This category needs an editor. We encourage you to help if you are qualified.
Volunteer, or read more about what this involves.
Related categories
Siblings:
268 found
Search inside:
(import / add options)   Sort by:
1 — 50 / 268
  1. Felice Accrocca & Robert M. Stewart (1994). Concerning the Case of the Heretical Pope: John XXII and the Question of Poverty: Ms. XXI of the Capestrano Convent. Franciscan Studies 54 (1):167-184.
  2. Marilyn McCord Adams (2008). The Metaphysics of the Trinity in Some Fourteenth Century Franciscans. Franciscan Studies 66 (1):101 - 168.
  3. Marilyn McCord Adams & O. F. M. Wolter (1993). Memory and Intuition: A Focal Debate in Fourteenth Century Cognitive Psychology. Franciscan Studies 53 (1):175-192.
  4. Marilyn McCord Adams & Rega Wood (1981). Is To Will It as Bad as To Do It?: The Fourteenth Century Debate. Franciscan Studies 41 (1):5-60.
  5. Han Thomas Adriaenssen (2011). Peter John Olivi on Perceptual Representation. Vivarium 49 (4):324-352.
    Abstract This paper studies Olivi's account of perceptual representation. It addresses two main questions: (1) how do perceptual representations originate? and (2) how do they represent their objects? Regarding (1), it is well known that Olivi emphasizes the activity of the soul in the production of perceptual representations. Yet it is sometimes argued that he overstresses the activity of the soul in a way that yields a philosophically problematic result. I argue that Olivi was well aware of the problem that (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Erik Åkerlund (2009). Suárez on Forms, Universals and Understanding. Studia Neoaristotelica 6 (2):159-182.
    Suarezii de formis, universalibus, notitia intellectiva sententiaSententia Suarezii circa quaestionem famosam de statu universalium variissimis modis ab diversis interpretibus exponi solet. In disertatio quidem proposita res paulo aliter pertractatur, a Suarezii metaphysica doctrina de formis substantialibus et de cognitione intellectiva ac sctientia exeundo. Quae Suarezii doctrinae diligenti analysi subiciuntur earumque conexio consideratur. Respectu quaestione supradicta, scil. quaenam fuit vera Suarezii de statu universalium sententia, arguitur, Suarezium nominalismum moderatum professum esse, quae conclusio suadetur ex doctrinis suis de formis substantialibus et de (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Jason Aleksander (2011). Dante's Understanding of the Two Ends of Human Desire and the Relationship Between Philosophy and Theology. Journal of Religion 91 (2):158-187.
    I discuss Dante’s understanding that human existence is “ordered by two final goals” and how this understanding defines philosophy’s and theology’s respective scopes of authority in guiding human conduct. I show that, while Dante devalues the philosophical authority associated with the traditional Aristotelian emphasis on the significance of contemplative activity, he does so in order to highlight philosophy’s ethico-political authority to guide human conduct toward its “earthly beatitude.” Moreover, I argue that, although Dante subordinates earthly beatitude to spiritual beatitude, he (...)
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Jason Aleksander (2010). The Aporetic Ground of Revelation’s Authority in the Divine Comedy and Dante’s Demarcation and Defense of Philosophical Authority. Essays in Medieval Studies 26:1-14.
    I discuss Dante’s understanding that human existence is “ordered by two final goals” and how, for Dante, this understanding defines philosophy’s and revelation’s respective scopes of authority in guiding human conduct. Specifically, I show that, although Dante subordinates our earthly beatitude to spiritual beatitude in a way that seems to suggest the subordination of the authority of philosophy to that of revelation, he in fact limits philosophy’s scope to an arena in which its authority is not only legitimate but also (...)
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Maria Cambray I. Amenós (2013). Las Enfermedades de San Francisco de Asís. Franciscan Studies 70 (1):1-37.
    Primero de todo y antes de abordar el tema para someterlo a vuestra consideración tendría que pedir disculpas. Disculpas porque todo lo que voy a exponer no puede ser sino una aproximación de lo que pudo haber sucedido y lo es por varias razones. Primera, porque actualmente los médicos no nos atrevemos a dar ningún diagnóstico sin que exista el aval de una prueba radiológica o de laboratorio que, de manera concluyente, demuestre el origen del proceso patológico. Por ejemplo, en (...)
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. David Amico (1988). Bernard of Besse: Praises of Blessed Francis (Liber de laudibus Beati Francisci). Franciscan Studies 48 (1):213-268.
  11. Asadeh M. Ansari (2012). Theo Kobusch, Die Philosophie des Hoch- und Spatmittelalters. Bochumer Philosophisches Jahrbuch Fur Antike Und Mittelalter 15 (1):293-297.
  12. Benedict M. Ashley (1996). Albertus Magnus on Aristotle's Metaphysics, Bk. I, Tr. 1. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 70 (1):137-155.
