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17th/18th Century Philosophy

Edited by Brandon Look (University of Kentucky)
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  1. added 2014-10-22
    Remy Debes (2014). Editorial Introduction: Scottish Reactions to Mandeville. Journal of Scottish Philosophy 12 (1):v-viii.
    Given a steady increase of interest in 18th Scottish philosophy it isn't surprising that Mandeville is also enjoying a new wave of interest. On the one hand, Mandeville had an especially obvious influence on Scottish Enlightenment thought. As the contributions in this volume demonstrate, the Scots took Mandeville very seriously, more so than any other collective audience at the time. In The Fable, the Scots saw fundamental challenges, not mere rabble-rousing social commentary. On the other hand, an essential aspect of (...)
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  2. added 2014-10-21
    Owen Ware (forthcoming). Rethinking Kant's Fact of Reason. Philosophers' Imprint.
    Kant’s doctrine of the Fact of Reason is one of the most perplexing aspects of his moral philosophy. The aim of this paper is to defend Kant’s doctrine from the common charge of dogmatism. My defense turns on a previously unexplored analogy to the notion of ‘matters of fact’ popularized by members of the Royal Society in the seventeenth century. In their work, ‘facts’ were beyond doubt, often referring to experimental effects one could witness first hand. While Kant uses the (...)
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  3. added 2014-10-20
    Kenneth L. Pearce, How Berkeley's Gardener Knows His Cherry Tree.
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  4. added 2014-10-20
    Charles Marsh (2014). Public Relations as a Quest for Justice: Resource Dependency, Reputation, and the Philosophy of David Hume. Journal of Mass Media Ethics 29 (4):210-224.
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  5. added 2014-10-20
    Alex Espinoza (2014). Pragmatic Interpretation of Belief Systems in Hume and Peirce. Cinta de Moebio 50:101-110.
    In philosophical literature the issue of beliefs has been identified historically with David Hume and common sense. Beliefs are dynamic systems and its resignification is constant. Charles Sanders Pierce would interpret the fixation of beliefs, as those ones which are fixed by means of art, being this a method well-tuned with science. Truths established in beliefs are always probable and dependent on the degree of utility they have. The degree of utility is complemented with comprehension, explanations have multiple causes. En (...)
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  6. added 2014-10-20
    Hilla Jacobson-Horowitz (2008). Externalist Trends in Descartes' Thought. Iyyun 58:1-33.
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  7. added 2014-10-18
    Julia Jorati (forthcoming). Leibniz's Twofold Gap Between Moral Knowledge and Motivation. British Journal for the History of Philosophy:1-19.
    Moral rationalists and sentimentalists traditionally disagree on at least two counts, namely regarding the source of moral knowledge or moral judgements and regarding the source of moral motivation. I will argue that even though Leibniz's moral epistemology is very much in line with that of mainstream moral rationalists, his account of moral motivation is better characterized as sentimentalist. Just like Hume, Leibniz denies that there is a necessary connection between knowing that something is right and the motivation to act accordingly. (...)
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  8. added 2014-10-18
    John Henry (forthcoming). David Leech: The Hammer of the Cartesians: Henry More's Philosophy of Spirit and the Origins of Modern Atheism. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion:1-5.
    Henry More (1614–1687), the most influential of the so-called Cambridge Platonists, and arguably the leading philosophically-inclined theologian in late seventeenth-century England, has come in for renewed attention lately. He was the subject of a detailed intellectual biography in 2003 by Robert Crocker, and in 2012 Jasper Reid published a philosophically penetrating and enlightening study of More’s metaphysics (Crocker 2003; Reid 2012). David Leech’s study of More’s idiosyncratic concept of immaterial spirit—and the role that it plays in his philosophy and theology—is (...)
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  9. added 2014-10-18
    John Smith (1660/1979). Select Discourses. Scholar’s Facsimiles and Reprints.
    Reprinted with Introduction by C. A. Patrides. Delmar, NY: Scholar’s Facsimiles and Reprints, 1979.
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  10. added 2014-10-17
    Joshua M. Wood (forthcoming). Causality and Mind: Essays on Early Modern Philosophy. British Journal for the History of Philosophy:1-3.
