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17th/18th Century Philosophy

Edited by Brandon Look (University of Kentucky)
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  1. added 2014-09-23
    Enrico Pasini (2013). Teleologia in Leibniz E Husserl. Brevi Note a Partire da Un Inedito Leibniziano. Discipline Filosofiche 23 (2):21-36.
    This paper takes its start from the unpublished Leibnizian manuscript of which a critical edition and an Italian translation are presented by the Author in the same issue of “Discipline filosofiche‘ -- in particular from some passages concerning what we might roughly call teleological projections. A parallel analysis of Leibniz’s and Husserl’s attitudes to the attribution of teleological properties, at various levels of complexity, factuality, ideality, to the natural world and to human history, shows in Husserl’s teleology a mix of (...)
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  2. added 2014-09-23
    Stephan Körner (1984). Über philosophische Methoden und Argumente. Grazer Philosophische Studien 22:27-39.
    Hauptthema des Aufsatzes sind philosophische Methoden und Argumente, welche der Begründung allgemeingültiger, philosophischer Prinzipien dienen sollen. Es wird gezeigt, daß die Cartesianische Methode des Zweifels, die transzendentale Methode Kants und die phänomenologische Methode Husserls diese Aufgabe nicht erfüllen, daß sie aber, wenn man von ihren Ausschließlichkeitsansprüchen absieht, wichtige Einsichten enthalten. Selbst die sogenannte "wissenschaftliche" und die sogenannte "linguistische" Methode erweisen sich trotz ihrer Zirkularität als nicht völlig wertlos. Der Aufsatz schließt mit einigen Bemerkungen über Argumentationsweisen, welche bescheidenere Ziele verfolgen und (...)
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  3. added 2014-09-22
    Katherine Nicolai (2014). Adam Ferguson's Pedagogy and His Engagement with Stoicism. 12 (2):199-212.
    Adam Ferguson, lecturer of moral philosophy at the University of Edinburgh (1764–1785), was one of the leading figures of the Scottish Enlightenment. His published works, however, have sometimes been dismissed as derivative and viewed as less important than some of his contemporaries, because of his reliance on ancient Stoic philosophy. An analysis of Ferguson's lecture notes, conversely, demonstrates Stoicism's pedagogical function. Rather than adopting Stoic principles, Ferguson used their terminology to teach philosophical concepts. Ferguson's nuanced discussion of ancient philosophy in (...)
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  4. added 2014-09-22
    Jack A. Hill (2014). Iain McDaniel, Adam Ferguson in the Scottish Enlightenment: The Roman Past and Europe's Future. Cambridge, U.S.A. And London: Harvard University Press, 2013. X + 276 Pp. $45.00 (Cloth), £29.95 (Hbk). ISBN 9780674072961. [REVIEW] 12 (2):243-248.
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  5. added 2014-09-22
    Corijn van Mazijk (2014). Kant, Husserl, McDowell: The Non-Conceptual in Experience. Diametros 41:99-114.
    In this paper I compare McDowell′s conceptualism to Husserl′s later philosophy. I aim to argue against the picture provided by recent phenomenologists according to which both agree on the conceptual nature of experience. I start by discussing McDowell′s reading of Kant and some of the recent Kantian and phenomenological non-conceptualist criticisms thereof. By separating two kinds of conceptualism, I argue that these criticisms largely fail to trouble McDowell. I then move to Husserl’s later phenomenological analyses of types and of passive (...)
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  6. added 2014-09-21
    Hein van den Berg (2009). Kant on Vital Forces: Metaphysical Concerns Versus Scientific Practice. In E. O. Onnasch (ed.), Kants Philosophie der Natur. Ihre Entwicklung im Opus postumum und ihre WIrkung. Walter De Gruyter. 115-135.
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  7. added 2014-09-19
    Hein van den Berg (2014). Kant on Proper Science: Biology in the Critical Philosophy and the Opus Postumum. Springer Science + Business Media.
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  8. added 2014-09-17
    Scott Stapleford (2014). Tetens' Refutation of Idealism and Properly Basic Belief. In Gideon Stiening Udo Thiel (ed.), Johann Nikolaus Tetens (1736-1807): Philosophie in der Tradition des europäischen Empirismus. De Gruyter. 147-168.
