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2014-02-23
A very popular text book, Sensation and Perception by Goldstein, states the following:
"Light reflected from objects in the environment enters the eye through the pupil and is focused by the cornea and lens to form sharp images of the objects on the retina."
This is a common view that I have found explicitly expressed in any book or article I have read on vision.
The assumption of a retinal image poses at least two problems:
1) 2D array vs 3D world. How come we see objects in 3D while the retinal image is 2D?
2) The Inverse Problem: different objects have the same projection on the retina, but still we have no difficulty distinguishing between them.
I would like to add a third one. The retinal blind spot.
The explanations I have found have me baffled. The ingenious tests by Ramachandran and others, that purport to prove the existence of the blind spot, only add to my confusion. I have tried to find an answer to a similar problem, Tunnel Vision (Retinitis Pigmentosa), but I did not get any far ... (read more)
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2012-06-25
I am working on a paper on photography and memory. The subject is beyond my formal training. I was trained, broadly, in political economy, philosophy of social science and international affairs. In an earlier incarnation, I also worked as a journalist (reporter and photojournalist) and have some formal experience... Would anyone care to read a draft paper and comment or make suggestions, please. I can have the first draft available by the middle of July. It is incomplete at the moment, as I have other work (to pay the rent). Thanks Ismail Lagardien

2010-05-27
We have many framing devices in the arts, and one thing that is consistent in their use is a metacognitive process which they seem to stimulate. We see the contents of a picture, and while we are occupied with processing these details we might come across another picture inside it, or we might see an artist painting a picture (as we do in Velazquez's Las Meninas); or there might be a mirror in the depicted space, all of these framing devices allow us to step out of our current thought process, and become aware of it, or self aware of our viewing. How fair is it to say that visual experience can be ordered in the form of HOTs as framing devices in the visual field, or that HOTs can be visualised in this way? 
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