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  1. Fred Ablondi (2008). François Lamy, Occasionalism, and the Mind-Body Problem. Journal of the History of Philosophy 46 (4):pp. 619-629.
    There is a long-standing view that Malebranche and his fellow occasionalists accepted occasionalism to solve the problem of interaction between immaterial souls and extended bodies. Recently, however, scholars have shown this story to be a myth. Malebranche, Geulincx, La Forge, and Cordemoy adopted occasionalism for a variety of reasons, but none did so because of a need to provide a solution to a perceived mind-body problem. Yet there is one Cartesian for whom the “traditional” reading is largely on the mark. (...)
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  2. Ian W. Alexander (1962). French Free-Thought From Gassendi to Voltaire. By J. S. Spink. (University of London, The Athlone Press, 1960. Pp. Ix + 345. Price 50s.). [REVIEW] Philosophy 37 (142):369-.
  3. Vlad Alexandrescu (2013). Regius and Gassendi on the Human Soul. Intellectual History Review 23 (2):433-452.
    Reshaping the neo-Aristotelian doctrines about the human soul was Descartes’s most spectacular enterprise, which gave birth to some of the sharpest debates in the Republic of Letters. Neverthe- less, it was certainly Descartes’s intention, as already expressed in the Discours de la méthode, to show that his new metaphysics could be supplemented with experimental research in the field of medicine and the conservation of life. It is no surprise then that several natural philosophers and doctors, such as Henricus Regius from (...)
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  4. Wilda Anderson (1985). Rhetoric and Nomenclature in Lavoisier's Chemical Language. Topoi 4 (2):165-169.
    Implicit in the theoretical chemical writings of Antoine Laurent Lavoisier is a theory of language that is not in complete harmony with the philosopher of language whom he takes as his explicit authority, Condillac. Lavoisier's reform of the nomenclature of chemistry leads to his dividing scientific language into two sets with different properties: a denotative artificial nomenclature and connotative natural language. This division supposedly permits knowledge to be stored in the nomenclature while the natural language retains the rhetorical tools necessary (...)
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  5. Noga Arikha (2005). Deafness, Ideas and the Language of Thought in the Late 1600s. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 13 (2):233 – 262.
  6. Sylvain Auroux (1985). The Analytic and the Synthetic as Linguistic Topics. Topoi 4 (2):193-199.
    The Analytic/Synthetic distinction did not originate in Kant, but in Port-Royal's logical theory. The key for the doctrine is the explicite recognition of two different kinds of relative clauses, e.g. explicative and determinative. In the middle eighteenth century the distinction becomes a topic within the grammars. Although we can find by grammarians different criteria for the distinction, these criteria (for which we can find medieval sources) are for the main predictable from the original theory of ideas, which was presented in (...)
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  7. Bernard Baertschi (1991). L'athéisme de Diderot. Revue Philosophique De Louvain 89 (3):421-449.
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  8. Gary Banham (2011). The Antimonies of Pure Practical Libertine Reason. Angelaki 15 (1):13-27.
    In this article I revisit the relationship between Immanuel Kant and the Marquis De Sade, following not Jacques Lacan but Pierre Klossowski. In the process I suggest that Sade's work is marred by a series of antinomies that prevent him from stating a pure practical libertine reason and leave his view purely theoretical.
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  9. C. J. Betts (1984). Early Deism in France: From the so-Called "Déistes" of Lyon (1564) to Voltaire's "Lettres Philosophiques" (1734). Kluwer Academic Publishers.
    ... 'DEISTES' AT LYON, AND TWO CHARACTERS IN BODIN Deism, the religious attitude typical of the Enlightenment in France, England and elsewhere, ...
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  10. Hilary Bok, Baron de Montesquieu, Charles-Louis de Secondat. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    Montesquieu was one of the great political philosophers of the Enlightenment. Insatiably curious and mordantly funny, he constructed a naturalistic account of the various forms of government, and of the causes that made them what they were and that advanced or constrained their development. He used this account to explain how governments might be preserved from corruption. He saw despotism, in particular, as a standing danger for any government not already despotic, and argued that it could best be prevented by (...)
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  11. Jacqueline Broad (2002). Women Philosophers of the Seventeenth Century. Cambridge University Press.
    In this rich and detailed study of early modern women's thought, Jacqueline Broad explores the complexity of women's responses to Cartesian philosophy and its intellectual legacy in England and Europe. She examines the work of thinkers such as Mary Astell, Elisabeth of Bohemia, Margaret Cavendish, Anne Conway and Damaris Masham, who were active participants in the intellectual life of their time and were also the respected colleagues of philosophers such as Descartes, Leibniz and Locke. She also illuminates the continuities between (...)