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  9. added 2014-09-16
    Wolfgang Ertl (2011). Kant and the Early Modern Scholastic Legacy: New Perspectives on Transcendental Idealism”. In Hubertus Busche (ed.), Departure for Modern Europe. A Handbook of Early Modern Philosophy. Meiner. 1178-1193.
    This paper attempts to shed light on Kant’s distinction between things in themselves and appearances. It draws on the early modern debate about the nature of divine knowledge which resonates in Kant’s lectures on metaphysics and natural theology. The problem as to how divine foreknowledge of human actions is compatible with their freedom is of particular relevance, since the solution to the problem of human freedom is at the core of transcendental idealism. Philosophers such as Molina take divine cognition of (...)
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  10. added 2014-09-16
    Wolfgang Ertl (2010). Persons as Causes in Kant. In Stephen R. Palmquist (ed.), Cultivating Personhood: Kant and Asian Philosophy. de Gruyter. 217-230.
    Drawing on recent Aristotelian readings of Kant's notion of natural causality with an emphasis on substances as causes, I will try to explain how persons can make a difference in the world of appearances by virtue of their rationality. For Kant, the clue is that the peculiar mode of a substance's natural causality supervenes on in-itself features, among which is the mode or character of the person's rationality. Thus, a wedge can be driven between natural necessity and metaphysical necessity, opening (...)
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  11. added 2014-09-15
    Marius Stan (forthcoming). Absolute Space and the Riddle of Rotation: Kant’s Response to Newton. Oxford Studies in Early Modern Philosophy 7.
    Besides theological grounds, Newton also has a fivefold kinematico-dynamical argument for absolute space, from “the properties, causes, and effects” of true motion. Like Newton, Kant holds that bodies have true motions. Unlike him, though, Kant declares all motion to be relative to matter, not absolute space. In consequence, he must respond to Newton’s argument above. In this paper, I reconstruct in detail Kant’s answer, from his “Metaphysical Foundations of Phenomenology.” It turns out that Kant addresses just one part of Newton’s (...)
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  12. added 2014-09-15
    Lena Halldenius (2014). Mary Wollstonecraft's Feminist Critique of Property: On Becoming a Thief From Principle. Hypatia 29 (3).
    The scholarship on Mary Wollstonecraft (1759–1797) is divided concerning her views on women's role in public life, property rights, and distribution of wealth. Her critique of inequality of wealth is undisputed, but is it a complaint only of inequality or does it strike more forcefully at the institution of property? The argument in this article is that Wollstonecraft's feminism is partly defined by a radical critique of property, intertwined with her conception of rights. Dissociating herself from the conceptualization of rights (...)
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  13. added 2014-09-15
    Patrick Brissey (2013). “Descartes’ Discours as a Plan for a Universal Science”. Studia UBB. Philosophia [Special Issue on Descartes' Scientific and Philosophical Disputes with His Contemporaries] 58 (No. 2).
    My thesis is that Descartes wrote the Discours as a plan for a universal science, as he originally entitled it. I provide an interpretation of his letters that suggests that after Descartes began drafting his Dioptrics, he started developing a system that incorporated his early treatises from the 1630s: Les Méteores, Le Monde, L’Homme, and his 1629 Traité de métaphysique. I argue against the mosaic and autobiographic interpretations that claim these were independent treatises or stages in Descartes’ life. Rather, I (...)
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  14. added 2014-09-15
    Patrick Brissey (2012). “Descartes and the Meteorology of the World”. Society and Politics [Special Issue on God and the Order of Nature in Early Modern Thought: Topics in Metaphysics, Epistemology, and Science] 6 (No. 2).
    Descartes claimed that he thought he could deduce the assumptions of his Meteorology by the contents of the Discourse. He actually began the Meteorology with assumptions. The content of the Discourse, moreover, does not indicate how he deduced the assumptions of the Meteorology. We seem to be left in a precarious position. We can examine the text as it was published, independent of Descartes’ claims, which suggests that he incorporated a presumptive or hypothetical method. On the other hand, we can (...)
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  15. added 2014-09-15
    Marius Stan (2011). Kant's Philosophy of Mechanics in 1758. In Oliver Thorndike (ed.), Rethinking Kant, vol. III. Cambridge Scholars. 158-179.
  16. added 2014-09-15
    Alfredo Ferrarin (2001). Artificio, desiderio, considerazione di sé. Hobbes e i fondamenti antropologici della politica. ETS.
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  17. added 2014-09-12
    Andrew Chignell (forthcoming). Modal Motives for Noumenal Ignorance: Knowledge, Cognition, Coherence. Kant-Studien.
