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  1. David Albertson (2012). A Late Medieval Reaction to Thierry of Chartress (D. 1157) Philosophy: The Anti-Platonist Argument of the Anonymous Fundamentum Naturae. Vivarium 50 (1):53-84.
    Abstract An anonymous manuscript from the fourteenth or early fifteenth century, recently discovered, apparently transmitted Thierry of Chartres's philosophical theology to Nicholas of Cusa around 1440. Yet the author of the treatise is not endorsing Thierry's views, as both Cusanus and modern readers have assumed, but in fact is writing in order to refute them. Curiously the author never mentions Thierry's best known triad of unitas, aequalitas and conexio . But a careful comparison of the structure of the author's argument (...)
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  2. Pauli Annala (1997). The Function of the Formae Nativae in the Refinement Process of Matter: A Study of Bernard of Chartres's Concept of Matter. Vivarium 35 (1):1-20.
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  3. Rüdiger Arnzen (2002). Ausgewählte Literatur in »westlichen« Sprachen für das Studium der mittelalterlichen Philosophie in arabischer und persischer Sprache. Bochumer Philosophisches Jahrbuch Fur Antike Und Mittelalter 7 (1):125-178.
  4. Benedict M. Ashley (1987). Graceful Reason: Essays in Ancient and Medieval Philosophy Presented to Joseph Owens, CSSR. Edited by Lloyd P. Gerson. Modern Schoolman 64 (2):124-125.
  5. Keith Bate (1989). William of Newburgh P. G. Walsh, M. J. Kennedy: William of Newburgh: The History of English Affairs, Book I (Edited with Translation and Commentary). (Medieval Latin Texts.) Pp. Ix + 198. Warminster: Aris & Phillips, 1988. £18.75 (Paper, £8.25). [REVIEW] The Classical Review 39 (02):366-367.
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  6. M. Anthony Brown (1959). John of Salisbury. Franciscan Studies 19 (3-4):241-297.
  7. Marcos Roberto Nunes Costa (2012). Women Intellectuals in the Middle Ages: Hildegard of Bingen - Between Medicine, Philosophy and Mysticism. Trans/Form/Ação 35 (SPE):187-208.
    É corrente se afirmar que antes da Modernidade não há registro de mulheres na construção do pensamento erudito. Que, se tomarmos, po exemplo, a Filosofia e a Teologia, que foram as duas áreas do conhecimento que mais produziram intelectuais, durante a Idade Média, não encontraremos aí a presença de mulheres. Entretanto, apesar de todas as evidências, se vasculharmos a construção do Pensamento Ocidental, veremos que é possível identificar a presença de algumas mulheres já nos tempos remotos, na Antiguidade Clássica e (...)
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  8. William J. Courtenay (1992). Peter of Capua as a Nominalist. Vivarium 30 (1):157-172.
  9. Peter Damian, Selections From His Letter on Divine Omnipotence.
    Translated from the edition in Pierre Damien: Lettre sur la toute-puissance divine. Introduction, texte critique, traduction et notes, André Cantin, ed. & tr., (“Sources Chrétiennes,” vol. 191; Paris: Les Editions du Cerf, 1972.
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  10. L. M. De Rijk (1988). Semantics and Metaphysics in Gilbert of Poitiers. Vivarium 26 (2):73-112.
    Each inhabitant of our world Gilbert calls (following Boethius) an id quod est or subsistens. Its main constituents are the subsistentiae (or the subsistent's id quo which is sometimes taken collectively to stand for ea quibus) and these are accompanied by the 'accidents', quantity and quality. The subsistent owes its status (or transitory condition) to a collection of inferior members of the Aristotelian class of accidents, which to Gilbert's mind are rather 'accessories' or 'attachments from without' (extrinsecus affixa). (...)
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  11. L. M. De Rijk (1967). Some Notes on the Twelfth Century Topic of the Three (Four) Human Evils and of Science, Virtue, and Techniques as Their Remedies. Vivarium 5 (1):8-15.
