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17th/18th Century Philosophy

Edited by Brandon Look (University of Kentucky)
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  1. added 2016-05-23
    Christian Maurer (2016). Thomas Ahnert, The Moral Culture of Scottish Enlightenment, 1690–1805. Journal of Scottish Philosophy 14 (2):200-205.
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  2. added 2016-05-23
    Emily Dumler-Winckler (2016). Silvia Sebastiani, The Scottish Enlightenment: Race, Gender and the Limits of Progress. Journal of Scottish Philosophy 14 (2):208-211.
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  3. added 2016-05-22
    Owen Ware (2014). Skepticism in Kant's Groundwork. European Journal of Philosophy 24 (1).
    This paper offers a new interpretation of Kant's relationship with skepticism in the Groundwork for the Metaphysics of Morals. My position differs from commonly held views in the literature in two ways. On the one hand, I argue that Kant's relationship with skepticism is active and systematic. On the other hand, I argue that the kind of skepticism Kant is interested in does not speak to the philosophical tradition in any straightforward sense. On my reading, Kant takes up a skeptical (...)
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  4. added 2016-05-20
    Hermann Cohen & Lydia Patton (2015). The Relationship of Logic to Physics, From the Introduction to the Ninth Edition of Lange’s History of Materialism (1914). In Sebastian Luft (ed.), The Neo-Kantian Reader. Routledge
    A translation of one section of Hermann Cohen's introduction to Friedrich Albert Lange's History of Materialism.
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  5. added 2016-05-20
    Hermann Cohen, David Hyder & Lydia Patton (2015). Introduction From The Principle of the Infinitesimal Method and Its History (1883). In Sebastian Luft (ed.), The Neo-Kantian Reader. Routledge
    A translation of the Introduction to Hermann Cohen's 1883 work The Principle of the Infinitesimal Method and Its History.
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  6. added 2016-05-19
    Catherine Legg & James Franklin (2015). Perceiving Necessity. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 97 (1):n/a-n/a.
    In many diagrams one seems to perceive necessity – one sees not only that something is so, but that it must be so. That conflicts with a certain empiricism largely taken for granted in contemporary philosophy, which believes perception is not capable of such feats. The reason for this belief is often thought well-summarized in Hume's maxim: ‘there are no necessary connections between distinct existences’. It is also thought that even if there were such necessities, perception is too passive or (...)
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  7. added 2016-05-18
    Catherine Kemp (forthcoming). "The False Hume in Pragmatism". The Pluralist.
    The atomist Hume inherited by classical American pragmatism is a false Hume. I trace the origins and reception of the atomist Hume in the pragmatic tradition and the correction of this reading in modern Hume scholarship, and then argue (1) that in the Treatise Hume assumes that we first encounter wholes, not parts, in experience, (2) that the distinction of parts is possible only after the experience of wholes, and (3) that their distinction as well as their separation is not (...)
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  8. added 2016-05-18
    Catherine Kemp (forthcoming). "Dewey's Darwin and Darwin's Hume". The Pluralist.
    In The Influence of Darwin on Philosophy (1910), Dewey characterizes Hume as an orthodox empiricist wedded to a static and unchanging view of mental life. The lead essay argues that Darwinism is a cure for the errors of traditional empiricism. This paper demonstrates that Hume is a precursor to Darwin, and thus to Dewey, by reviewing the historical case that Hume directly influenced Darwin’s theory of evolution. Using Dewey’s discussion of the design versus chance problem, the paper throws light on (...)
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  9. added 2016-05-18
    Timothy M. Costelloe (2016). Don Garrett, Hume. Journal of Scottish Philosophy 14 (2):165-170.
  10. added 2016-05-18
    Nathan Sasser (2016). Jacqueline A. Taylor, Reflecting Subjects: Passion, Sympathy, and Society in Hume's Philosophy. Journal of Scottish Philosophy 14 (2):183-187.
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  11. added 2016-05-18
    Miren Boehm (2016). Hume's Foundational Project in the Treatise. European Journal of Philosophy 24 (1):55-77.
    In the Introduction to the Treatise Hume very enthusiastically announces his project to provide a secure and solid foundation for the sciences by grounding them on his science of man. And Hume indicates in thethat he carries out this project in the Treatise. But most interpreters do not believe that Hume's project comes to fruition. In this paper, I offer a general reading of what I call Hume's ‘foundational project’ in the Treatise, but I focus especially on Book 1. I (...)
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  12. added 2016-05-18
    Wade L. Robison (2016). James Harris, Hume: An Intellectual Biography. Journal of Scottish Philosophy 14 (2):137-151.
