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17th/18th Century Philosophy

Edited by Brandon Look (University of Kentucky)
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  1. added 2014-08-17
    James Noxon (1988). Alternative Readings: Hume and His Commentators. In S. Tweyman (ed.), Early Modern Philosophy II. Caravan Books.
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  2. added 2014-08-17
    David Fate Norton (1988). John Wilson: Hume's First Printer. British Library Journal 14:123-135.
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  3. added 2014-08-17
    David Fate Norton (1987). Baron Hume's Request: The Hume Manuscripts and Their First Use. Royal Society of Edinburgh.
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  4. added 2014-08-17
    David Pears (1986). The Naturalism of Book 1 of Hume's Treatise of Human Nature. In Kenny (ed.), Rationalism, Empiricism and Idealism. Clarendon.
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  5. added 2014-08-15
    Dorit Barchana‐Lorand (2014). Educating Sentiment: Hume's Contribution to the Philosophy of the Curriculum Regarding the Teaching of Art. Journal of Philosophy of Education 48 (2).
    From the perspective of art education, the worst-case philosophical scenario is the hedonist-subjectivist account of art. If we measure art by the pleasure we gain from it, it may seem senseless to attempt teaching the reception of art. David Hume's ‘Of the Standard of Taste’ provides an argument for the art-education enthusiast, explaining that—even on a subjectivist account—art education crystallises our own preferences. While I refer to a historical debate and provide a close reading of an 18th-century essay, my goal (...)
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  6. added 2014-08-14
    Maria Rosa Antognazza (forthcoming). Theory and Praxis in Leibniz’s Theological Thought. In Irena Backus, Wenchao Li & Hartmut Rudolph (eds.), G. W. Leibniz im Lichte der Theologien [Leibniz in the Light of Theology]. Steiner.
    This paper re-assesses the place of theology in Leibniz’s thought focusing on the relationship between theory and praxis. It takes as its point of departure a general conclusion established in previous work, namely that Leibniz’s key formulations of his overarching plan for the reform and advancement of all the sciences, are devoted to a set of objectives which is both shaped by broadly theological concerns and ultimately practical. Against this backdrop, the discussion will then turn to an exploration of how (...)
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  7. added 2014-08-11
    Lydia B. Amir (2014). Shaftesbury—An Important Forgotten Indirect Source of Kierkegaard's Thought. Kierkegaard Studies Yearbook 19 (1).
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  8. added 2014-08-11
    Review by: Susanne Sreedhar (2014). Review: David Dyzenhaus and Thomas Poole Eds., Hobbes and the Law. [REVIEW] Ethics 124 (4):894-899,.
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  9. added 2014-08-10
    Richard T. Murphy (1991). Husserl and Hume: Overcrowding Scepticism? Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology 22:30-44.
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  10. added 2014-08-09
    Eric S. Nelson (2001). Kant and the Art of Political Prudence. In R. Horstmann V. Gerhardt (ed.), Kant und die Berliner Aufklärung. Walter de Gruyter. 220–227.
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  11. added 2014-08-08
    Corey W. Dyck, Between Wolffianism and Pietism: Baumgarten’s Rational Psychology.
    One of the primary targets in the Pietists’ campaign against the Wolffian philosophy was Wolff’s rational psychology. Taking issue particularly with Wolff’s account of the nature of the human soul and a spirit in general, the results of his demonstration of the immortality of the soul, and most of all his defense of the system of pre-established harmony, the Pietists contended that these central Wolffian doctrines were incompatible with our moral practice and with core theological claims. For his part, Wolff (...)
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  12. added 2014-08-08
    Corey W. Dyck, Materialism in the Mainstream of Early German Philosophy.
    Discussions of the reception of materialist thought in Germany in the first half of the 18th century tend to focus, naturally enough, upon the homegrown freethinkers who advanced the cause of Lucretius, Hobbes, and Spinoza in clandestine publications and frequently courted the ire of the state for doing so. If the philosophers belonging to the mainstream of German intellectual life in that period are accorded a place in the story, it is only insofar as they actively set themselves against the (...)