  13. Benedict M. Ashley (1987). Graceful Reason: Essays in Ancient and Medieval Philosophy Presented to Joseph Owens, CSSR. Edited by Lloyd P. Gerson. Modern Schoolman 64 (2):124-125.
  14. Christoph Asmuth (1999). Norbert Winkler, Meister Eckhart zur Einführung. Bochumer Philosophisches Jahrbuch Fur Antike Und Mittelalter 4 (1):263-267.
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Piotr Augustyniak (2011). Bóg Mistrza Eckharta wobec Nietzscheańskiej krytyki chrześcijaństwa. ARGUMENT 1 (2):211-224.
    English title: Master Eckhart’s God Confronted with Nietzschean Critique of Christianity. Author tries to demonstrate that the way of thinking about Christian God developed in the late Middle Ages by Master Eckhart goes beyond the interpretation which underlies Nietzsche’s criticism of Christianity as a religion of the other world. In the paper, Author first presents the said criticism, followed by the vision of God outlined by Eckhart. He demonstrates that Christianity, criticized by Nietzsche, uses a commonsense vision of God’s transcendence (...)
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Walter Bado (1964). In Honor of Nicholas of Cusa. Modern Schoolman 42 (1):1-2.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Paul J. J. M. Bakker (2012). Nicholas of Amsterdam on Accidental Being: A Study and Edition of Two Questions From His Commentary on the Metaphysics. Bochumer Philosophisches Jahrbuch Fur Antike Und Mittelalter 15 (1):131-180.
  18. Steven Baldner (1997). St. Bonaventure and the Demonstrability of a Temporal Beginning. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 71 (2):225-236.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Steven Baldner (1989). St. Bonaventure on the Temporal Beginning of the World. New Scholasticism 63 (2):206-228.
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Timothy F. Bellamah (2011). The Biblical Interpretation of William of Alton. OUP USA.
    Studies of medieval Biblical interpretation usually focus on the printed literature, neglecting the vast majority of relevant works. Timothy Bellamah offers a groundbreaking examination of the exegesis of William of Alton, a thirteenth-century Dominican regent master at Paris whose commentaries have never previously appeared in print. As a near contemporary of Hugh of St. Cher, Bonaventure, Albert the Great, and Thomas Aquinas, William was an important representative of university exegesis at a time of rapidly changing methods and remarkable intellectual development. (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Klaus Biewer & Alain Touwaide (1995). Albertus Magnus' De Vegetabilibus'. History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 17 (3):503.
  22. David Bloch (2010). Videnssamfundet I Det 12. Og 13. Århundrede: Forskning Og Formidling. Det Kongelige Danske Videnskabernes Selskab.
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. David Bloch (2009). Robert Grosseteste's Conclusiones_ and the Commentary on the _Posterior Analytics. Vivarium 47 (1):1-23.
  24. Morton W. Bloomfield (1957). Some Reflections on the Medieval Idea of Perfection. Franciscan Studies 17 (2-3):213-237.
  25. James M. Blythe (2002). Aristotle's Politics and Ptolemy of Lucca. Vivarium 40 (1):103-136.
  26. Philotheus Boehner (1953). Walram von Siegburg O. F. M. und seine Doktorpromotion an der Kölner Universität (1430-1435) (review). Franciscan Studies 13 (4):137-138.
  27. Philotheus Boehner (1947). Bibliography of English Translations From Medieval Sources (Review). Franciscan Studies 7 (1):99-100.
  28. Philotheus Boehner (1947). Obras de San Buenaventura (Review). Franciscan Studies 7 (4):513-514.
  29. Charles Bolyard (2000). Knowing Naturaliter: Auriol's Propositional Foundations. Vivarium 38 (1):162-176.
  30. Bonaventure, Writings of St. Bonaventure.
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. Bonaventure (1937). The Franciscan Vision: Translation of St. Bonaventure's Itinerarium Mentis in Deum. Burns, Oates and Washbourne.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. E. P. Bos (1979). A Note on an Unknown Manuscript Bearing Upon Marsilius of Inghen's Philosophy of Nature. Vivarium 17 (1):61-68.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. E. P. Bos (1977). An Unedited Sophism by Marsilius of Inghen : 'Homo Est Bos'. Vivarium 15 (1):46-56.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. Vernon J. Bourke (1990). The Trinity, or the First Principle. By William of Auvergne. Modern Schoolman 67 (4):305-306.
  35. Ignatius Brady (1974). St. Bonaventure's Doctrine of Illumination. Southwestern Journal of Philosophy 5 (2):27-37.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. Ignatius Brady (1970). Background to the Condemnation of 1270: Master William of Baglione, O. F. M. Franciscan Studies 30 (1):5-48.