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  12. Genevi?Ve Brykman (1987). Bayle's Case for Spinoza. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 88:259 - 270.
  13. Edwin A. Burtt (1954/2003). The Metaphysical Foundations of Modern Science. Dover Publications.
    To the medieval thinker, man was the center of creation and all of nature existed purely for his benefit. The shift from the philosophy of the Middle Ages to the modern view of humanity's less central place in the universe ranks as the greatest revolution in the history of Western thought, and this classic in the philosophy of science describes and analyzes how the profound change occurred. A fascinating analysis of the works of Copernicus, Kepler, Galileo, Descartes, Hobbes, Gilbert, Boyle, (...)
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  14. Daniel Carey & Lynn Festa (eds.) (2009). The Postcolonial Enlightenment: Eighteenth-Century Colonialism and Postcolonial Theory. OUP Oxford.
    Over the last thirty years, postcolonial critiques of European imperial practices have transformed our understanding of colonial ideology, resistance, and cultural contact. The Enlightenment has played a complex but often unacknowledged role in this discussion, alternately reviled and venerated as the harbinger of colonial dominion and avatar of liberation, as target and shield, as shadow and light. This volume brings together two arenas - eighteenth-century studies and postcolonial theory - in order to interrogate the role and reputation of Enlightenment in (...)
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  15. Desmond Clarke (forthcoming). François Poulain de la Barre. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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  16. Desmond M. Clarke (1989). Occult Powers and Hypotheses: Cartesian Natural Philosophy Under Louis Xiv. Oxford University Press.
    This book analyses the concept of scientific explanation developed by French disciples of Descartes in the period 1660-1700. Clarke examines the views of authors such as Malebranche and Rohault, as well as those of less well-known authors such as Cordemoy, Gadroys, Poisson and R'egis. These Cartesian natural philosophers developed an understanding of scientific explanation as necessarily hypothetical, and, while they contributed little to new scientific discoveries, they made a lasting contribution to our concept of explanation--generations of scientists in subsequent centuries (...)
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  17. John J. Conley (2009). Adoration and Annihilation: The Convent Philosophy of Port-Royal. University of Notre Dame Press.
    A convent philosophy -- Mère Angélique Arnauld : virtue and grace -- Mère Agnès Arnauld : adoration and right -- Mère Angélique de Saint-Jean Arnauld d'Andilly : persecution and resistance -- A nocturnal philosophy.
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  18. Monte Cook (2008). Desgabets as a Cartesian Empiricist. Journal of the History of Philosophy 46 (4):pp. 501-515.
    A long tradition regards Robert Desgabets as a Cartesian empiricist. He says things that sound strikingly like Locke, and he argues against anti-empiricist reasoning in Descartes, Malebranche, and Arnauld. Moreover, throughout his writings he endorses the empiricist principle that nothing is in the intellect except what was previously in the senses. Since the Cartesians are generally supposed to be prototypical non -empiricists, Desgabets’s being a Cartesian empiricist would make him a particularly interesting specimen. In this paper, however, I challenge the (...)
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  19. Monte Cook (2005). Desgabets on the Creation of Eternal Truths. Journal of the History of Philosophy 43 (1):21-36.
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  20. Monte Cook (2002). Robert Desgabets's Representation Principle. Journal of the History of Philosophy 40 (2):189-200.
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  21. Monte Cook (1974). Arnauld's Alleged Representationalism. Journal of the History of Philosophy 12 (1):53-62.
  22. Richard J. Cummins (1991). Arnauld and the Cartesian Philosophy of Ideas. International Philosophical Quarterly 31 (4):505-506.
  23. Peter Dear (1987). Jesuit Mathematical Science and the Reconstitution of Experience in the Early Seventeenth Century. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 18 (2):133-175.
  24. des Chene, Suárez on Propinquity and the Efficient Cause.
    In the Principles, Descartes declares that of the four Aristotelian causes, he will retain only one: the efficient. Though some natural philosophers argued on behalf of the final cause, and others held that form could be rehabilitated, the efficient cause was in fact the only one of the four to flourish in the new philosophy. Descartes’ claim would lead one to believe that he preserved the efficient cause—that here, at least, we find continuity. But it is reasonable to wonder whether, (...)
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  25. Dennis des Chene, Natural Laws and Divine Agency in the Later Seventeenth Century.
    It is a commonplace that one of the primary tasks of natural science is to discover the laws of nature. Those who don’t think that nature has laws will of course disagree; but of those who do, most will be in accord with Armstrong when he writes that natural science, having discovered the kinds and properties of things, should “state the laws” which those things “obey” (Armstrong What is a law 3). No Scholastic philosopher would have included the discovery of (...)