  12. L. M. De Rijk (1966). Some New Evidence on Twelfth Century Logic. Vivarium 4 (1):1-57.
    IT is well known that the art of logic (logica or diale(c)tica) knew a remarkable flourishing period during the twelfth century. In the first half of the century its main centres in Paris were: the School of Notre DameI, of St. Victor2, of the Petit Pont3 and of Mont Ste Geneviève4. The present paper aims to offer some new evidence from the manuscripts on the teaching of logic as given in the School of Mont Ste.
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  13. L. M. De Rijk (1966). Some Notes on the Mediaeval Tract de Insolubilibus, with the Edition of a Tract Dating From the End of the Twelfth Century. Vivarium 4 (1):83-115.
  14. Adinel‑Ciprian Dincă & Alexander Baumgarten (2011). Hic liber est incorrectissime impressus. A preliminary discussion of the Liber de Causis in mediaeval Transylvania. Chôra 9:491-498.
    L’article pose pour la première fois la question de la réception d’un texte essentiel pour l’histoire de la pensée européenne, le Liber de causis, en Transylvanie, aux confins de l’aire culturelle latine. Cette première tentative d’exploration se penche plus précisément sur un commentaire bien connu, appartenant à Thomas d’Aquin. Le commentaire, transmis sous une forme imprimée datant du 24 mai 1493, fait partie d’un volume composite qui se trouvait, aux alentours de 1500, dans la bibliothèque des frères dominicains de Sibiu/Hermannstadt (...)
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  15. Eva-Maria Engelen (1993). Zeit, Zahl und Bild. Studien zur Verbindung von Philosophie und Wissenschaft bei Abbo von Fleury. de Gruyter.
  16. Gillian R. Evans (1982). A Work of 'Terminist Theology'? Peter the Chanter's de Tropis Loquendi and Some Fallacie. Vivarium 20 (1):40-58.
  17. Brooke Heidenreich Findley (2006). Does the Habit Make the Nun? A Case Study of Heloise's Influence on Abelard's Ethical Philosophy. Vivarium 44 (s 2-3):248-275.
    A careful reading of Heloise's letters reveals both her contribution to Abelard's ethical thought and the differences between her ethical concerns and his. In her letters, Heloise focuses on the innate moral qualities of the inner person or animus. Hypocrisy—the misrepresentation of the inner person through false outer appearance, exemplified by the potentially deceitful religious habit or habitus—is a matter of great moral concern to her. When Abelard responds to Heloise's ideas, first in his letters to her and later in (...)
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  18. Jerold C. Frakes (1984). The Ancient Concept of Casus and its Early Medieval Interpretations. Vivarium 22 (1):1-34.
  19. Richard Gaskin (1997). Peter Damian on Divine Power and the Contingency of the Past. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 5 (2):229 – 247.
  20. Roberto Giacone (1974). Masters, Books and Library at Chartres According to the Cartularies of Notre-Dame and Saint-Père. Vivarium 12 (1):30-51.
  21. Toivo J. Holopainen (2007). Anselm's Argumentum and the Early Medieval Theory of Argument. Vivarium 45 (1):1-29.
    The article aims at elucidating the argumentation in Anselm's Proslogion by relating some aspects of it to the early medieval theory of argument. The focus of the analysis is on the "single argument" (unum argumentum), the discovery of which Anselm announces in the Preface to the Proslogion. Part 1 of the article offers a preliminary description of the single argument by describing the reductio ad absurdum technique based on the notion "that than which a greater cannot be thought". Part 2 (...)
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  22. Ludger Honnefelder (1999). Reconsidering the Tradition of Metaphysics. The Proceedings of the Twentieth World Congress of Philosophy 1999:1-13.
    In what follows, I argue that the thinkers of the twelfth to thirteenth century rediscovered and passed on the questions of metaphysics; in what I call the second beginning of metaphysics they also developed those questions in such a way that they could be received into the thinking of the modern era in the first place. It was precisely the theological context which forced this development and lead the theologians of the Latin West, inspired by their Arabic predecessors, to redesign (...)
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  23. Jasper Hopkins, Anselm's Debate with Gaunilo.
    Gaunilo, monk of Marmoutier, is known almost exclusively for his attempted refutation of Anselm’s ontological argument around 1079. Indeed, both his counter-example about the alleged island which is more excellent than all others and Anselm’s rebuttal thereof have nowadays become standard items for courses in medieval philosophy. Over the past decade or so, which has witnessed a revival of interest in the ontological argument, Gaunilo has been either lauded for his brilliancy or disparaged for his mediocrity. Thus, R. W. Southern (...)
