This category needs an editor. We encourage you to help if you are qualified.
Volunteer, or read more about what this involves.
Related categories
Siblings:
131 found
Search inside:
(import / add options)   Sort by:
1 — 50 / 131
  1. Fred Ablondi (2008). François Lamy, Occasionalism, and the Mind-Body Problem. Journal of the History of Philosophy 46 (4):pp. 619-629.
    There is a long-standing view that Malebranche and his fellow occasionalists accepted occasionalism to solve the problem of interaction between immaterial souls and extended bodies. Recently, however, scholars have shown this story to be a myth. Malebranche, Geulincx, La Forge, and Cordemoy adopted occasionalism for a variety of reasons, but none did so because of a need to provide a solution to a perceived mind-body problem. Yet there is one Cartesian for whom the “traditional” reading is largely on the mark. (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Niderst Alain (2011). KÖLVING U., COURCELLE O., Émilie du Chatelêt: Éclairages et documents nouveaux (CR du n° 2/2011). Revue d'Histoire des Sciences 2 (12):403-404.
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. I. W. Alexander (1962). SPINK, J. S.-"French Free-Thought From Gassendi to Voltaire". [REVIEW] Philosophy 37:369.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Ian W. Alexander (1962). French Free-Thought From Gassendi to Voltaire. By J. S. Spink. (University of London, The Athlone Press, 1960. Pp. Ix + 345. Price 50s.). [REVIEW] Philosophy 37 (142):369-.
  5. Vlad Alexandrescu (2013). Regius and Gassendi on the Human Soul. Intellectual History Review 23 (2):433-452.
    Reshaping the neo-Aristotelian doctrines about the human soul was Descartes’s most spectacular enterprise, which gave birth to some of the sharpest debates in the Republic of Letters. Neverthe- less, it was certainly Descartes’s intention, as already expressed in the Discours de la méthode, to show that his new metaphysics could be supplemented with experimental research in the field of medicine and the conservation of life. It is no surprise then that several natural philosophers and doctors, such as Henricus Regius from (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Wilda Anderson (1985). Rhetoric and Nomenclature in Lavoisier's Chemical Language. Topoi 4 (2):165-169.
    Implicit in the theoretical chemical writings of Antoine Laurent Lavoisier is a theory of language that is not in complete harmony with the philosopher of language whom he takes as his explicit authority, Condillac. Lavoisier's reform of the nomenclature of chemistry leads to his dividing scientific language into two sets with different properties: a denotative artificial nomenclature and connotative natural language. This division supposedly permits knowledge to be stored in the nomenclature while the natural language retains the rhetorical tools necessary (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Peter R. Anstey & Alberto Vanzo (forthcoming). Early Modern Experimental Philosophy. In Justin Sytsma & Wesley Buckwalter (eds.), A Companion to Experimental Philosophy. Blackwell.
    In the mid-seventeenth century a movement of self-styled experimental philosophers emerged in Britain. Originating in the discipline of natural philosophy amongst Fellows of the fledgling Royal Society of London, it soon spread to medicine and by the eighteenth century had impacted moral and political philosophy and even aesthetics. Early modern experimental philosophers gave epistemic priority to observation and experiment over theorising and speculation. They decried the use of hypotheses and system-building without recourse to experiment and, in some quarters, developed a (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Noga Arikha (2005). Deafness, Ideas and the Language of Thought in the Late 1600s. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 13 (2):233 – 262.
  9. Sylvain Auroux (1985). The Analytic and the Synthetic as Linguistic Topics. Topoi 4 (2):193-199.
    The Analytic/Synthetic distinction did not originate in Kant, but in Port-Royal's logical theory. The key for the doctrine is the explicite recognition of two different kinds of relative clauses, e.g. explicative and determinative. In the middle eighteenth century the distinction becomes a topic within the grammars. Although we can find by grammarians different criteria for the distinction, these criteria (for which we can find medieval sources) are for the main predictable from the original theory of ideas, which was presented in (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Bernard Baertschi (1991). L'athéisme de Diderot. Revue Philosophique De Louvain 89 (3):421-449.
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Gary Banham (2011). The Antimonies of Pure Practical Libertine Reason. Angelaki 15 (1):13-27.
    In this article I revisit the relationship between Immanuel Kant and the Marquis De Sade, following not Jacques Lacan but Pierre Klossowski. In the process I suggest that Sade's work is marred by a series of antinomies that prevent him from stating a pure practical libertine reason and leave his view purely theoretical.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Sandrine Berges (2015). Sophie de Grouchy on the Cost of Domination in the Letters on Sympathy and Two Anonymous Articles in Le Republicain. The Monist 98:102-112.