  13. added 2016-05-18
    R. Jessop, Thomas Brown: Negotiating a Position Between Hume and Reid.
  14. added 2016-05-18
    Peter Baumann (2011). Molyneux's Question and the Berkeleian Answer. In Jean Paul Margot & Mauricio Zuluaga (eds.), Jean Paul Margot & Mauricio Zuluaga (eds.), Perspectivas de la Modernidad. Siglos XVI, XVII y XVIII. Colección Artes y Humanidades 217-234.
    Amongst those who answered Molyneux’s question in the negative or at least not in the positive, George Berkeley is of particular interest because he argued for a very radical position. Most of his contribution to the discussion can be found in his Essay towards a New Theory of Vision. I will give an exposition of his view (2) and then move on to a critical discussion of this kind of view, - what one could call the “Berkeleian view” (3). I (...)
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  15. added 2016-05-16
    Corey W. Dyck, Kant on Wolff's General Logic.
    In this paper, I consider the basis for Kant's praise of Wolff's general logic as "the best we have." I argue that Wolff's logic was highly esteemed by Kant on account of its novel analysis of the three operations of the mind (tres operationes mentis), in the course of which Wolff formulates an argument for the priority of the understanding's activity of judging.
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  16. added 2016-05-16
    Hemmo Laiho (forthcoming). Kant on Representing Negative States of Affairs. Topoi:1-12.
    In this paper, I investigate Kant’s view of the cognitive role of perceptions, judgements, and the three categories of Quality in representing negative states of affairs. The paper addresses the following problem. In his account of empirical cognition, Kant seems to limit the legitimate application of the categories to things perceptually available to us, or, more generally, to positive cases. However, Kant also seems to hold that negative states of affairs, such as the absence of a thing, cannot be perceived. (...)
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  17. added 2016-05-16
    Éric Marquer (2016). Le signe et les fondements de la certitude chez Hobbes. Methodos 16.
    Hobbes établit une distinction entre signes certains et signes incertains, qui correspond à la distinction entre science et prudence. Mais il précise toutefois que les signes de la science ne sont pas tous certains, ni infaillibles. Cette recommandation n’est pas tant une critique de la science, qu’une mise en garde adressée à ceux qui renoncent à leur jugement naturel et s’en remettent aveuglément à l’autorité des livres. La certitude dépend donc d’un bon usage des signes de la part du sujet (...)
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  18. added 2016-05-14
    Fabian Dorsch (2016). Hume. In Amy Kind (ed.), The Routledge Handbook of Philosophy of Imagination. Routledge 40-54.
    This chapter overviews Hume’s thoughts on the nature and role of imagining and focusses primarily on three important distinctions that Hume draws among our conscious mental episodes: (i) between impressions and ideas; (ii) between ideas of the memory and ideas of the imagination; and (iii), among the ideas of the imagination, between ideas of the judgement and ideas of the fancy. In addition, the chapter considers Hume’s views on the imagination as a faculty of producing ideas, as well as on (...)
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  19. added 2016-05-13
    Stewart Duncan, Materialism and the Activity of Matter in Seventeenth-Century European Philosophy.
    Draft for Philosophy Compass. New version of 23 May 2016. Early modern debates about the nature of matter interacted with debates about whether matter could think. In particular, some philosophers (e.g., Cudworth and Leibniz) objected to materialism about the human mind on the grounds that matter is passive, thinking things are active, and one cannot make an active thing out of passive material. This paper begins by looking at two seventeenth-century materialist views (Hobbes’s, and one suggested but not endorsed by (...)
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  20. added 2016-05-13
    Douglas Hedley, Sarah Hutton & David Leech (eds.) (forthcoming). Cambridge Platonism: Sources and Legacies.
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  21. added 2016-05-13
    Michael J. Olson (forthcoming). Kant on Anatomy and the Status of the Life Sciences. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A.
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  22. added 2016-05-12
    Marius Stan (forthcoming). Rationalist Foundations and the Science of Force. In Brandon Look & Frederick Beiser (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of German Eighteenth-Century Philosophy. Oxford University Press
  23. added 2016-05-12
    Peter Knox-Shaw (2016). Coleridge, Erasmus Darwin, and the Naturalizing of Deceit in *Christabel*, Review of English Studies, (2016), 67 (279), Pp. 316-333. Review of English Studies 67 (279):316-333.