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  11. added 2014-10-16
    Joshua M. Wood (forthcoming). Review of Nicholas Jolley's Causality and Mind: Essays on Early Modern Philosophy (2013). [REVIEW] British Journal for the History of Philosophy.
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  12. added 2014-10-14
    Jessica Gordon-Roth (forthcoming). Catharine Trotter Cockburn's Defense of Locke. The Monist.
    Catharine Trotter Cockburn is best known for her Defence of Mr. Locke’s Essay of Human Understanding (1702). However very little has been said about Trotter’s treatment of Locke’s metaphysical commitments therein. In this paper I give a brief description of the history of Trotter’s Defence. Thereafter I focus on two (of the many) objections to which Trotter responds on Locke’s behalf: 1) the objection that Locke has not proved the soul immortal, and 2) the objection that Locke’s view leads to (...)
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  13. added 2014-10-11
    Michael Bennett McNulty (2014). Kant on Chemistry and the Application of Mathematics in Natural Science. Kantian Review 19 (3):393-418.
    In his Metaphysische Anfangsgründe der Naturwissenschaft, Kant claims that chemistry is a science, but not a proper science (like physics), because it does not adequately allow for the application of mathematics to its objects. This paper argues that the application of mathematics to a proper science is best thought of as depending upon a coordination between mathematically constructible concepts and those of the science. In physics, the proper science that exhausts the a priori knowledge of objects of the outer sense, (...)
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  14. added 2014-10-11
    Jorge Conceição (2014). O gemüt E as doenças da cabeça: O lado obscuro da antropologia. Philósophos - Revista de Filosofia 19 (1):63-96.
    This paper aims to reconstruct the idea of a human nature in Kant through the operation of the cognitive faculties. To accomplish this task, we will problematize the sensitivity from the point of view of head’s diseases, which allow us to understand the functioning of human nature from the cognitive faculties. Investigating human nature, through cognitive faculties, means that we will interrogate it about the prospect of what are the material conditions that make possible the feasibility of a priori synthetic (...)
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  15. added 2014-10-11
    Hein van den Berg (2014). Kant on Proper Science: Biology in the Critical Philosophy and the Opus Postumum. Springer Science + Business Media.
  16. added 2014-10-11
    Bruce Rosenstock (2014). “God … has Sent Me to Germany”: Salomon Maimon, Friedrich Jacobi, and the Spinoza Quarrel. Southern Journal of Philosophy 52 (3):287-315.
    Salomon Maimon's Versuch über die Transzendentalphilosophie [Essay in Transcendental Philosophy] (1790) challenges and reworks Kant's arguments in the Kritik der reinen Vernunft [Critique of Pure Reason] (1785, 2nd ed. 1787) about the foundations of natural science and of Newtonian physics in particular. Kant himself was impressed both with Maimon's grasp of his critical project and also with the force of his challenge to it. While Maimon's significance on the later development of German Idealism is now widely acknowledged, another aspect of (...)
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  17. added 2014-10-11
    Tomás Prado (2014). Kant, Hegel, Foucault and Unreason in History: The Philosophical Canon of the History of Madness. Trans/Form/Ação 37 (2):197-218.
    Este artigo propõe relacionar as filosofias da história de Kant e de Hegel às bases do pensamento de Foucault, em História da loucura na idade clássica. Buscamos reconhecer, não indícios de uma história cosmopolita ou universal, mas em que medida o pensamento crítico e a filosofia como ciência das essências puras comparecem na inteligibilidade histórica de Foucault. A reunião de uma diversidade de experiências sob o conceito de desatino (déraison, desrazão), fio condutor da obra, sugere uma proximidade com a tradição. (...)
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  18. added 2014-10-11
    Robert Pippin (2014). The Significance of Self‐Consciousness in Idealist Theories of Logic. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 114 (2pt2):145-166.