    Political writings of eighteenth-century France have been so far mostly overlooked as a source of republican thought. Philosophers such as Condorcet actively promoted the ideal of republicanism in ways that can shed light on current debates. In this paper, I look at one particular source: Le Republicain, published in the summer 1791, focusing on previously unattributed articles by Condorcet’s wife and collaborator, Sophie de Grouchy. Grouchy, a philosopher in her own right, is beginning to be known for her Letters on (...)
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. François Bernier & Estienne Michallet (1682). Doutes de Mr. Bernier Sur Quelques-Uns des Principaux Chapitres de Son Abregé de la Philosophie de Gassendi. Chez Estienne Michallet, Ruë S. Jacques À l'Image S. Paul.
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. C. J. Betts (1984). Early Deism in France: From the so-Called "Déistes" of Lyon (1564) to Voltaire's "Lettres Philosophiques" (1734). Kluwer Academic Publishers.
    ... 'DEISTES' AT LYON, AND TWO CHARACTERS IN BODIN Deism, the religious attitude typical of the Enlightenment in France, England and elsewhere, ...
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Olivier René Bloch (1972). La Philosophic de Gassendi. Revista Portuguesa de Filosofia 28 (2):229-229.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Hilary Bok, Baron de Montesquieu, Charles-Louis de Secondat. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    Montesquieu was one of the great political philosophers of the Enlightenment. Insatiably curious and mordantly funny, he constructed a naturalistic account of the various forms of government, and of the causes that made them what they were and that advanced or constrained their development. He used this account to explain how governments might be preserved from corruption. He saw despotism, in particular, as a standing danger for any government not already despotic, and argued that it could best be prevented by (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Hélène Bouchilloux (forthcoming). La portée anti-cartésienne du fragment des trois ordres. Revue de Métaphysique et de Morale.
    Cet article vise à souligner la centrante de Laf.308, Br.793 au sein des Pensées, tout en déterminant sa portée anti-cartésienne. Une confrontation avec d'autres fragments connexes permet de préciser ce que Pascal met sous le deuxième ordre : une science relayée par la pensée, non la métaphysique cartésienne. Il devient alors possible de discuter l'interprétation de Jean-Luc Marion et de montrer que, loin d'opérer une simple destitution de la métaphysique cartésienne au nom de la charité chrétienne, Laf.308, Br.793 résume bien (...)
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Jacqueline Broad (2002). Women Philosophers of the Seventeenth Century. Cambridge University Press.
    In this rich and detailed study of early modern women's thought, Jacqueline Broad explores the complexity of women's responses to Cartesian philosophy and its intellectual legacy in England and Europe. She examines the work of thinkers such as Mary Astell, Elisabeth of Bohemia, Margaret Cavendish, Anne Conway and Damaris Masham, who were active participants in the intellectual life of their time and were also the respected colleagues of philosophers such as Descartes, Leibniz and Locke. She also illuminates the continuities between (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Genevi?Ve Brykman (1987). Bayle's Case for Spinoza. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 88:259 - 270.
  20. Edwin A. Burtt (1954/2003). The Metaphysical Foundations of Modern Science. Dover Publications.
    To the medieval thinker, man was the center of creation and all of nature existed purely for his benefit. The shift from the philosophy of the Middle Ages to the modern view of humanity's less central place in the universe ranks as the greatest revolution in the history of Western thought, and this classic in the philosophy of science describes and analyzes how the profound change occurred. A fascinating analysis of the works of Copernicus, Kepler, Galileo, Descartes, Hobbes, Gilbert, Boyle, (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Daniel Carey & Lynn Festa (eds.) (2009). The Postcolonial Enlightenment: Eighteenth-Century Colonialism and Postcolonial Theory. Oup Oxford.
    Leading scholars bring together eighteenth-century studies and postcolonial theory to analyze the role and reputation of Enlightenment in the context of early European colonial ambitions and postcolonial interrogations of Western imperial projects and aspirations.
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Desmond Clarke (forthcoming). François Poulain de la Barre. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. Desmond M. Clarke (1989). Occult Powers and Hypotheses: Cartesian Natural Philosophy Under Louis Xiv. Oxford University Press.
    This book analyses the concept of scientific explanation developed by French disciples of Descartes in the period 1660-1700. Clarke examines the views of authors such as Malebranche and Rohault, as well as those of less well-known authors such as Cordemoy, Gadroys, Poisson and R'egis. These Cartesian natural philosophers developed an understanding of scientific explanation as necessarily hypothetical, and, while they contributed little to new scientific discoveries, they made a lasting contribution to our concept of explanation--generations of scientists in subsequent centuries (...)
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. John J. Conley (2009). Adoration and Annihilation: The Convent Philosophy of Port-Royal. University of Notre Dame Press.
