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William James
  1. Jonathan E. Adler (2005). William James and What Cannot Be Believed. The Harvard Review of Philosophy 13 (1):65-79.
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  2. Scott F. Aikin (2008). Evidentialism and James' Argument From Friendship. Southwest Philosophy Review 24 (1):173-180.
    William James' main argument in “The Will to Believe” against evidentialism is that there are facts that cannot come to be without a preliminary faith in their coming. James primarily makes this case with the argument from friendship. I will critically present James' argument from friendship and show that the argument does not yield a counter-example to evidentialism and is in the end unsound.
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  3. Gay Wilson Allen (1970). William James. Minneapolis,University of Minnesota Press.
    University of Minnesota Pamphlets on American Writers ; No. 88.
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  4. Holly Andersen (2014). The Development of the ‘Specious Present’ and James’ Views on Temporal Experience. In Dan Lloyd Valtteri Arstila (ed.), Subjective Time: the philosophy, psychology, and neuroscience of temporality. MIT Press. 25-42.
    This chapter examines the philosophical discussion concerning the relationship between time, memory, attention, and consciousness, from Locke through the Scottish Common Sense tradition, in terms of its influence on James' development of the specious present doctrine. The specious present doctrine is the view that the present moment in experience is non punctate, but instead comprises some nonzero amount of time; it contrasts with the mathematical view of the present, in which the divide between past and future is merely a point (...)
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  5. Holly Andersen & Rick Grush (2009). A Brief History of Time-Consciousness: Historical Precursors to James and Husserl. Journal of the History of Philosophy 47 (2):277-307.
    William James’ Principles of Psychology, in which he made famous the ‘specious present’ doctrine of temporal experience, and Edmund Husserl’s Zur Phänomenologie des inneren Zeitbewusstseins, were giant strides in the philosophical investigation of the temporality of experience. However, an important set of precursors to these works has not been adequately investigated. In this article, we undertake this investigation. Beginning with Reid’s essay ‘Memory’ in Essays on the Intellectual Powers of Man, we trace out a line of development of ideas about (...)
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  6. Doug Anderson (2003). Respectability and the Wild Beasts of the Philosophical Desert: The Heart of James's. Journal of Speculative Philosophy 17 (1):1-13.
    This commentary was suggested to me in part by a colleague's remark that it would be nice if we could make William James's The Varieties of Religious Experience "respectable." The implication was that though there was something redeemable about the book, it somehow wasn't philosophically or scientifically proper. The remark awakened me to—or at least reminded me of—the fact that this has been a traditional take on James's text. As Julius Bixler points out, ridicule began soon after the book was (...)
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  7. Douglas R. Anderson (2004). Philosophy as Teaching: James's "Knight Errant," Thomas Davidson. Journal of Speculative Philosophy 18 (3):239-247.
    In 1905 William James wrote an essay in McClure's Magazine recalling the importance to his own work of the Scottish-born philosopher Thomas Davidson. In the essay, James states that Davidson was "essentially a teacher." What is interesting when one looks at Davidson's life and work is that, for Davidson, teaching does seem to be an essential feature of what it means to be a philosopher. Here, I develop how Davidson construes this linking of philosophy and teaching with a concluding emphasis (...)
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  8. Luke Anderson (1965). The Concept of Truth in the Philosophy of William James. Rome.
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  9. Owen Anderson (2005). William James and a Science of Religions. Review of Metaphysics 59 (2):443-444.
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  10. Spencer Anderson (2000). William James and "Vicious Intellectualism" in Psychology. Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 20 (1):61-75.
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  11. James Rowland Angell (1908). Book Review: Pragmatism: A New Name for Some Old Ways of Thinking. William James. [REVIEW] Ethics 18 (2):226-.
    An early review of William James' Pragmatism, which views pragmatism as primarily methodological.
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  12. Guy Axtell (2003). Review of Rosenbaum. [REVIEW] Contemporary Pragmatism:178-187.
    There are many books on the market about religion in American thought and history, but the idea for a collection of essays focused directly upon pragmatist reconstructions of religious belief and sentiment is overdue. Stuart Rosenbaum’s reader admirably fills this need, and is bound to bring fresh insights to students and advanced researchers alike.
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  13. Guy Axtell (2001). Teaching James's “The Will to Believe”. Teaching Philosophy 24 (4):325-345.
    Many readers have viewed William James's "The Will to Believe" as his most distinctive and resonating lecture. Yet for all the scholarly attention it has received, the complexities of the "pragmatic defence," and the issues it raises concerning evidential and pragmatic reasoning are still often misunderstood. In this paper I explicate a neglected "core" argument tied closely to James's thesis statement, and provide charts and other tools useful in presenting James' lecture in the philosophy classroom. This argument, based on the (...)
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  14. A. J. Ayer (1968). The Origins of Pragmatism: Studies in the Philosophy of Charles Sanders Peirce and William James. San Francisco, Freeman, Cooper.