    Abstract: My goal in this paper is to show that Kant’s prohibition on certain kinds of knowledge of things-in-themselves is motivated less by his anti-soporific encounter with Hume than by his new view of the distinction between “real” and “logical” modality, a view that developed out of his reflection on the rationalist tradition in which he was trained. In brief: at some point in the 1770’s, Kant came to hold that a necessary condition on knowing a proposition is that one (...)
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  18. added 2014-09-12
    Andrew Chignell (forthcoming). Leibniz and Kant on Miracles: Rationalism, Religion, and the Laws. In Brandon Look (ed.), Leibniz and Kant. Oxford.
  19. added 2014-09-11
    E. Sonny Elizondo (forthcoming). More Than a Feeling. Canadian Journal of Philosophy.
    According to rationalist conceptions of moral agency, the constitutive capacities of moral agency are rational capacities. So understood, rationalists are often thought to have a problem with feeling. For example, many believe that rationalists must reject the attractive Aristotelian thought that moral activity is by nature pleasant. I disagree. It is easy to go wrong here because it is easy to assume that pleasure is empirical rather than rational and so extrinsic rather than intrinsic to moral agency, rationalistically conceived. Drawing (...)
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  20. added 2014-09-11
    Timothy Yenter (2014). Peter R. Anstey (Ed.), The Oxford Handbook of British Philosophy in the Seventeenth Century. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews:xx.
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  21. added 2014-09-10
    Sandra Raponi (2014). What is Required to Institutionalize Kant's Cosmopolitan Ideal? Journal of International Political Theory 10 (3):302-324.
    Although Kant argues that a world republic with coercive public law is the only rational way to secure a lawful cosmopolitan condition, he states that it is an unachievable ideal, and he proposes a voluntary, non-coercive federation of states as a substitute. While some scholars have criticized Kant for moving away from this ideal due merely to pragmatic considerations, I argue that his rejection of a coercive world republic is based on his conception of state sovereignty and what is required (...)
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  22. added 2014-09-08
    Michael Bennett McNulty (forthcoming). Kant on Chemistry and the Application of Mathematics in Natural Science. Kantian Review 19 (3).
    In his Metaphysische Anfangsgründe der Naturwissenschaft (MAN), Kant claims that chemistry is a science, but not a proper science (like physics), because it does not adequately allow for the application of mathematics to its objects. In this paper, I argue that the application of mathematics to a proper science is best thought of as depending upon a coordination between mathematically constructible concepts and those of the science. In physics, the proper science that exhausts the a priori knowledge of objects of (...)
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  23. added 2014-09-06
    Stewart Duncan, Leibniz on the Expression of God.
    Draft paper. Leibniz frequently uses the notion of expression, but it is not easy to see just how he understood that relation. This paper focuses on the particular case of the expression of God, which is prominent in the 'Discourse on Metaphysics'. The treatment of expression there suggests several questions. Which substances did Leibniz believe expressed God? Why did Leibniz believe those substances expressed God? And did he believe that all substances expressed God in the same way and for the (...)
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  24. added 2014-09-06
    Eric Stencil, Antoine Arnauld. Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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  25. added 2014-09-05
    Miren Boehm (forthcoming). Hume's Definitions of 'Cause': Without Idealizations, Within the Bounds of Science. Synthese:1-17.
    Interpreters have found it exceedingly difficult to understand how Hume could be right in claiming that his two definitions of ‘cause’ are essentially the same. As J. A. Robinson points out, the definitions do not even seem to be extensionally equivalent. Don Garrett offers an influential solution to this interpretative problem, one that attributes to Hume the reliance on an ideal observer. I argue that the theoretical need for an ideal observer stems from an idealized concept of definition, which many (...)
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  26. added 2014-09-05
    Lewis Powell (2014). Hume's Treatment of Denial in the Treatise. Philosophers' Imprint 14 (26).
    David Hume fancied himself the Newton of the mind, aiming to reinvent the study of human mental life in the same way that Newton had revolutionized physics. And it was his view that the novel account of belief he proposed in his Treatise of Human Nature was one of that work’s central philosophical contributions. From the earliest responses to the Treatise forward, however, there was deep pessimism about the prospects for his account. It is easy to understand the source of (...)
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  27. added 2014-09-05
    Samuel Clark (2014). Hume's Uses of Dialogue. Hume Studies 39 (1):61-76.