    A convent philosophy -- Mère Angélique Arnauld : virtue and grace -- Mère Agnès Arnauld : adoration and right -- Mère Angélique de Saint-Jean Arnauld d'Andilly : persecution and resistance -- A nocturnal philosophy.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. Monte Cook (2008). Desgabets as a Cartesian Empiricist. Journal of the History of Philosophy 46 (4):pp. 501-515.
    A long tradition regards Robert Desgabets as a Cartesian empiricist. He says things that sound strikingly like Locke, and he argues against anti-empiricist reasoning in Descartes, Malebranche, and Arnauld. Moreover, throughout his writings he endorses the empiricist principle that nothing is in the intellect except what was previously in the senses. Since the Cartesians are generally supposed to be prototypical non -empiricists, Desgabets’s being a Cartesian empiricist would make him a particularly interesting specimen. In this paper, however, I challenge the (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. Monte Cook (2005). Desgabets on the Creation of Eternal Truths. Journal of the History of Philosophy 43 (1):21-36.
  27. Monte Cook (2002). Robert Desgabets's Representation Principle. Journal of the History of Philosophy 40 (2):189-200.
    Monte Cook - Robert Desgabets's Representation Principle - Journal of the History of Philosophy 40:2 Journal of the History of Philosophy 40.2 189-200 Robert Desgabets's Representation Principle Monte Cook THE CARTESIAN PHILOSOPHER ROBERT DESGABETS'S only philosophical publication is his Critique de la Critique de la Recherche de la vérité , in which he criticizes Simon Foucher's criticism of Malebranche's Search After Truth. This work has never been republished and is now available only in rare book collections. Desgabets also wrote several (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. Monte Cook (1974). Arnauld's Alleged Representationalism. Journal of the History of Philosophy 12 (1):53-62.
  29. Richard J. Cummins (1991). Arnauld and the Cartesian Philosophy of Ideas. International Philosophical Quarterly 31 (4):505-506.
  30. Peter Dear (1987). Jesuit Mathematical Science and the Reconstitution of Experience in the Early Seventeenth Century. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 18 (2):133-175.
  31. des Chene, Suárez on Propinquity and the Efficient Cause.
    In the Principles, Descartes declares that of the four Aristotelian causes, he will retain only one: the efficient. Though some natural philosophers argued on behalf of the final cause, and others held that form could be rehabilitated, the efficient cause was in fact the only one of the four to flourish in the new philosophy. Descartes’ claim would lead one to believe that he preserved the efficient cause—that here, at least, we find continuity. But it is reasonable to wonder whether, (...)
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. Dennis des Chene, Natural Laws and Divine Agency in the Later Seventeenth Century.
    It is a commonplace that one of the primary tasks of natural science is to discover the laws of nature. Those who don’t think that nature has laws will of course disagree; but of those who do, most will be in accord with Armstrong when he writes that natural science, having discovered the kinds and properties of things, should “state the laws” which those things “obey” (Armstrong What is a law 3). No Scholastic philosopher would have included the discovery of (...)
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. Karen Detlefsen (2013). Emilie du Châtelet Between Leibniz and Newton. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 21 (1):207-209.
    British Journal for the History of Philosophy, Volume 21, Issue 1, Page 207-209, January 2013.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. Thomas Docherty (1999). Criticism and Modernity: Aesthetics, Literature, and Nations in Europe and its Academies. Oup Oxford.
    Can subjective taste regulate social norms or political practices? This book argues that from the late seventeenth century to the present national cultures have sought to regulate the democratic subject through the academic form of arguments about the proper relations of aesthetics to ethics and politics. In so doing it offers a radical reconsideration of the history of modernity, tracing the emergence of criticism as a socio-cultural practice across all the major European nations, and drawing on an extensive range of (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. Lisa Downing (2012). Maupertuis on Attraction as an Inherent Property of Matter. In Janiak Schliesser (ed.), Interpreting Newton.
    Pierre Louis Moreau de Maupertuis’ famous and influential Discours sur les différentes figures des astres, which represented the first public defense of attractionism in the Cartesian stronghold of the Paris Academy, sometimes suggests a metaphysically agnostic defense of gravity as simply a regularity. However, Maupertuis’ considered account in the essay, I argue, is much more subtle. I analyze Maupertuis’ position, showing how it is generated by an extended consideration of the possibility of attraction as an inherent property and fuelled by (...)
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. Lisa Downing (2004). Old History and Introductory Teaching in Early Modern Philosophy. In J. B. Schneewind (ed.), Teaching New Histories of Philosophy. 19-28.
