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2016-03-07
How are we to go about evaluating the meaning of a work of art, which in our case is a subset, namely a literary work? In the middle of the 20th century literary criticism was very dependent on the concept of author intention, the notion that the meaning of a literary work was found in the author's view of it, either when it was written or later. This view suggested that authorial intent is paramount in the interpretation of a work's meaning.

This concept was challenged by a revolutionary paper published in 1946 by W.K. Wimsatt and Monroe Beardsley entitled “The Intentional Fallacy”. The notion behind this essay was that the meaning of the work was not necessarily what was in the writer's mind at the time of writing, or later, but was more to do with what the readers of a work see it as. This argument was advanced by American New Criticism amongst others.

The tenets of "The Intentional Fallacy" have been questioned by a number of people. For example Hirsch has suggested that t ... (read more)
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2015-04-10
Does anyone have any information of a good source/information on Dorothy Parker? (author)I am looking at her in comparison to Friday Kahlo's journal writings.
Would be grateful for any help.

2015-01-28
I am trying to start a discussion for teaching INSEPARABILITY OF LOGIC AND ETHICS. A COLLEAGUE WROTE: I'm going to be teaching your "Inseparability of Logic and Ethics" in a couple weeks. I was wondering if you had any tips on doing so or thoughts about points to emphasize. I've always loved the paper and found your pedagogical techniques quite helpful.
POST YOUR ADVICE AND I WILL FORWARD IT .
MY ADVICE TO MY COLLEAGUE: First, before assigning the paper to be read, ask the students to look up “ethics” and “logic” in a dictionary or other reference work and then to write a paragraph on what the two have to do with each other. Second, after the students were supposed to have read the paper, ask them what they got out of it. Just let them talk and prompt them where necessary. No contentiousness. Third, read the first page aloud to them and see what happens. As you go read chunks aloud and ask questions—just like I did teaching you Tarski’s truth-definition paper. Fourth, go around the clas ... (read more)

2014-12-19

► JOHN CORCORAN AND WILLIAM FRANK, Cosmic Justice Hypotheses.

  This applied-logic lecture builds on [1] arguing that character traits fostered by logic serve clarity and understanding in ethics, confirming hopeful views of Alfred Tarski [2, Preface, and personal communication].

  Hypotheses in one strict usage are propositions not known to be true and not known to be false or—more loosely—propositions so considered for discussion purposes [1, p. 38].

   Logic studies hypotheses by determining their implications (propositions they imply) and their implicants (propositions that imply them). Logic also studies hypotheses by seeing how variations affect implications and implicants. People versed in logical methods are more inclined to enjoy working with hypotheses and less inclined to dismiss them or to accept them without sufficient evidence.

  Cosmic Justice Hypotheses (CJHs), such as “in the fullness of time every act will be rewarded or punished in exact proportion to its goodness or badness ... (read more)


2012-06-25
I am working on a paper on photography and memory. The subject is beyond my formal training. I was trained, broadly, in political economy, philosophy of social science and international affairs. In an earlier incarnation, I also worked as a journalist (reporter and photojournalist) and have some formal experience... Would anyone care to read a draft paper and comment or make suggestions, please. I can have the first draft available by the middle of July. It is incomplete at the moment, as I have other work (to pay the rent). Thanks Ismail Lagardien

2010-05-27
We have many framing devices in the arts, and one thing that is consistent in their use is a metacognitive process which they seem to stimulate. We see the contents of a picture, and while we are occupied with processing these details we might come across another picture inside it, or we might see an artist painting a picture (as we do in Velazquez's Las Meninas); or there might be a mirror in the depicted space, all of these framing devices allow us to step out of our current thought process, and become aware of it, or self aware of our viewing. How fair is it to say that visual experience can be ordered in the form of HOTs as framing devices in the visual field, or that HOTs can be visualised in this way? 
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