  15. R. J. B. (1968). Introduction to William James. Review of Metaphysics 21 (3):560-560.
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  16. R. J. B. (1968). The Writings of William James. Review of Metaphysics 22 (1):162-162.
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  17. David Baggett (2001). Brown, Hunter. William James on Radical Empiricism and Religion. Review of Metaphysics 54 (4):906-908.
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  18. David Baggett (2000). On a Reductionist Analysis of William James's Philosophy of Religion. Journal of Religious Ethics 28 (3):423 - 448.
    William James undertook to steer his way between a rationalistic system that was not empirical enough and an empirical system so materialistic that it could not account for the value commitments on which it rested. In arguing against both the absolutists (gnostics) and the empiricists (agnostics), he defined a position of pluralistic moralism that seemed equally distant from both, leaving himself vulnerable to the criticism that he had rescued morality from scientism only by reducing religion to morals. Such criticism, however, (...)
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  19. Andrew R. Bailey, Review: James, Brown and “the Will to Believe”. [REVIEW]
    First of all, I just want to say that in my opinion this is an interesting and thought-provoking book, and a badly needed corrective to certain mistaken assumptions about James. I find myself very much in sympathy with many of its main points. Some of the things I have to say in the following may— or perhaps may not—be thought to disagree with some of what Professor Brown has argued in his book. If that is so, it should be taken (...)
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  20. Andrew R. Bailey (1999). Beyond the Fringe: William James on the Transitive Parts of the Stream of Consciousness. Journal of Consciousness Studies 6 (2-3):141-53.
    One of the aspects of consciousness deserving of study is what might be called its subjective unity - the way in which, though conscious experience moves from object to object, and can be said to have distinct ‘states', it nevertheless in some sense apparently forms a singular flux divided only by periods of unconsciousness. The work of William James provides a valuable, and rather unique, source of analysis of this feature of consciousness; however, in my opinion, this component of James’ (...)
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  21. Erik C. Banks (2013). Williams James' Direct Realism: A Reconstruction. History of Philosophy Quarterly 30 (3):271-291.
    William James' Radical Empiricist essays offer a unique and powerful argument for direct realism about our perceptions of objects. This theory can be completed with some observations by Kant on the intellectual preconditions for a perceptual judgment. Finally James and Kant deliver a powerful blow to the representational theory of perception and knowledge, which applies quite broadly to theories of representation generally.
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  22. J. M. Barbalet (1999). William James' Theory of Emotions: Filling in the Picture. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 29 (3):251–266.
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  23. Jack Barbalet (2004). Hypothesis, Faith, and Commitment: William James' Critique of Science. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 34 (3):213–230.
    William James is remembered as the philosopher of pragmatism, but he was principally the founder of modern scientific psychology. During the period of his most intense scientific involvement James developed a trenchant critique of science. This was not a rejection of science but an attempt to identify limitations of the contemporary conceptualization of science. In particular, James emphasized the failure of science to understand its basis in human emotions. James developed a scientific theory of emotions in which the importance of (...)
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  24. G. William Barnard (2005). Pt. 3. James and Mysticism. For an Engaged Reading : William James and the Varieties of Postmodern Religious Experience / Grace M. Jantzen ; Asian Religions and Mysticism : The Legacy of William James in the Study of Religions / Richard King ; James and Freud on Mysticism / Robert A. Segal ; Mystical Assessments : Jamesian Reflections on Spiritual Judgments. [REVIEW] In Jeremy R. Carrette (ed.), William James and the Varieties of Religious Experience: A Centenary Celebration. Routledge.
  25. L. A. Barth (1963). American Pragmatism: Peirce, James, and Dewey. Modern Schoolman 40 (4):406-409.
  26. Jacques Barzun (1983/1984). A Stroll with William James. University of Chicago Press.
    With this book, Jacques Barzun pays what he describes as an "intellectual debt" to William James—psychologist, philosopher, and, for Barzun, guide and mentor. Commenting on James's life, thought, and legacy, Barzun leaves us with a wise and civilized distillation of the great thinker's work.
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  27. Pierfrancesco Basile (2011). William James on Ethics and Faith. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 19 (5):1008-1011.
    British Journal for the History of Philosophy, Volume 19, Issue 5, Page 1008-1011, September 2011.
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  28. Maurice Baum (1932). The Attitude of William James Toward Science. The Monist 42 (4):585-604.
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  29. Maurice Baum (1928). A Comparative Study of the Philosophies of William James and John Dewey. Thesis: University of Chicago.
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  30. Hugo Bedau (1968). The Right to Life. The Monist 52 (4):550-572.
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  31. Melissa Bergeron (2006). The Ethics of Belief: Conservative Belief Management. Social Epistemology 20 (1):67 – 78.