    Among Kant's innovations in the understanding of logic (‘general logic’) were his claims that logic had no content of its own, but was the form of the thought of any possible content, and that the unit of meaning, the truth-bearer, judgement, was essentially apperceptive. Judging was implicitly the consciousness of judging. This was for Kant a logical truth. This article traces the influence of the latter claim on Fichte, and, for most of the discussion, on Hegel. The aim is to (...)
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  19. added 2014-10-11
    Gabriele Gava (2014). Kant's Definition of Science in the Architectonic of Pure Reason and the Essential Ends of Reason. Kant-Studien 105 (3).
    Name der Zeitschrift: Kant-Studien Jahrgang: 105 Heft: 3 Seiten: 372-393.
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  20. added 2014-10-11
    Karin de Boer (2011). Kant, Hegel, and the System of Pure Reason. In Elena Ficara (ed.), Die Begründung der Philosophie im Deutschen Idealismus. Königshausen und Neumann. 77-87.
    Since the 1970s, debates about Hegel’s Science of Logic have largely turned around the metaphysical or non-metaphysical nature of this work. This debate has certainly issued many important contributions to Hegel scholarship. Yet it presupposes, in my view, a set of oppositions that thwart an adequate assessment of Hegel’s indebtedness to Kant. I hope to show in this paper that Hegel is deeply indebted to Kant, but not to the Kant who is commonly brought into play to argue for the (...)
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  21. added 2014-10-11
    Karin de Boer (2011). Transformations of Transcendental Philosophy: Wolff, Kant, and Hegel. Bulletin of the Hegel Society of Great Britain 32 (1-2):50-79.
    Shedding new light on Kant’s use of the term ‘transcendental’ in the Critique of Pure Reason, this article aims to determine the elements that Kant’s transcendental philosophy has in common with Wolffian ontology as well as the respects in which Kant turns against Wolff. On this basis I argue that Wolff’s, Kant’s and Hegel’s conceptions of metaphysics – qua first philosophy – have a deeper affinity than is commonly assumed. Bracketing the issue of Kant’s alleged subjectivism, I challenge the opposition (...)
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  22. added 2014-10-08
    Sandra Field (forthcoming). Hobbes and Human Irrationality. Global Discourse.
    Hobbes’s science of politics rests on a dual analysis of human beings: humans as complex material bodies in a network of mechanical forces, prone to passions and irrationality; and humans as subjects of right and obligation, morally exhortable by appeal to the standards of reason. The science of politics proposes an absolutist model of politics. If this proposal is not to be idle utopianism, the enduring functioning of the model needs to be compatible with the materialist analysis of human behaviour. (...)
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  23. added 2014-10-02
    Giovanni B. Grandi (2014). The Extension of Color Sensations: Reid, Stewart, and Fearn. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 41 (S1).
    It seems to be a consequence of Reid’s views on sensations that colour sensations are not extended nor are they arranged in figured patterns. Reid further claimed that ‘there is no sensation appropriated to visible figure.’ As I show, Reid tried to justify these controversial claims by appeal to Cheselden’s report of the experiences of a young man affected by severe cataracts, and by appeal to cases of perception of visible figure without colour. While holding fast to the principle that (...)
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  24. added 2014-10-02
    Giovanni B. Grandi (ed.) (2012). Thomas Reid: Selected Philosophical Writings. Imprint Academic.
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  25. added 2014-09-24
    Charles T. Wolfe (2014). On the Role of Newtonian Analogies in Eighteenth-Century Life Science:Vitalism and Provisionally Inexplicable Explicative Devices. In Zvi Biener & Eric Schliesser (eds.), Newton and Empiricism. Oxford UP. 223-261.
    Newton’s impact on Enlightenment natural philosophy has been studied at great length, in its experimental, methodological and ideological ramifications. One aspect that has received fairly little attention is the role Newtonian “analogies” played in the formulation of new conceptual schemes in physiology, medicine, and life science as a whole. So-called ‘medical Newtonians’ like Pitcairne and Keill have been studied; but they were engaged in a more literal project of directly transposing, or seeking to transpose, Newtonian laws into quantitative models of (...)
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  26. added 2014-09-24
    Patrick Brissey (2014). Rule VIII of Descartes’ Regulae Ad Directionem Ingenii. Journal of Early Modern Studies 3 (2).