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  24. Andrey Ivanov (2012). St. Bernard: Apology and Architectural Art. Trans/Form/Ação 35 (SPE):179-186.
    Este artigo busca expor as críticas de Bernardo de Claraval às superfluidades humanas no texto da Apologia, especialmente aquelas referentes à arte arquitetural. Em segundo lugar, procura analisar as implicações estéticas do ascetismo cisterciense e bernardiano. As críticas de Bernardo exercem uma influência decisiva na ornamentação e fazem nascer uma nova arquitetura. This paper is to expose the criticism of human superfluities at Bernard of Clairvaux in the text of the Apology, especially those related to architectural art. Secondly, analyzes the (...)
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  25. Edouard Jeauneau (1967). "Nani Gigantum Humeris Insidentes" Essai d'Interprétation de Bernard de Chartres. Vivarium 5 (1):79-99.
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  26. C. H. Kneepkens (1992). Nominalism and Grammatical Theory in the Late Eleventh and Early Twelfth Centuries an Explorative Study. Vivarium 30 (1):34-50.
  27. C. H. Kneepkens (1987). Ab Omni Homine Habetur Aliquod Capud: A Note on the Concept of Word-Order in 12th-Century Grammatical Thought. Vivarium 25 (2):146-152.
  28. C. H. Kneepkens (1977). The Relatio Simplex in the Grammatical Tracts of the Late Twelfth and Early Thirteenth Century. Vivarium 15 (1):1-30.
  29. Taneli Kukkonen (2008). No Man is an Island: Nature and Neo-Platonic Ethics in Ḥayy Ibn Yaqẓān. Journal of the History of Philosophy 46 (2):pp. 187-204.
    Ibn Ṭufayl’s story of the solitary philosopher Ḥayy who, aided only by the power of his natural reason, comes to his own on an uninhabited equatorial island, attractively portrays the neo-Platonic worldview of the Muslim falāsifah . At the same time it forces to the foreground the most trenchant problem in any intellectualist ethics. If the highest virtue consists in the unmixed contemplative life, what good can a thinker do any longer, in any more mundane context? In this article, a (...)
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  30. Paul G. Kuntz (1970). The God We Find: The God of Abraham, The God of Anselm, and the God of Weiss. Modern Schoolman 47 (4):433-453.
  31. Stipe Kutlesa (2004). Croatian Philosophers I: Hermann of Dalmatia (1110–1154). Prolegomena 3 (1):57-71.
    The article includes a short biography of Hermann of Dalmatia and gives an account of his translations and philosophical and scientific work. In order to have a better understanding of Hermann’s philosophy, a reminder of Greek and Arabic philosophy of nature, on which he relies in his interpretation of the world picture, needs to be presented. Cosmological models by Plato, Aristotle, Eudoxus, Heraclides of Pont, Apollonius of Perga, Hipparchus, Ptolemy, and the Arab scientist Abu Ma’shar, are presented. The main focus (...)
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  32. Seth Lerer (1982). John of Salisbury's Virgil. Vivarium 20 (1):24-39.
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  33. Matthias Lutz-Bachmann, Alexander Fidora & Andreas Niederberger (eds.) (2004). Metaphysics in the Twelfth Century: On the Relationship Among Philosophy, Science, and Theology. Brepols.
    Although metaphysics as a discipline can hardly be separated from Aristotle and his works, the questions it raises were certainly known to authors even before the reception of Aristotle in the thirteenth century. Even without the explicit use of this term the twelfth century manifested a strong interest in metaphysical questions under the guise of «natural philosophy» or «divine science», leading M.-D. Chenu to coin the expression of a twelfth century «éveil métaphysique». In their commentaries on Boethius and under the (...)
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  34. Scott MacDonald (1999). Gilbert of Poitiers' Metaphysics of Goodness. Recherches de Theologie Et Philosophie Medievales:57-77.
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  35. John Malcolm (1971). On Grabmann's Text of William of Sherwood. Vivarium 9 (1):108-111.