  37. C. K. Brampton (1963). "Gregory of Rimini: Tradition and Innovation in the Fourteenth Century," by Gordon Leff. Modern Schoolman 41 (1):78-80.
  38. Jean-Baptiste Brenet (2008). Ame Intellective, Âme Cogitative: Jean de Jandun Et la Duplex Forma Propria de L'Homme. Vivarium 46 (3):318-341.
    The article analyses the idea that according to the averroist Jean de Jandun, Master of Arts in Paris at the beginning of the 14th century, human beings are composed of a «double form» the separated intellect on the one hand, the cogitative soul on the other hand. After recalling several major accounts of the time, we explore Jean's reading of Averroes' major conceptions concerning the problem. Finally, we challenge the idea according to which we observe in his writings the radical (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. Elizabeth Brient (1999). Transitions to a Modern Cosmology: Meister Eckhart and Nicholas of Cusa on the Intensive Infinite. Journal of the History of Philosophy 37 (4):575-600.
  40. Jeffrey Brower (2001). Relations Without Polyadic Properties: Albert the Great on the Nature and Ontological Status of Relations. Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 83 (3):225-257.
    I think it would be fair to say that, until about 1900, philosophers were generally reluctant to admit the existence of what are nowadays called polyadic properties (for our purposes we may think of a polyadic property as a property whose instances can belong to two or more subjects at once).1 It is important to recognize, however, that this reluctance on the part of pre-twentieth-century philosophers did not prevent them from theorizing about relations. On the contrary, philosophers from the ancient (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. Susan Brower-Toland, Can God Know More? A Case Study in the Later Medieval Debate About Propositions.
    This paper traces a rather peculiar debate between William Ockham, Walter Chatton, and Robert Holcot over whether it is possible for God to know more than he knows. Although the debate specifically addresses a theological question about divine knowledge, the central issue at stake in it is a purely philosophical question about the nature and ontological status of propositions. The theories of propositions that emerge from the discussion appear deeply puzzling, however. My aim in this paper is to show that (...)
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. Susan Brower-Toland (forthcoming). How Chatton Changed Ockham's Mind: William Ockham and Walter Chatton on Objects and Acts of Judgment. In G. Klima (ed.), Intentionality, Cognition and Mental Representation in Medieval Philosophy. Fordham University Press.
    It is well-known that Chatton is among the earliest and most vehement critics of Ockham’s theory of judgment, but scholars have overlooked the role Chatton’s criticisms play in shaping Ockham’s final account. In this paper, I demonstrate that Ockham’s most mature treatment of judgment not only contains revisions that resolve the problems Chatton identifies in his earlier theories, but also that these revisions ultimately bring his final account of the objects of judgment surprisingly close to Chatton’s own. Even so, I (...)
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. Susan Brower-Toland, Walter Chatton. Encyclopedia of Medieval Philosophy.
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. Susan Brower-Toland (2006). Facts Vs. Things: Adam Wodeham and the Later Medieval Debate About Objects of Judgment. Review of Metaphysics 60 (3):597-642.
    Commentators have long agreed that Wodeham’s account of objects of judgment is highly innovative, but they have continued to disagree about its proper interpretation. Some read him as introducing items that are merely supervenient on (and nothing in addition to) Aristotelian substances and accidents; others take him to be introducing a new type of entity in addition to substances and accidents—namely, abstract states of affairs. In this paper, I argue that both interpretations are mistaken: the entities Wodeham introduces are really (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. Susan Brower-Toland (2005). Special Editor's Introduction to Medieval Metaphysics. Modern Schoolman 82 (2):81-82.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. Susan Brower-Toland (2002). Instantaneous Change and the Physics of Sanctification: &Quot;quasi-Aristotelianism" in Henry of Ghent's. Journal of the History of Philosophy 40 (1).
    In Quodlibet XV q.13, Henry of Ghent considers whether the Virgin Mary was immaculately conceived. He argues that she was not, but rather possessed sin only at the first instant of her existence. Because Henry’s defense of this position involves an elaborate discussion of motion and mutation, his discussion marks an important contribution to medieval discussions of Aristotelian natural philosophy. In fact, a number of scholars have identified Henry’s discussion as the source of an unusual fourteenth-century theory of change referred (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. J. V. Brown (1973). Abstraction and the Object of the Human Intellect According to Henry of Ghent. Vivarium 11 (1):80-104.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. M. Anthony Brown (1956). William Heytesbury, Medieval Logic and the Rise of Mathematical Physics (Review). Franciscan Studies 16 (4):410-411.
  49. Mary Anthony Brown (1966). The Role of the Tractatus de Obligationibus in Mediaeval Logic. Franciscan Studies 26 (1):26-35.
  50. Stephen F. Brown (1994). Peter of Candia on Believing and Knowing. Franciscan Studies 54 (1):251-261.
1 — 50 / 268