    Some hold that W.K. Clifford's arguments are inconsistent, appealing to the disvalue of likely consequences of nonevidential belief-formation, while also insisting that the consequences are irrelevant to the wrongness of so believing. My thesis is that Clifford's arguments are consistent; one simply needs to be clear on the role consequences play in the "Ethics of Belief" (and, for that matter, in William James's "The Will to Believe"). The consequences of particular episodes of nonevidential belief-formation are, as Clifford insists, irrelevant to (...)
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  32. Meurig Beynon (2005). Radical Empiricism, Empirical Modelling and the Nature of Knowing. Pragmatics and Cognition 13 (3):615-646.
    This paper explores connections between Radical Empiricism (RE), a philosophic attitude developed by William James at the beginning of the 20th century, and Empirical Modelling (EM), an approach to computer-based modelling that has been developed by the author and his collaborators over a number of years. It focuses in particular on how both RE and EM promote a perspective on the nature of knowing that is radically different from that typically invoked in contemporary approaches to knowledge representation in computing. This (...)
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  33. Graham Bird (2002). Review: The Divided Self of William James. [REVIEW] Mind 111 (441):100-103.
    This is a review of Richard Gale's 1999 book, The Divided Self of William James (Cambridge U.P.).
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  34. Graham Bird (1996). A Comment on Timothy Sprigge's Account of William James. Bradley Studies 2 (1):64-71.
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  35. Graham Bird (1986). William James. Routledge & Kegan Paul.
    Introduction William James was born in New York on January 1842, the first son of Mary and Henry James. His grandfather, also called William, had amassed a ...
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  36. Julius Seelye Bixler (1926). Religion in the Philosophy of William James. Boston: marshall Jones Company.
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  37. Julius Seelye Bixler (1925). Mysticism and the Philosophy of William James. International Journal of Ethics 36 (1):71-85.
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  38. Richard J. Blackwell (1976). "Four Pragmatists: A Critical Introduction to Peirce, James, Mead, and Dewey," by Israel Scheffler. Modern Schoolman 54 (1):96-96.
  39. Paul Boghossian (2001). The Gospel of Relaxation. The New Republic.
    Pragmatism is America’s distinctive contribution to the history of philosophical thought, though there has always been some dispute about exactly what doctrine it is supposed to name. The philosopher and psychologist William James, in a lecture given at Berkeley in 1898, attributed the view to..
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  40. Daniel Bonevac, William James the Varieties of Religious Experience.
    Here is my copy of William James's The Varieties of Religious Experience . This classic book was first published in 1902, and has remained in print ever since. The basic issues James discusses here remain of vital concern to people in psychology and religion today. I encourage you to go to your local bookstore and buy a copy of this interesting book. (It is in the public domain, and quite reasonably..
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  41. John E. Boodin (1911). From Protagoras to William James. The Monist 21 (1):73-91.
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  42. Francesca Bordogna (2008). William James at the Boundaries: Philosophy, Science, and the Geography of Knowledge. University of Chicago Press.
    At Columbia University in 1906, William James gave a highly confrontational speech to the American Philosophical Association (APA). He ignored the technical philosophical questions the audience had gathered to discuss and instead addressed the topic of human energy. Tramping on the rules of academic decorum, James invoked the work of amateurs, read testimonials on the benefits of yoga and alcohol, and concluded by urging his listeners to take up this psychological and physiological problem. What was the goal of this unusual (...)
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  43. F. H. Bradley (1893). W. James: Immediate Resemblance. Mind 2 (8):510-510.
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  44. Myles Brand (1983). William James's Philosophy. Teaching Philosophy 6 (4):386-388.
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  45. Bernard P. Brennan (1968). William James. New York, Twayne Publishers.
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  46. Bernard P. Brennan (1961). The Ethics of William James. New York, Bookman Associates.
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  47. Jonathan Bricklin & W. James (2005). William James: The Notion of Consciousness --Communication Made (in French) at the 5th International Congress of Psychology, Rome, 30 April (a New Translation by Jonathan Bricklin). [REVIEW] Journal of Consciousness Studies 12 (7):55-64.
    I should like to convey to you some doubts which have occurred to me on the subject of the notion of consciousness that prevails in all our treatises on psychology.
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  48. Steven Ravett Brown (1999). Beyond the Fringe: James, Gurwitsch, and the Conscious Horizon. Journal of Mind and Behavior 20 (2):211-227.
    All our conscious experiences, linguistic and nonlinguistic, are bound up with and dependent on a background that is vague, unexpressed, and sometimes unconscious. The combination of William JamesÕs concept of "fringes" coupled with Aaron GurwitschÕs analysis of the field of consciousness provides a general structure in which to embed phenomenal descriptions, enabling fringe phenomena to be understood, in part, relative to other experiences. I will argue, drawing on examples from Drew LederÕs book, The Absent Body, that specific and detailed phenomena (...)
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  49. Don Browning (1975). William James's Philosophy of the Person: The Concept of the Strenuous Life. Zygon 10 (2):162-174.
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  50. Robert Burch (1979). Truth and Modality in James's “the Dilemma of Determinism”. Southern Journal of Philosophy 17 (4):427-435.
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