  36. John Marenbon (1992). Vocalism, Nominalism and the Commentaries on the Categories From the Earlier Twelfth Century. Vivarium 30 (1):51-61.
  37. Christopher J. Martin (2010). They Had Added Not a Single Tiny Proposition: The Reception of the Prior Analytics in the First Half of the Twelfth Century. Vivarium 48 (1-2):159-192.
    A study of the reception of Aristotle's Prior Analytics in the first half of the twelfth century. It is shown that Peter Abaelard was perhaps acquainted with as much as the first seven chapters of Book I of the Prior Analytics but with no more. The appearance at the beginning of the twelfth century of a short list of dialectical loci which has puzzled earlier commentators is explained by noting that this list formalises the classification of extensional relations between general (...)
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  38. Christopher J. Martin (1998). The Logic of Growth: Twelfth-Century Nominalists and the Development of Theories of the Incarnation. Medieval Philosophy and Theology 7 (01):1-15.
    Among the various testimonia assembled by Iwakuma and Ebbesen to the twelfth-century school of philosophers known as the Nominales, 1 four record their commitment to the apparently outrageous thesis that nothing grows. My aim in this essay is to explore the reasons the Nominales had for maintaining this thesis and to investigate the role that the theory which supported it played in the development of late twelfth- and early thirteenth-century debates over the character of the hypostatic union. My investigation concerns (...)
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  39. Christopher J. Martin (1992). The Logic of the Nominales, or, the Rise and Fall of Impossible Positio. Vivarium 30 (1):110-126.
  40. Jacques Monfrin (1970). Le Latin Médiéval Et la Langue Des Chartes. Vivarium 8 (1):81-98.
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  41. John A. Mourant (1958). History of Christian Philosophy in the Middle Ages (Review). Franciscan Studies 18 (1):96-97.
  42. Cary J. Nederman (1986). The Aristotelian Doctrine of the Mean and John of Salisbury's Concept of Liberty. Vivarium 24 (2):128-142.
  43. John Newell (1983). Rationalism at the School of Chartres. Vivarium 21 (2):108-126.
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  44. F. J. E. Raby (1956). John of Salisbury W. J. Millor and H. E. Butler: The Letters of John of Salisbury. Vol. I. The Early Letters (1153–1161). Pp. Lxviii+296. Edinburgh: Nelson, 1955. Cloth, 50s. Net. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 6 (3-4):295-296.
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  45. Irven M. Resnick (1991). Odo of Toumai's De Peccato Originali and the Problem of Original Sin. Medieval Philosophy and Theology 1:18-38.
  46. Roger E. Reynolds (1969). Further Evidence for the Irish Origin of Honorius Augustodunensis. Vivarium 7 (1):1-8.
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  47. Lee C. Rice (1973). "Commentaries on Boethius by Thierry of Chartres and His School," Ed. Nikolaus M. Häring, S.A.C. Modern Schoolman 50 (2):234-234.
  48. Philipp W. Rosemann (2004). Peter Lombard. OUP USA.
    Peter Lombard is best known as the author of a celebrated work entitled Book of Sentences, which for several centuries served as the standard theological textbook in the Christian West. It was the subject of more commentaries than any other work of Christian literature besides the Bible itself. The Book of Sentences is essentially a compilation of older sources, from the Scriptures and Augustine down to several of the Lombard's contemporaries, such as Hugh of Saint Victor and Peter Abelard. Its (...)
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  49. Irène Rosier & Bruno Roy (1990). Grammaire Et Liturgie Dans Les "Sophismes" du XIIe Siècle. Vivarium 28 (2):118-135.
  50. Noeli Dutra Rossatto (2012). Medieval Hermeneutics: The Spiritual Comprehension of Joachim of Fiore. Trans/Form/Ação 35 (SPE):99-118.
    O estudo trata a hermenêutica medieval sob o prisma da compreensão espiritual (intelectio spiritualis) de Joaquim de Fiore (1135-1202). Mostra que a noção de Trindade serve de base para retomar o método alegórico e o tipológico da tradição. Além disso, serve para propor o novo método por concórdia que, a nosso ver, culminará na maior inovação da leitura da história medieval. Entre os resultados, destacamos a continuidade imediata dessa hermenêutica com os franciscanos espirituais do século XIII e sua influência direta (...)
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