    On the developmental reading, Descartes first praised his method in the first instance of Rule VIII of the Regulae ad directionem ingenii, but then demoted it to provisional in the “blacksmith” analogy, and then found his discrete method could not resolve his “finest example,” his inquiry into the essence and scope of human knowledge, an event that, on this reading, resulted in him dropping his method. In this paper, I explain how Rule VIII can be read as a coherent title (...)
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  27. added 2014-09-23
    Osvaldo Ottaviani (2014). From “Possible Worlds” to “Possible Experience”. Real Possibility in Leibniz and Kant. Kant Yearbook 6 (1).
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  28. added 2014-09-23
    Enrico Pasini (2013). Teleologia in Leibniz E Husserl. Brevi Note a Partire da Un Inedito Leibniziano. Discipline Filosofiche 23 (2):21-36.
    This paper takes its start from the unpublished Leibnizian manuscript of which a critical edition and an Italian translation are presented by the Author in the same issue of “Discipline filosofiche‘ -- in particular from some passages concerning what we might roughly call teleological projections. A parallel analysis of Leibniz’s and Husserl’s attitudes to the attribution of teleological properties, at various levels of complexity, factuality, ideality, to the natural world and to human history, shows in Husserl’s teleology a mix of (...)
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  29. added 2014-09-23
    Stephan Körner (1984). Über philosophische Methoden und Argumente. Grazer Philosophische Studien 22:27-39.
    Hauptthema des Aufsatzes sind philosophische Methoden und Argumente, welche der Begründung allgemeingültiger, philosophischer Prinzipien dienen sollen. Es wird gezeigt, daß die Cartesianische Methode des Zweifels, die transzendentale Methode Kants und die phänomenologische Methode Husserls diese Aufgabe nicht erfüllen, daß sie aber, wenn man von ihren Ausschließlichkeitsansprüchen absieht, wichtige Einsichten enthalten. Selbst die sogenannte "wissenschaftliche" und die sogenannte "linguistische" Methode erweisen sich trotz ihrer Zirkularität als nicht völlig wertlos. Der Aufsatz schließt mit einigen Bemerkungen über Argumentationsweisen, welche bescheidenere Ziele verfolgen und (...)
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  30. added 2014-09-22
    Jack A. Hill (2014). Iain McDaniel, Adam Ferguson in the Scottish Enlightenment: The Roman Past and Europe's Future. Cambridge, U.S.A. And London: Harvard University Press, 2013. X + 276 Pp. $45.00 (Cloth), £29.95 (Hbk). ISBN 9780674072961. [REVIEW] 12 (2):243-248.
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  31. added 2014-09-22
    Corijn van Mazijk (2014). Kant, Husserl, McDowell: The Non-Conceptual in Experience. Diametros 41:99-114.
    In this paper I compare McDowell′s conceptualism to Husserl′s later philosophy. I aim to argue against the picture provided by recent phenomenologists according to which both agree on the conceptual nature of experience. I start by discussing McDowell′s reading of Kant and some of the recent Kantian and phenomenological non-conceptualist criticisms thereof. By separating two kinds of conceptualism, I argue that these criticisms largely fail to trouble McDowell. I then move to Husserl’s later phenomenological analyses of types and of passive (...)
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  32. added 2014-09-22
    Katherine Nicolai (2014). Adam Ferguson's Pedagogy and His Engagement with Stoicism. 12 (2):199-212.
    Adam Ferguson, lecturer of moral philosophy at the University of Edinburgh (1764–1785), was one of the leading figures of the Scottish Enlightenment. His published works, however, have sometimes been dismissed as derivative and viewed as less important than some of his contemporaries, because of his reliance on ancient Stoic philosophy. An analysis of Ferguson's lecture notes, conversely, demonstrates Stoicism's pedagogical function. Rather than adopting Stoic principles, Ferguson used their terminology to teach philosophical concepts. Ferguson's nuanced discussion of ancient philosophy in (...)