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  13. added 2014-08-08
    Corey W. Dyck, Beyond the Paralogisms: Kant on the Soul’s Immortality in the Lectures on Metaphysics.
    Considered in light of the reader’s expectation of a thoroughgoing criticism of the pretensions of the rational psychologist, and of the wealth of discussions available in the broader 18th century context, which includes a variety of proofs that do not explicitly turn on the identification of the soul as a simple substance, Kant’s discussion of immortality in the Paralogisms falls lamentably short. However, outside of the Paralogisms (and the published works generally), Kant had much more to say about the arguments (...)
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  14. added 2014-08-08
    Karolina Hübner (forthcoming). Spinoza's Thinking Substance and the Necessity of Modes. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research.
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  15. added 2014-08-08
    Karolina Hübner (forthcoming). Spinoza's Parallelism Doctrine and Metaphysical Sympathy. In Eric Schliesser Christa Mercer (ed.), Sympathy: Oxford Philosophical Concepts.
    This paper argues that Spinoza's famous 'parallelism doctrine', put forth in E2p7,c,s, be read as a revival of the ancient metaphysical doctrine of sympathy -- of the idea of an order, or connection, of things (connexio rerum). The paper shows that it is the following two concepts that are most important for understanding this aspect of Spinoza's parallelism doctrine: (i) the Cartesian and Scholastic categories of “formal” and “objective” “reality”; (ii) the notion of identity. For, the paper argues, for Spinoza (...)
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  16. added 2014-08-06
    Andrea Sangiacomo (2013). Nota Sul Ruolo Dell’"Essentia Corporis" Nell’Etica di Spinoza. Isonomia. Online Philosophical Journal of the University of Urbino Andquot;Carlo Bo&Quot;:1-19.
    This paper outlines the role of the bodily essence in Spinoza’s epistemology. Spinoza maintains in the Ethics that the power of the imagination depends on bodily affections and it explains the inadequateness of imaginative ideas. However, Spinoza also exploits the capabilities of the human body to work out his account of common notions, which grounds the adequate knowledge provided by reason. Moreover, the essentia corporis plays a crucial role in the fifth part of the Ethics. Indeed, the “eternal part” of (...)
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  17. added 2014-08-06
    George Couvalis (2011). A Modern Malignant Demon? Hume's Scepticism with Regard to Reason (Partly) Vindicated. In Craig Taylor Stephen Buckle (ed.), Hume and the Enlightenment. Chatto and Pickering. 105-115.
  18. added 2014-08-06
    Peter Jones (1990). On Reading Hume’s History of Liberty. In N. Capaldi & D. Livingston (eds.), Liberty in Hurne’s History of England. Dordrecht: Kluwer.
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  19. added 2014-08-05
    Sven Nyholm (forthcoming). Kant's Universal Law Formula Revisited. Metaphilosophy.
    Kantians are increasingly deserting the universal law formula in favor of the humanity formula. The former, they argue, is open to various decisive objections; the two are not equivalent (since the latter, but not the former asserts a basic substantive value judgment); and it is only by appealing to the humanity formula that Kant can reliably generate substantive implications from his theory of an acceptable sort. These assessments of the universal law formula, which clash starkly with Kant’s own assessment of (...)
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  20. added 2014-08-04
    Richard McCarty (2012). Humean Courage. In Ilya Kasavin (ed.), Hume and Contemporary Philosophy. Cambridge Scholars Publishing.
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  21. added 2014-08-04
    Marie A. Martin (1991-2). Misunderstanding and Understanding Hume's Moral Philosophy: An Essay on Hume's Place in Moral Philosophy by Nicholas Capaldi. Interpretation: A Journal of Political Philosophy 19:169-183..
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  22. added 2014-08-04
    R. A. Mall (1991). Die Ohnmacht der Vernunft in der Moral: Anmerkungen Zu Hume Und Schopenhauer. Schopenhauer Jahr 72: 67-76.
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  23. added 2014-08-04
    Robert McRae (1991). Hume as a Political Philosopher. In Livingston & Martin (eds.), Hume as Philosopher of Society, Politics and History. University of Rochester Press.