  37. L. H. E. (1956). Leibniz in France From Arnauld to Voltaire. Review of Metaphysics 9 (4):700-700.
  38. Patricia Easton (2011). The Cartesian Doctor, François Bayle (1622–1709), on Psychosomatic Explanation. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 42 (2):203-209.
    There are two standing, incompatible accounts of Descartes’ contributions to the study of psychosomatic phenomena that pervade histories of medicine, psychology, and psychiatry. The first views Descartes as the father of “rational psychology” a tradition that defines the soul as a thinking, unextended substance. The second account views Descartes as the father of materialism and the machine metaphor. The consensus is that Descartes’ studies of optics and motor reflexes and his conception of the body-machine metaphor made early and important contributions (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. Howard T. Egan (1984). Gassendi's View of Knowledge a Study of the Epistemological Basis of His Logic. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. Lorne Falkenstein (2005). Condillac's Paradox. Journal of the History of Philosophy 43 (4):403-435.
    : I argue that Condillac was committed to four mutually inconsistent propositions: that the mind is unextended, that sensations are modifications of the mind, that colours are sensations, and that colours are extended. I argue that this inconsistency was not just the blunder of a second-rate philosopher, but the consequence of a deep-seated tension in the views of early modern philosophers on the nature of the mind, sensation, and secondary qualities and that more widely studied figures, notably Condillac's contemporaries, Hume (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. Madeleine Fields (1963). Voltaire and Rameau. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 21 (4):457-465.
  42. William Forgie (2007). Gassendi and Kant on Existence. Journal of the History of Philosophy 45 (4):511 - 523.
    : In rejecting Descartes's ontological proof for the existence of God, Gassendi maintained that existence is not a property and Kant said that it is not a "real predicate." It is commonly supposed that both are making the same claim. Some have even thought that they advance essentially the same argument for that same claim. I believe none of this is correct. Gassendi and Kant offer different arguments. And they are arguing for different conclusions. These differences stem from a more (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. Daniel Garber & Steven M. Nadler (eds.) (2006). Oxford Studies in Early Modern Philosophy. Oxford University Press.
    Oxford Studies in Early Modern Philosophy focuses on the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries--the extraordinary period of intellectual flourishing that begins, very roughly, with Descartes and his contemporaries and ends with Kant. It also publishes papers on thinkers or movements outside of that framework, provided they are important in illuminating early modern thought.
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. Pierre Gassendi, François Bernier, Jean Anisson, Claude Posuel & Rigaud (1684). Abregé de la Philosophie de Gassendi En Vii. Tomes. Chez Anisson, Posuel & Rigaud.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. Pierre Gassendi, Samuel Sorbière & Adriaan Vlacq (1659). Syntagma Philosophiae Epicuri Cum Refutationibus Dogmatum Quae Contra Fidem Christianam Ab Eo Asserta Sunt ... Praefigitur Samuelis Sorberii Dissertatio de Vita Ac Moribus Petri Gassendi. Ex Typographia Adriani Vlacq.
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. Stephen Gaukroger (2012). What Does History Matter to the History of Philosophy? Journal of the Philosophy of History 5 (3):406-424.
    Abstract Contrary to most modern interpretations, in the early modern period, history was an indispensable resource for many philosophers. The different uses of history by Bacon, Gassendi, Locke, and Hume are explored to establish the role of history as a resource in early-modern philosophy.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. Geoffrey Gorham (2009). God and the Natural World in the Seventeenth Century: Space, Time, and Causality. Philosophy Compass 4 (5):859-872.
    The employment by seventeenth-century natural philosophers of stock theological notions like creation, immensity, and eternity in the articulation and justification of emerging physical programs disrupted a delicate but longstanding balance between transcendent and immanent conceptions of God. By playing a prominent (if not always leading) role in many of the major scientific developments of the period, God became more intimately involved with natural processes than at any time since antiquity. In this discussion, I am particularly concerned with the causal and (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. Felicia Gottmann (2012). Du Châtelet, Voltaire, and the Transformation of Mandeville's Fable. History of European Ideas 38 (2):218-232.
    Summary In about 1735, Emilie Du Châtelet began to translate Mandeville's Fable of the Bees. Her work, which is largely ignored by scholars, did, as this article demonstrates, turn out to be one of transformation rather than of translation and came at a crucial moment in the emerging French luxury debate. So far commercial society and luxury had been defended in purely economic terms, for instance in Melon's Essai politique, or as an aspect of divine providence for fallen man, by (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  49. T. Gregory (1992). Gassendi, Pierre-Commemorating the Quadricentennial of His Birth. Giornale Critico Della Filosofia Italiana 12 (2):202-226.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  50. Keith Gunderson (1964). Descartes, La Mettrie, Language, and Machines. Philosophy 39 (149):193 - 222.
1 — 50 / 131