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  33. added 2014-09-21
    Hein van den Berg (2009). Kant on Vital Forces: Metaphysical Concerns Versus Scientific Practice. In E. O. Onnasch (ed.), Kants Philosophie der Natur. Ihre Entwicklung im Opus postumum und ihre WIrkung. Walter De Gruyter. 115-135.
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  34. added 2014-09-16
    Scott Stapleford (2014). Tetens' Refutation of Idealism and Properly Basic Belief. In Gideon Stiening Udo Thiel (ed.), Johann Nikolaus Tetens (1736-1807): Philosophie in der Tradition des europäischen Empirismus. De Gruyter. 147-168.
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  35. added 2014-09-16
    Wolfgang Ertl (2011). Kant and the Early Modern Scholastic Legacy: New Perspectives on Transcendental Idealism”. In Hubertus Busche (ed.), Departure for Modern Europe. A Handbook of Early Modern Philosophy. Meiner. 1178-1193.
    This paper attempts to shed light on Kant’s distinction between things in themselves and appearances. It draws on the early modern debate about the nature of divine knowledge which resonates in Kant’s lectures on metaphysics and natural theology. The problem as to how divine foreknowledge of human actions is compatible with their freedom is of particular relevance, since the solution to the problem of human freedom is at the core of transcendental idealism. Philosophers such as Molina take divine cognition of (...)
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  36. added 2014-09-16
    Wolfgang Ertl (2010). Persons as Causes in Kant. In Stephen R. Palmquist (ed.), Cultivating Personhood: Kant and Asian Philosophy. de Gruyter. 217-230.
    Drawing on recent Aristotelian readings of Kant's notion of natural causality with an emphasis on substances as causes, I will try to explain how persons can make a difference in the world of appearances by virtue of their rationality. For Kant, the clue is that the peculiar mode of a substance's natural causality supervenes on in-itself features, among which is the mode or character of the person's rationality. Thus, a wedge can be driven between natural necessity and metaphysical necessity, opening (...)
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  37. added 2014-09-15
    Marius Stan (forthcoming). Absolute Space and the Riddle of Rotation: Kant’s Response to Newton. Oxford Studies in Early Modern Philosophy 7.
    Beside theological grounds, Newton also has a fivefold kinematico-dynamical argument for absolute space, from “the properties, causes, and effects” of true motion. Like Newton, Kant holds that bodies have true motions. Unlike him, though, Kant takes all motion to be relative to matter, not absolute space. In consequence, he must respond to Newton’s argument above. In this paper, I reconstruct Kant’s answer, from his “Metaphysical Foundations of Phenomenology.” It turns out that Kant addresses just one part of Newton’s case, namely, (...)
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  38. added 2014-09-15
    Lena Halldenius (2014). Mary Wollstonecraft's Feminist Critique of Property: On Becoming a Thief From Principle. Hypatia 29 (4):942-957.
    The scholarship on Mary Wollstonecraft (1759–1797) is divided concerning her views on women's role in public life, property rights, and distribution of wealth. Her critique of inequality of wealth is undisputed, but is it a complaint only of inequality or does it strike more forcefully at the institution of property? The argument in this article is that Wollstonecraft's feminism is partly defined by a radical critique of property, intertwined with her conception of rights. Dissociating herself from the conceptualization of rights (...)
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  39. added 2014-09-15
    Patrick Brissey (2013). “Descartes’ Discours as a Plan for a Universal Science”. Studia UBB. Philosophia [Special Issue on Descartes' Scientific and Philosophical Disputes with His Contemporaries] 58 (No. 2).
    My thesis is that Descartes wrote the Discours as a plan for a universal science, as he originally entitled it. I provide an interpretation of his letters that suggests that after Descartes began drafting his Dioptrics, he started developing a system that incorporated his early treatises from the 1630s: Les Méteores, Le Monde, L’Homme, and his 1629 Traité de métaphysique. I argue against the mosaic and autobiographic interpretations that claim these were independent treatises or stages in Descartes’ life. Rather, I (...)
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  40. added 2014-09-15
    Patrick Brissey (2012). “Descartes and the Meteorology of the World”. Society and Politics [Special Issue on God and the Order of Nature in Early Modern Thought: Topics in Metaphysics, Epistemology, and Science] 6 (No. 2).