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  24. added 2014-08-04
    Ernest C. Mossner (1991). Was Hume a Tory Historian. In D. Livingston & M. Martin (eds.), Hume as Philosopher of Society, Politics and History. University of Rochester Press.
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  25. added 2014-08-04
    Mary Mothersill (1989). Hume and the Paradox of Taste. In G. Dickie (ed.), Aesthetics: A Critical Anthology. St. Martin's.
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  26. added 2014-08-04
    Peter Jones (ed.) (1989). The Science of Man in the Scottish Enlightenment. Edinburgh University Press.
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  27. added 2014-08-04
    William Edward Morris (1988). Hume’s Refutation of Inductive Probabilism. In Fetzer (ed.), Probability and Causality. Dordrecht.
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  28. added 2014-08-04
    Daiches & P. Jones (eds.) (1986). A Hotbed of Genius: The Scottish Enlightenment. Edinburgh University Press.
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  29. added 2014-08-03
    Rebecca Kukla (1992). Causation as a Natural and as a Philosophical Relation. Eidos 10: 161-178.
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  30. added 2014-08-03
    Marcia Lind (1990). Hume and Moral Emotions. In Flanagan & Rorty (eds.), Identity, Character, and Morality: Essays in Moral Psychology,. MIT Press.
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  31. added 2014-08-03
    Sherwin Klein (1989). Hume's Argument for the Moral Sense in the Treatise. Dialogos 24:25-50.
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  32. added 2014-08-02
    Rik Peels (2014). Hume's Law Violated? Journal of Value Inquiry 48 (3):449-455.
    Introduction: Prinz’s SentimentalismMany ethicists claim that one cannot derive an ought from an is. In others words, they think that one cannot derive a statement that has prescriptive force from purely descriptive statements. This thesis plays a crucial role in many theoretical and practical ethical arguments. Since, according to many, David Hume advocated a view along these lines, this thesis has been called ‘Hume’s Law’. In this paper, I adopt this widespread terminology, whether or not Hume did indeed take this (...)
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  33. added 2014-08-02
    Angela Coventry & Avram Hiller (2014). Hume on Animals and the Rest of Nature. In John Hadley & Elisa Aaltola (eds.), Animal Ethics and Philosophy. Rowman and Littlefield International.
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  34. added 2014-08-02
    Galen Strawson (2013). 'On "Humean&Quot;'. In https://www.academia.edu/. 1–6.
    In metaphysics, the adjective ‘Humean’ is standardly used to describe positions that deny the existence of any necessary connection or causal influence in concrete reality. This usage has been significantly reinforced by David Lewis’s employment of ‘Humean’ in the phrase ‘Humean supervenience’. It is, however, most unclear that this usage is appropriate, and Lewis himself raised a doubt about it.
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  35. added 2014-08-02
    Shier Ju (1993). The Unsolvability of Hume’s Problem and the Local Justification of Induction. Epistemologia 16:77-95.
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  36. added 2014-08-02
    Peter Jones (1989). Hume and the Beginnings of Modern Aesthetics. In , The Science of Man in the Scottish Enlightenment. Edinburgh University Press.
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  37. added 2014-08-02
    Peter Jones (1986). David Hume. In Daiches & P. Jones (eds.), A Hotbed of Genius: The Scottish Enlightenment. Edinburgh University Press.
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  38. added 2014-08-01
    Mavis Biss (forthcoming). Kantian Moral Striving. Kantian Review.
    In this paper I argue that a dominant strand of Kant’s approach to moral striving in the Doctrine of Virtue does not fit familiar models of striving in that Kant makes it very difficult to conceptualize a fit between the end of moral perfection and the means that could be taken to pursue “strengthened” maxims. I outline a revised account of moral contemplation that addresses my worry regarding means-end fit. My account corrects notable deficiencies in existing approaches to Kantian moral (...)
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  39. added 2014-07-31
    Michaela Rehm & Bernd Ludwig (eds.) (2012). John Locke, „Zwei Abhandlungen über die Regierung“. Akademie-Verlag.