    What does David Hume do with the dialogue form in Dialogues Concerning Natural Religion? I pursue this question in the context of a partial taxonomy of uses for the dialogue form in philosophy in general—although I want to emphasize the word “partial.” My driving concern here is Hume’s use of dialogue, not to list all possible uses of dialogue or to draw conclusions about the uses of dialogue in philosophy in general. My question sits between two other related questions: a (...)
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  28. added 2014-09-04
    Steven M. Bayne (2011). Marks, Images, and Rules. In Dennis Schulting & Jacco Verburgt (eds.), Kant's Idealism: New Interpretations of a Controversial Doctrine. Springer. 127-142.
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  29. added 2014-09-04
    John J. Callanan (2011). Normativity and the Acquisition of the Categories. Bulletin of the Hegel Society of Great Britain 63:1-26.
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  30. added 2014-09-04
    Alfredo Ferrarin (2006). Goodbye is Too Good a Word: Sulle difficoltà del congedo di Ferraris. In , Congedarsi da Kant? Interventi sul Goodbye Kant di Ferraris. ETS. 13-35.
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  31. added 2014-09-04
    Giovanni Boniolo (2001). Leggi trascendentali, metafisiche ed empiriche in Kant. In Giovanni Boniolo & Mauro Dorato (eds.), Leggi di natura: Analisi storico-critica di un concetto. McGraw-Hill. 101-153.
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  32. added 2014-09-04
    Andrew Carpenter (1995). Kant's (Problematic) Account of Empirical Concepts. In Robinson Hoke (ed.), Proceedings of the Eighth Inernational Kant Congress: Memphis, 1995. Marquette University Press. vol. 2, 227-234.
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  33. added 2014-09-04
    Erich Adickes (1924). Kant und das Ding and sich. Heise.
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  34. added 2014-09-02
    Kenneth L. Pearce, Arnauld's Verbal Distinction Between Ideas and Perceptions.
    In his dispute with Malebranche about the nature of ideas, Arnauld endorses a form of direct realism. This appears to conflict with views put forward by Arnauld and his collaborators in the Port-Royal Grammar and Logic where the distinction between verbs and nouns is based on a distinction between mental acts and their (internal, mind-dependent) objects. I show that, although Arnauld identifi es perceptions with ideas, he recognizes a distinction in meaning between the words `perception' and `idea,' and this distinction (...)
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  35. added 2014-09-02
    Eric S. Nelson (2014). Language, Nature, and the Self: The Feeling of Life in Kant and Dilthey. In Frank Schalow and Richard VelkleyVelkley (ed.), The Linguistic Dimension of Kant's Thought: Historical and Critical Essays. Northwestern University Press. 263-287.
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  36. added 2014-08-30
    John Callanan (2014). Mendelssohn and Kant on Mathematics and Metaphysics. Kant Yearbook 6 (1).
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  37. added 2014-08-30
    Michaela Rehm (2012). „The A. B. C. of Politicks“: Entstehungskontext und Rezeption von Lockes Zwei Abhandlungen über die Regierung. In Michaela Rehm & Bernd Ludwig (eds.), John Locke: „Zwei Abhandlungen über die Regierung“. Akademie-Verlag. 1-16.
    The paper is devoted to demonstrating the systematic value of the “Two Treatises of Government”. Even though their genesis is rooted in the political circumstances of Locke’s life-time, the “Treatises” are not simply a pamphlet designed to support the Whig cause, as Locke’s political ideas are derived from his theoretical philosophy and from his concept of natural law.
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  38. added 2014-08-30
    Karin de Boer (2011). Kant, Hegel, and the System of Pure Reason. In Elena Ficara (ed.), Die Begründung der Philosophie im Deutschen Idealismus. Königshausen und Neumann. 77-87.
    Since the 1970s, debates about Hegel’s Science of Logic have largely turned around the metaphysical or non-metaphysical nature of this work. This debate has certainly issued many important contributions to Hegel scholarship. Yet it presupposes, in my view, a set of oppositions that thwart an adequate assessment of Hegel’s indebtedness to Kant. I hope to show in this paper that Hegel is deeply indebted to Kant, but not to the Kant who is commonly brought into play to argue for the (...)
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  39. added 2014-08-30
    Karin de Boer (2004). The Dissolving Force of the Concept: Hegel’s Ontological Logic. Review of Metaphysics 57 (4):787-822.
