proofs" already known. If you believe Cantor has proved Infinity, you cannot just refer to his work, but have to state explicitly what and how you think he has proved it.
I wish you luck.
Latest replies: Permanent link: http://philpapers.org/post/14398 Reply

2016-03-22

Studies aimed at understanding the construction and probable location of the consciousness (or self) from the biofield emissions at a dying condition?

Are there any recent investigations carried out in connection with biophoton emissions from a dying person? or, at least, do we have investigations on various bio-emissions (which includes EM spectral emissions over various bandwidths) associated with a dying condition? Also, any recent Gas Discharge Visualization (GDV) studies on a dying person?

Suppose, if we are able to detect certain bio-emissions (having the specific bandwidth) other than in the Infra-red (IR) region (which is usually connected to the metabolic activity), then we can associate these emission frequencies to the fundamental oscillations or modes at which communication (both inter- and intra-) happens. These modes can then act as the interface between mind (non-material aspect), body (material aspect) and the environment.

If we want to understand how a material brain coul ... (read more)


2016-03-22
[The idea is to start with a concrete situation, like a mother preparing a meal for an extended family, and discovering numbers in their different form: natural, whole, negative, rational (including radicals), real, imaginary, complex, etc...

Mother is of course an archetype and can include many generations of mothers. There are 12 family members and, to make things simpler, they all eat the same amount of food.  Some kind of grain.]

1) Mother knows how much grain she needs to cook for all of them. She just keeps taking handfuls of grain and putting them in the cooking pan until she is satisfied that it will be enough. She has no way of knowing or naming exact quantities. Her experience as a cook is sufficient for the task. She can also enumerate each family member by name, including herself, while grabbing grain, since she also knows how much each member approximately eats. To be sure she does not forget anyone, or count somebody twice, she starts with Father, then herself, and then with ... (read more)
Latest replies: Permanent link: http://philpapers.org/post/14270 Reply

2016-03-22
Concerning his recent paper I agree almost 100% but I am more receptive to IIT than Curello. I am arguing in a new paper that it addresses some aspects of consciousness, but not all.
The main problem that Tononi and Koch seem entirely unaware of is that a theory of consciousness that does not address intelligence cannot be a theory of consciousness at all.

Regards,

Eray Ozkural, PhD
Latest replies: Permanent link: http://philpapers.org/post/14266 Reply

2016-03-07
For your review, discussion, and to provide feedback on this paper I have submitted. Thank you. Tim

2016-03-07
How are we to go about evaluating the meaning of a work of art, which in our case is a subset, namely a literary work? In the middle of the 20th century literary criticism was very dependent on the concept of author intention, the notion that the meaning of a literary work was found in the author's view of it, either when it was written or later. This view suggested that authorial intent is paramount in the interpretation of a work's meaning.

This concept was challenged by a revolutionary paper published in 1946 by W.K. Wimsatt and Monroe Beardsley entitled “The Intentional Fallacy”. The notion behind this essay was that the meaning of the work was not necessarily what was in the writer's mind at the time of writing, or later, but was more to do with what the readers of a work see it as. This argument was advanced by American New Criticism amongst others.

The tenets of "The Intentional Fallacy" have been questioned by a number of people. For example Hirsch has suggested that t ... (read more)
Latest replies: Permanent link: http://philpapers.org/post/13962 Reply

2016-02-27
Most, if not all the early Church Fathers were schooled in Greek Philosophy. What principles and practices of Christianity would have clashed with their worldviews in general?

2016-02-27
My reasons:
1. Accoding to relative information formula I=log[P(ei|hj)/P(ei)] in classical information theory, if P(ei|hj)2. A lie or wrong prediction is worse than a tautology or contradiction. For example, after master tells kitchener  "Three guests will come to have dinner", actually no guest comes. The master's saying is worse than a tautology or contradiction, because it will bring loss. Yet, according a tautology or contradiction, the kitchener either does nothing or asks for better prediction. 
3. If we code P(E|hj) according to a wrong prabability prediction or likelihood, such as P(E| hk is true) (actually hypothesis hk is wrong), the average codeword length will be H(E|hk)=- sum i P(ei|hj)logP(ei | hk is true)>H(E|hj)- sum i P(ei|hj)logP(ei|hj), which means that the saved average codeword length is negative.

I modify the formula  I=log[P(ei|hj)/P(ei)] into I(ei;hj)=log[P(ei|hj is true)/P(ei)]=log[T(hj|ei)/T(hj) 
where  P is statistical probability, and T(hj|ei) is the true value of p ... (read more)
Latest replies: Permanent link: http://philpapers.org/post/13902 Reply

2016-02-27
Christianity did not emerge from a vacuum. The Hebrews were the first Christians. Before Christianity it was likely that they practiced or were familiar with Judaism. Some adherents of Judaism during the 2nd century BC to the 1st century AD totally rejected Greek philosophy which is known as Hellenism. Others embraced Hellenism in different degrees. The Old Testament was written in Hebrew and Aramaic, the language of Judaism. The New Testament, which espoused Christianity was transmitted in Koine Greek, the language of the Hellenists.  The descendants of the Hebrews are called Jews in the New Testament. Why did the Jews en bloc (or for the most part) reject Jesus Christ, the central figure of Christianity, upon whose teaching the religion was founded? For these Jews, the Messiah had not yet come. Most Jews today still believe that the promised Messiah of the Old Testament has not yet come. If you were a Jew in the 1st century, would you have accepted Jesus Christ?
Latest replies: Permanent link: http://philpapers.org/post/13894 Reply

2016-02-22
Would like some responses on these thoughts:

Space is the negation of substance, of reality, of being; thus, space is nothing, unreality, non-being.

Can anyone see nothing or imagine nothing? Yes, for space is nothing. To see nothing means to see no thing.

Consequently, we do not see things in space; we see things alone and their negation, viz.,space.

Things do not occupy space. For then, what does space occupy?

Things negate space, i.e. nothing.

Take a plastic bottle of 1 ltr. How much water can it contain? 1 ltr. Squeeze it, can it contain 1 ltr of water? No, why? Because the bottle being squeezed increasingly negates space allowing less negatability for another (meaning that negatibility for it increases at the same time). For perfect density = perfect negation of space; less density = less negation of space. That which is negated cannot be again negated without the destruction of that which negates it.

Zero = infinite; therefore, space = infinite; it can be infinitely negated by things wi ... (read more)
Latest replies: Permanent link: http://philpapers.org/post/13802 Reply

2016-02-16
Preliminary Observation
Set Theory is believed to be the foundation of Mathematics, the theory from which everything mathematical would be deduced. It sounds like a metaphysical prejudice to my ears: how could a mathematical theory ever found mathematics? What would then found Set Theory itself? Its axioms? They are all of a mathematical nature, so that would not work. We would need non-mathematical axioms to found Set Theory, before it ever could found Mathematics. Is that even possible? This is what I intend to research in this thread. But please, bear with me, there is no royal road to the foundation of the foundation of Mathematics. If there even exists such a thing.

Axiom of Choice and Well-Ordering Principle
The universal consensus is that WOP relies on AC. I have the strong impression that it is in fact the other way around.
When I look at the incredibly complicated "proof that every set can be well-ordered" by Zermelo (1904), I cannot escape the feeling that he would not be ab ... (read more)
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