    Erasmus Darwin gave the first comprehensive account of biological mimicry, a phenomenon which he boldly attributed to the instinct for self-preservation in both the plant and animal kingdoms, and ascribed histologically to an involuntary mode of imitation. Coleridge's interest in his idea of physical adaptation can be traced back to 'The Eolian Harp' but becomes central in *Christabel* where it provides, through the vehicle of Bracy's dream, a unifying metaphor for Geraldine's successful strategy of passing herself off for what she (...)
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  24. added 2016-05-12
    Lydia Moland (2002). Fight, Flight, or Respect? First Encounters of the Other in Kant and Hegel. History of Philosophy Quarterly 19 (4):381-400.
  25. added 2016-05-11
    Jani Hakkarainen (2015). Hume on Spatial Properties. In Guigon Ghislain & Rodriguez-Pereyra Gonzalo (eds.), Nominalism about Properties. Routledge 79-94.
    I defend a reading of David Hume’s nominalism that he comes close to Keith Campbell's contemporary trope theory in the specific case of spatial properties. I argue that Hume's view should be construed as classifying spatial properties as Campbellian tropes (particular properties): abstract, particular, determinate and qualitatively simple properties. This has implications for reconstructing Hume's answer to the problem of universals. I argue that Hume’s account of objects resembling each other in respect of spatial properties (...)
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  26. added 2016-05-11
    Jani Hakkarainen (2012). Hume as a Trope Nominalist. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 42 (supl1):55-66.
    In this paper, I argue that Hume's solution to a problem that contemporary metaphysicians call “the problem of universals” would be rather trope-theoretical than some other type of nominalism. The basic idea in different trope theories is that particular properties, i.e., tropes are postulated to account for the fact that there are particular beings resembling each other. I show that Hume's simple sensible perceptions are tropes: simple qualities. Accordingly, their similarities are explained by these tropes themselves and their resemblance. Reading (...)
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  27. added 2016-05-10
    Max Barkhausen, Hume’s Correction of the Sentiments. Intersubjectivity Without Objectivity.
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  28. added 2016-05-10
    Max Barkhausen (2016). Hume’s Correction of the Sentiments. Intersubjectivity Without Objectivity. Ergo, an Open Access Journal of Philosophy 3.
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  29. added 2016-05-10
    R. Martinelli (2010). Entre toucher et sentiment. Herder et le « Gefühl ». Esercizi Filosofici 5:1-7.
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  30. added 2016-05-10
    Alfred Ayer (2001). Hume: A Very Short Introduction. Oxford University Press Uk.
    Hume is one of the greatest of all British philosophers, and even in his own lifetime was celebrated as one of the pivotal figures of the Enlightenment. Hume's 'naturalist' approach to a wide variety of philosophical topics resulted in highly original theories about perception, self-identity, causation, morality, politics, and religion, all of which are discussed in this stimulating introduction by A J Ayer, himself one of the twentieth century's most important philosophers. Ayer also gives an account of Hume's fascinating life (...)
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  31. added 2016-05-10
    R. Martinelli (1998). Il canto della natura. Herder, Goethe, Chladni e la “monadologia musicale” nel primo Romanticismo. Intersezioni 18:85-102.
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  32. added 2016-05-08
    Dennis Schulting (forthcoming). Review: Corey Dyck's "Kant and Rational Psychology". [REVIEW] Studi Kantiani 29.
    This is a review of Corey Dyck's "Kant and Rational Psychology" (OUP 2014), in which among other things I criticise Dyck's claim that in the Critique Kant no longer identifies the "I think" with the "I am". (forthcoming in Studi kantiani XXIX 2016).
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  33. added 2016-05-07
    Daniel E. Flage (2015). Ethics in Alciphron. In Sebastien Charles (ed.), Berkeley Revisited: Moral, Social and Political Philosophy. Voltaire Foundation 53-68.
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  34. added 2016-05-07
    Pascal Taranto (2015). Le travail de la sagesse: philosophie et exercice spirituel chez George Berkeley. In Sebastien Charles (ed.), Berkeley Revisited: Moral, Social and Political Philosophy. Voltaire Foundation 259-276.
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  35. added 2016-05-06
    Marta Szymanska-Lewoszewska (2015). Berkeley's Double Understanding of 'Social Appetite'. In Sebastien Charles (ed.), Berkeley Revisited: Moral, Social and Political Philosophy. Voltaire Foundation 147-160.
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  36. added 2016-05-06
    Melissa Frankel (2015). Actions, Behaviors, and Volitions in Berkeley's Moral Philosophy. In Sebastien Charles (ed.), Berkeley Revisited: Moral, Social and Political Philosophy. Voltaire Foundation 99-114.