  40. added 2014-08-27
    Kate Moran (forthcoming). Much Obliged: Kantian Gratitude Reconsidered. Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie.
    In his published texts and lectures on moral philosophy, Kant repeatedly singles out gratitude for discussion. Nevertheless, puzzles about the derivation, content, and nature of this duty remain. This paper seeks to solve some of these puzzles. Centrally, I argue that it is essential to attend to a distinction that Kant makes between well-wishing benevolence (Wohlwollen) and active beneficence (Wohlthun) on the part of a benefactor. On the Kantian account, I argue, a different type of gratitude is owed in response (...)
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  41. added 2014-08-25
    Steven Burgess (2012). Resolving the Question of Doubt: Geometrical Demonstration in the Meditations. Society and Politics 6 (2):43-62.
    The question of what Descartes did and did not doubt in the Meditations has received a significant amount of scholarly attention in recent years. The process of doubt in Meditation I gives one the impression of a rather extreme form of skepticism, while the responses Descartes offers in the Objections and Replies make it clear that there is in fact a whole background of presuppositions that are never doubted, including many that are never even entertained as possible candidates of doubt. (...)
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  42. added 2014-08-25
    Karin de Boer (2011). Transformations of Transcendental Philosophy: Wolff, Kant, and Hegel. Bulletin of the Hegel Society of Great Britain 32 (1-2):50-79.
    Shedding new light on Kant’s use of the term ‘transcendental’ in the Critique of Pure Reason, this article aims to determine the elements that Kant’s transcendental philosophy has in common with Wolffian ontology as well as the respects in which Kant turns against Wolff. On this basis I argue that Wolff’s, Kant’s and Hegel’s conceptions of metaphysics – qua first philosophy – have a deeper affinity than is commonly assumed. Bracketing the issue of Kant’s alleged subjectivism, I challenge the opposition (...)
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  43. added 2014-08-18
    Casey Rentmeester (2014). Leibniz and Huayan Buddhism: Monads as Modified Li? Lyceum 13 (1):36-57.
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  44. added 2014-08-17
    David Fate Norton (1988). John Wilson: Hume's First Printer. British Library Journal 14:123-135.
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  45. added 2014-08-17
    James Noxon (1988). Alternative Readings: Hume and His Commentators. In S. Tweyman (ed.), Early Modern Philosophy II. Caravan Books.
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  46. added 2014-08-17
    David Fate Norton (1987). Baron Hume's Request: The Hume Manuscripts and Their First Use. Royal Society of Edinburgh.
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  47. added 2014-08-17
    David Pears (1986). The Naturalism of Book 1 of Hume's Treatise of Human Nature. In Kenny (ed.), Rationalism, Empiricism and Idealism. Clarendon.
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  48. added 2014-08-15
    Dorit Barchana‐Lorand (2014). Educating Sentiment: Hume's Contribution to the Philosophy of the Curriculum Regarding the Teaching of Art. Journal of Philosophy of Education 48 (3).
    From the perspective of art education, the worst-case philosophical scenario is the hedonist-subjectivist account of art. If we measure art by the pleasure we gain from it, it may seem senseless to attempt teaching the reception of art. David Hume's ‘Of the Standard of Taste’ provides an argument for the art-education enthusiast, explaining that—even on a subjectivist account—art education crystallises our own preferences. While I refer to a historical debate and provide a close reading of an 18th-century essay, my goal (...)
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  49. added 2014-08-14
    Maria Rosa Antognazza (forthcoming). Theory and Praxis in Leibniz’s Theological Thought. In Irena Backus, Wenchao Li & Hartmut Rudolph (eds.), G. W. Leibniz im Lichte der Theologien [Leibniz in the Light of Theology]. Steiner.
    This paper re-assesses the place of theology in Leibniz’s thought focusing on the relationship between theory and praxis. It takes as its point of departure a general conclusion established in previous work, namely that Leibniz’s key formulations of his overarching plan for the reform and advancement of all the sciences, are devoted to a set of objectives which is both shaped by broadly theological concerns and ultimately practical. Against this backdrop, the discussion will then turn to an exploration of how (...)
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  50. added 2014-08-11
    Review by: Susanne Sreedhar (2014). Review: David Dyzenhaus and Thomas Poole Eds., Hobbes and the Law. [REVIEW] Ethics 124 (4):894-899,.
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