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  40. added 2014-07-29
    Thaddeus S. Robinson (2011). 17th Century Theories of Substance. Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy 1 (1):1.
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  41. added 2014-07-28
    David Hyder (2014). Review of Michael Friedman, Kant’s Construction of Nature. [REVIEW] Isis 105 (2).
  42. added 2014-07-28
    Jason Gaiger (2014). Costelloe, Timothy M. The British Aesthetic Tradition: From Shaftesbury to Wittgenstein. Cambridge University Press, 2013, X + 350 Pp., 11 B&W Illus., $34.99 Paper. [REVIEW] Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 72 (3):335-337.
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  43. added 2014-07-28
    Christia Mercer (2014). Prefacing the Theodicy. In Larry M. Jorgensen & Samuel Newlands (eds.), New Essays on Leibniz's Theodicy. Oxford University Press. 13-42.
    The Preface to Leibniz's famous Theodicy offers a perspective on the work that has been insufficiently studied. In this paper, I ask that we step back from the main text of the Theodicy and attend to its Preface. I show that the latter performs two crucial preparatory tasks that have not been properly appreciated. The first is to offer a public declaration of what I call Leibniz’s radical rationalism. The Preface assumes that any attentive rational being is capable of divine (...)
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  44. added 2014-07-28
    Émilie du Châtelet & Lydia Patton (2014). On the Divisibility and Subtlety of Matter. In L. Patton (ed.), Philosophy, Science, and History. Routledge. 332-42.
    Translation for this volume by Lydia Patton of Chapter 9 (pages 179-200) of Émilie du Châtelet's Institutions de Physique (Foundations of Physics). Original publication date 1750. Paris: Chez Prault Fils.
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  45. added 2014-07-28
    Helen Hattab (2014). Hobbes's and Zabarella's Methods: A Missing Link. Journal of the History of Philosophy 52 (3):461-485.
    early modern philosophers commonly appeal to a mathematical method to demonstrate their philosophical claims. Since such claims are not always followed by what we would recognize as mathematical proofs, they are often dismissed as mere rhetoric. René Descartes, Thomas Hobbes, and Benedict de Spinoza are perhaps the most well-known early modern philosophers who fall into this category. It is a matter of dispute whether the ordo geometricus amounts to more than a method of presentation in Spinoza’s philosophy. Descartes and Hobbes (...)
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  46. added 2014-07-28
    Christia Mercer (2014). The Methodology of the Meditations: Tradition and Innovation. In David Cunning (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Descartes’ Meditations. Cambridge University Press. 23-47.
    Descartes intended to revolutionize seventeenth-century philosophy and science. But first he had to persuade his contemporaries of the truth of his ideas. Of all his publications, Meditations on First Philosophy is methodologically the most ingenuous. Its goal is to provoke readers, even recalcitrant ones, to discover the principles of “first philosophy.” The means to its goal is a reconfiguration of traditional methodological strategies. The aim of this chapter is to display the methodological strategy of the Meditations. The text’s method is (...)
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  47. added 2014-07-28
    Hein van den Berg (2014). Kant's Organicism: Epigenesis and the Development of Critical Philosophy. International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 28 (1):99-101.
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  48. added 2014-07-25
    John Russell Roberts (forthcoming). Axiarchism and Selectors. Faith and Philosophy.
    This essay offers a defense of Axiarchism's answer to the question, "Why does the world exit?" against prominent objections leveled against it by Derek Parfit. Parfit rejects the Axiarchist answer while abstracting from it his own Selector strategy. I argue that the abstraction fails, and that even if we were to regard Axiarchism as an instance of a Selector hypothesis, we should regard it as the only viable one. I also argue that Parfit's abstraction leads him to mistake the nature (...)
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  49. added 2014-07-22
    Katherine A. East (2014). Superstitionis Malleus: John Toland, Cicero, and the War on Priestcraft in Early Enlightenment England. History of European Ideas 40 (7):965-983.
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  50. added 2014-07-20
    Tyler Doggett, Moving Cartesian Bodies.
    Argues that Descartes's commitment to mind-body causation leads to a commitment to body-body causation.
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1 — 50 / 107