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  37. added 2016-05-06
    Hugh Hunter (2015). Berkeley on Doing Good and Meaning Well. In Sebastien Charles (ed.), Berkeley Revisited: Moral, Social and Political Philosophy. 131-146.
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  38. added 2016-05-06
    Timo Airaksinen (2015). Vulgar Thoughts: Berkeley on Responsibility and Freedom. In Sebastien Charles (ed.), Berkeley Revisited: Moral, Social and Political Philosophy. Voltaire Foundation 115-130.
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  39. added 2016-05-06
    Scott Breuninger (2015). Improving the Health of the Nation: Berkeley, Virtue and Ireland. In Sebastien Charles (ed.), Berkeley Revisited: Moral, Social and Political Philosophy. 161-176.
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  40. added 2016-05-06
    Heta Aleksandra Gylling (2015). Berkeley as a Worldly Philosopher. In Sebastien Charles (ed.), Berkeley Revisited: Moral, Social and Political Philosophy. Voltaire Foundation 23-36.
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  41. added 2016-05-06
    Richard J. Van Iten (2015). Berkeley's Pragmatic Bent: Its Implications for His Social Philosophy. In Sebastien Charles (ed.), Berkeley Revisited: Moral, Social and Political Philosophy. Voltaire Foundation 83-98.
  42. added 2016-05-06
    Jeremy Girard (2015). La bonne societe d'apres Berkeley: entre education religieuse et coutume raisonnable. In Sebastien Charles (ed.), Berkeley Revisited: Moral, Social and Political Philosophy. Voltaire Foundation 227-242.
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  43. added 2016-05-06
    Nancy Kendrick (2015). Berkeley's Bermuda Project and The Ladies Library. In Sebastien Charles (ed.), Berkeley Revisited: Moral, Social and Political Philosophy. Voltaire Foundation 243-258.
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  44. added 2016-05-06
    Sebastien Charles (2015). De Pascal a Locke: la reprise berkeleyenne des enjeux philosophiques concernant la tolerance religieuse et civile. In Berkeley Revisited: Moral, Social and Political Philosophy. Voltaire Foundation 177-190.
  45. added 2016-05-06
    Marc A. Hight (2015). Berkeley on Economic Bubbles. In Sebastien Charles (ed.), Berkeley Revisited: Moral, Social and Political Philosophy. Voltaire Foundation 191-208.
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  46. added 2016-05-06
    Adam Grzelinski (2015). George Berkeley's Understanding of Beauty and His Polemic with Shaftesbury. In Sebastien Charles (ed.), Berkeley Revisited: Moral, Social and Political Philosophy. Voltaire Foundation 209-226.
  47. added 2016-05-05
    David Landy (forthcoming). Recent Scholarship on Hume's Theory of Mental Representation. European Journal of Philosophy.
    In a recent paper Karl Schafer argues that Hume’s theory of mental representation has two distinct components, unified by their shared feature of having accuracy conditions. As Schafer sees it, simple and complex ideas represent the intrinsic imagistic features of their objects whereas abstract ideas represent the relations or structures in which multiple objects stand. This distinction, however, is untenable for at least two related reasons. Firstly, complex ideas represent the relations or structures in which the impressions that are the (...)
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  48. added 2016-05-05
    Jonathan Head, Anna Tomaschewska, Jochen Bojanowski, Alberto Vanzo & Sorin Baiasu (2016). Introduction: Kant and Sartre – Existentialism and Critical Philosophy. In Sorin Baiasu (ed.), Comparing Kant and Sartre. Palgrave MacMillan 3-17.
    Kant and Sartre are two of the most significant figures in modern philosophy, and yet there has, until very recently, been little comparative research undertaken on them. Despite dealing with many shared philosophical issues, they have traditionally been taken to be too opposed to each other to render any search for possible parallels between their works a useful enterprise. Indeed, Sartre is often taken to be one of Kant’s most vocal critics in the literature, and as rather indebted to other (...)
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  49. added 2016-05-04
    Jason R. Fisette (forthcoming). Hume on the Stoic Rational Passions and "Original Existences.". Journal of the History of Philosophy.
    I argue that Hume’s characterization of the passions as “original existences” is shaped by his preoccupation with Stoicism, and is not (as most commentators suppose) a ridiculous or trifling remark. My argument has three parts. First, I show that Hume’s description of the passions as “original existences” is properly understood as part of his argument against the possibility of passions caused by reason alone (rational passions). Second, I establish that Hume was responding to the Stoics, who claimed that a rational (...)
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  50. added 2016-05-03
    Daniel Dohrn, Erkennen und Handeln. Descartes' Ideal eines rationalen Willens.
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1 — 50 / 208