    Descartes claimed that he thought he could deduce the assumptions of his Meteorology by the contents of the Discourse. He actually began the Meteorology with assumptions. The content of the Discourse, moreover, does not indicate how he deduced the assumptions of the Meteorology. We seem to be left in a precarious position. We can examine the text as it was published, independent of Descartes’ claims, which suggests that he incorporated a presumptive or hypothetical method. On the other hand, we can (...)
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  41. added 2014-09-15
    Marius Stan (2011). Kant's Philosophy of Mechanics in 1758. In Oliver Thorndike (ed.), Rethinking Kant, vol. III. Cambridge Scholars. 158-179.
  42. added 2014-09-15
    Alfredo Ferrarin (2001). Artificio, desiderio, considerazione di sé. Hobbes e i fondamenti antropologici della politica. ETS.
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  43. added 2014-09-12
    Andrew Chignell (forthcoming). Modal Motives for Noumenal Ignorance: Knowledge, Cognition, Coherence. Kant-Studien.
    Abstract: My goal in this paper is to show that Kant’s prohibition on certain kinds of knowledge of things-in-themselves is motivated less by his anti-soporific encounter with Hume than by his new view of the distinction between “real” and “logical” modality, a view that developed out of his reflection on the rationalist tradition in which he was trained. In brief: at some point in the 1770’s, Kant came to hold that a necessary condition on knowing a proposition is that one (...)
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  44. added 2014-09-12
    Andrew Chignell (forthcoming). Leibniz and Kant on Miracles: Rationalism, Religion, and the Laws. In Brandon Look (ed.), Leibniz and Kant. Oxford.
  45. added 2014-09-11
    E. Sonny Elizondo (forthcoming). More Than a Feeling. Canadian Journal of Philosophy:1-18.
    According to rationalist conceptions of moral agency, the constitutive capacities of moral agency are rational capacities. So understood, rationalists are often thought to have a problem with feeling. For example, many believe that rationalists must reject the attractive Aristotelian thought that moral activity is by nature pleasant. I disagree. It is easy to go wrong here because it is easy to assume that pleasure is empirical rather than rational and so extrinsic rather than intrinsic to moral agency, rationalistically conceived. Drawing (...)
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  46. added 2014-09-11
    Timothy Yenter (2014). Peter R. Anstey (Ed.), The Oxford Handbook of British Philosophy in the Seventeenth Century. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews:xx.
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  47. added 2014-09-10
    Sandra Raponi (2014). What is Required to Institutionalize Kant's Cosmopolitan Ideal? Journal of International Political Theory 10 (3):302-324.
    Although Kant argues that a world republic with coercive public law is the only rational way to secure a lawful cosmopolitan condition, he states that it is an unachievable ideal, and he proposes a voluntary, non-coercive federation of states as a substitute. While some scholars have criticized Kant for moving away from this ideal due merely to pragmatic considerations, I argue that his rejection of a coercive world republic is based on his conception of state sovereignty and what is required (...)
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  48. added 2014-09-06
    Stewart Duncan, Leibniz on the Expression of God.
    Draft paper. Leibniz frequently uses the notion of expression, but it is not easy to see just how he understood that relation. This paper focuses on the particular case of the expression of God, which is prominent in the 'Discourse on Metaphysics'. The treatment of expression there suggests several questions. Which substances did Leibniz believe expressed God? Why did Leibniz believe those substances expressed God? And did he believe that all substances expressed God in the same way and for the (...)
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  49. added 2014-09-06
    Eric Stencil, Antoine Arnauld. Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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  50. added 2014-09-05
    Lewis Powell (2014). Hume's Treatment of Denial in the Treatise. Philosophers' Imprint 14 (26).
    David Hume fancied himself the Newton of the mind, aiming to reinvent the study of human mental life in the same way that Newton had revolutionized physics. And it was his view that the novel account of belief he proposed in his Treatise of Human Nature was one of that work’s central philosophical contributions. From the earliest responses to the Treatise forward, however, there was deep pessimism about the prospects for his account. It is easy to understand the source of (...)
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