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  26. Karen Detlefsen (2013). Emilie du Châtelet Between Leibniz and Newton. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 21 (1):207-209.
    British Journal for the History of Philosophy, Volume 21, Issue 1, Page 207-209, January 2013.
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  27. Thomas Docherty (1999). Criticism and Modernity: Aesthetics, Literature, and Nations in Europe and its Academies. OUP Oxford.
    Criticism and Modernity traces the conditions under which criticism emerges as a socio-cultural practice within the institutionalized forms of European modernity and democracy. It argues that criticism is born out of anxieties about national supremacy in the late seventeenth century, with the consequence that the emergent national cultures of the eighteenth century and since become sites for the regulation of the democratic subject through the academic form of arguments about the proper relations of aesthetics to ethics and politics. The central (...)
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  28. Lisa Downing (2012). Maupertuis on Attraction as an Inherent Property of Matter. In Janiak Schliesser (ed.), Interpreting Newton.
    Pierre Louis Moreau de Maupertuis’ famous and influential Discours sur les différentes figures des astres, which represented the first public defense of attractionism in the Cartesian stronghold of the Paris Academy, sometimes suggests a metaphysically agnostic defense of gravity as simply a regularity. However, Maupertuis’ considered account in the essay, I argue, is much more subtle. I analyze Maupertuis’ position, showing how it is generated by an extended consideration of the possibility of attraction as an inherent property and fuelled by (...)
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  29. Lisa Downing (2004). Old History and Introductory Teaching in Early Modern Philosophy. In J. B. Schneewind (ed.), Teaching New Histories of Philosophy. 19-28.
  30. L. H. E. (1956). Leibniz in France From Arnauld to Voltaire. Review of Metaphysics 9 (4):700-700.
  31. Patricia Easton (2011). The Cartesian Doctor, François Bayle (1622–1709), on Psychosomatic Explanation. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 42 (2):203-209.
  32. Lorne Falkenstein (2005). Condillac's Paradox. Journal of the History of Philosophy 43 (4):403-435.
    : I argue that Condillac was committed to four mutually inconsistent propositions: that the mind is unextended, that sensations are modifications of the mind, that colours are sensations, and that colours are extended. I argue that this inconsistency was not just the blunder of a second-rate philosopher, but the consequence of a deep-seated tension in the views of early modern philosophers on the nature of the mind, sensation, and secondary qualities and that more widely studied figures, notably Condillac's contemporaries, Hume (...)
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  33. Madeleine Fields (1963). Voltaire and Rameau. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 21 (4):457-465.
  34. William Forgie (2007). Gassendi and Kant on Existence. Journal of the History of Philosophy 45 (4):511 - 523.
    : In rejecting Descartes's ontological proof for the existence of God, Gassendi maintained that existence is not a property and Kant said that it is not a "real predicate." It is commonly supposed that both are making the same claim. Some have even thought that they advance essentially the same argument for that same claim. I believe none of this is correct. Gassendi and Kant offer different arguments. And they are arguing for different conclusions. These differences stem from a more (...)
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  35. Daniel Garber & Steven M. Nadler (eds.) (2006). Oxford Studies in Early Modern Philosophy. Oxford University Press.
    Oxford Studies in Early Modern Philosophy focuses on the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries--the extraordinary period of intellectual flourishing that begins, very roughly, with Descartes and his contemporaries and ends with Kant. It also publishes papers on thinkers or movements outside of that framework, provided they are important in illuminating early modern thought.
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  36. Stephen Gaukroger (2012). What Does History Matter to the History of Philosophy? Journal of the Philosophy of History 5 (3):406-424.
    Abstract Contrary to most modern interpretations, in the early modern period, history was an indispensable resource for many philosophers. The different uses of history by Bacon, Gassendi, Locke, and Hume are explored to establish the role of history as a resource in early-modern philosophy.
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  37. Geoffrey Gorham (2009). God and the Natural World in the Seventeenth Century: Space, Time, and Causality. Philosophy Compass 4 (5):859-872.
    The employment by seventeenth-century natural philosophers of stock theological notions like creation, immensity, and eternity in the articulation and justification of emerging physical programs disrupted a delicate but longstanding balance between transcendent and immanent conceptions of God. By playing a prominent (if not always leading) role in many of the major scientific developments of the period, God became more intimately involved with natural processes than at any time since antiquity. In this discussion, I am particularly concerned with the causal and (...)
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  38. Felicia Gottmann (2012). Du Châtelet, Voltaire, and the Transformation of Mandeville's Fable. History of European Ideas 38 (2):218-232.
    Summary In about 1735, Emilie Du Châtelet began to translate Mandeville's Fable of the Bees. Her work, which is largely ignored by scholars, did, as this article demonstrates, turn out to be one of transformation rather than of translation and came at a crucial moment in the emerging French luxury debate. So far commercial society and luxury had been defended in purely economic terms, for instance in Melon's Essai politique, or as an aspect of divine providence for fallen man, by (...)
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  39. Keith Gunderson (1964). Descartes, La Mettrie, Language, and Machines. Philosophy 39 (149):193 - 222.
  40. Veronica Gventsadze (2007). Aristotelian Influences in Gassendi's Moral Philosophy. Journal of the History of Philosophy 45 (2):223-242.
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  41. Alan Hájek & Stephan Hartmann, Bayesian Epistemology.
    According to one view, there cannot: Bayesianism fails to do justice to essential aspects of knowledge and belief, and as such it cannot provide a genuine epistemology at all. According to another view, Bayesianism should supersede traditional epistemology: where the latter has been mired in endless debates over skepticism and Gettierology, Bayesianism offers the epistemologist a thriving research program. We will advocate a more moderate view: Bayesianism can illuminate various long­standing problems of epistemology, while not addressing all of them; and (...)
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  42. Michael W. Hickson (2013). Theodicy and Toleration in Bayle's Dictionary. Journal of the History of Philosophy 51 (1):49-73.
    Theodicy and Toleration Seem at first glance to be an unlikely pair of topics to treat in a single paper. Toleration usually means putting up with beliefs or actions with which one disagrees, and it is practiced because the beliefs or actions in question are not disagreeable enough to justify interference. It is usually taken to be a topic for moral and political philosophy. Theodicy, on the other hand, is the attempt to solve the problem of evil; that is, to (...)
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  43. Michael W. Hickson (2010). The Message of Bayle's Last Title: Providence and Toleration in the Entretiens de Maxime Et de Thémiste. Journal of the History of Ideas 71 (4):547-567.
    In this paper I uncover the identities of the interlocutors of Pierre Bayle's Entretiens de Maxime et de Themiste, and I show the significance of these identities for a proper understanding of the Entretiens and of Bayle's thought more generally. Maxime and Themiste represent the philosophers of late antiquity, Maximus of Tyre and Themistius. Bayle brought these philosophers into dialogue in order to suggest that the problem of evil, though insoluble by means of speculative reason, could be dissolved and thus (...)
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  44. Michael W. Hickson & Thomas M. Lennon (2009). The Real Significance of Bayle's Authorship of the Avis. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 17 (1):191 – 205.
    Did Bayle write the Avis aux réfugiés? Although the long debate over this question might not be over, we are convinced that strong probability supports Gianluca Mori's position that Bayle was indeed its sole author. We are also convinced, however, that the significance that Mori assigns to Bayle's authorship gets it exactly the wrong way around, for while Mori is right that the Avis is not only consistent but also representative of the views espoused by Bayle in his subsequent work (...)
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  45. Paul Hoffman (2002). Direct Realism, Intentionality, and the Objective Being of Ideas. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 83 (2):163-179.
    My aim is to arrive at a better understanding of the distinction between direct realism and representationalism by offering a critical analysis of Steven Nadler.
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  46. Thomas Anand Holden (2004). Bayle and the Case for Actual Parts. Journal of the History of Philosophy 42 (2):145-164.
    : Pierre Bayle is the most forthright and systematic early modern proponent of the actual parts doctrine, the period's counterpart to the 'doctrine of arbitrary undetached parts' familiar from current analytic mereology and metaphysics. In this paper I introduce both the actual parts account of the internal structure of matter and the rival system of potential parts. I then identify Bayle as the leading advocate of the actual parts doctrine and examine his arguments for this account.
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  47. Charlie Huenemann (2008). The Good Life in the Scientific Revolution: Descartes, Pascal, and The. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Philosophy 46 (2):321-322.
  48. Sarah Hutton (2004). Emilie du Châtelet's Institutions de Physique as a Document in the History of French Newtonianism. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 35 (3):515-531.
  49. Carolyn Iltis (1977). Madame du Châtelet's Metaphysics and Mechanics. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 8 (1):29-48.
  50. Kristen Irwin (2011). Amyraut on Reason and Religious Belief. Modern Schoolman 88 (3-4):191-200.
    Moses Amyraut’s 1640 work On the Elevation of Faith and the Humbling of Reason is often misread as advocating the position suggested by its title. In fact, Amyraut constructs a tripartite classification of religious beliefs according to their relation to reason, such that he can affirm truths that are incomprehensible to reason, while maintaining that reason is the ultimate ground of their truth. He divides religious truths into those delivered by reason, those consistent with reason, and those incomprehensible to reason, (...)
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