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  1. Richard J. Blackwell (1971). "Boston Studies in the Philosophy of Science, Vol. 6: Ernst Mach: Physicist and Philosopher," Ed. R. S. Cohen and R. J. Seeger. [REVIEW] The Modern Schoolman 48 (2):191-192.
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  2. Willem R. de Jong (2001). Bernard Bolzano, Analyticity and the Aristotelian Model of Science. Kant-Studien 92 (3):328-349.
    Quine's well-known ‘Two Dogmas of Empiricism’ (1951) plays a key role in the debate about the analytic-synthetic distinction. Taking to task the ideas of Carnap in particular, Quine shows that logical positivism works with a concept of scientific rationality that is based dogmatically on, among other things, the opposition analytic-synthetic.
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  3. Carlo Ierna (2009). Anton Marty and the Phenomenological Movement. Brentano-Studien 12:219-240.
    In this article we will address the issue whether and in how far Anton Marty had a significant influence on the development of the phenomenological movement. As “the phenomenological movement” is not a clearly defined and circumscribed notion, we need to provide an appropriate context for any comparison. The phenomenological movement grew out of the School of Brentano and we take this larger whole as our starting point. Since Marty did not found his own school or movement, but remained a (...)
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  4. Anita Kasabova (2002). Is Logic a Theoretical or Practical Discipline? Kant and/or Bolzano. Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 84 (3):319-333.
    Does logic describe something or not? If not, is it a normative or practical discipline? Is there a radical division between the practical or normative level and the theoretical or descriptive level? A discipline is theoretical, we may say, if its main propositions contain descriptive expressions, such as “is” or “have”, but no normative expressions, such as “ought”, “ought not” or “may”. A discipline is normative if its main propositions are of the form “it ought to be”. Theoretical propositions express (...)
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  5. Wolfgang Künne (2006). Analyticity and Logical Truth : From Bolzano to Quine. In Markus Textor (ed.), The Austrian Contribution to Analytic Philosophy. Routledge. 1--184.
  6. Benjamin Schnieder (2007). Mere Possibilities: A Bolzanian Approach to Non-Actual Objects. Journal of the History of Philosophy 45 (4):525-550.
    : The paper is a detailed reconstruction of Bernard Bolzano's account of merely possible objects, which is a part of his ontology that has been widely ignored in the literature so far. According to Bolzano, there are some objects which are merely possible. While they are neither denizens of space and time nor members of the causal order, they could have been so. Thus, on Bolzano's view there are, for example, merely possible persons, i.e., objects which are neither actual nor (...)
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  7. Benjamin Schnieder (2006). Particularised Attributes. In M. Textor (ed.), The Austrian Contribution to Analytic Philosophy. Routledge. 1--130.
    For philosophers interested in ontological issues, the writings of the important figures of Austrian philosophy in the nineteenth and early twentieth century contain many buried treasures to rediscover. Bernard Bolzano, Franz Brentano, Alexius Meinong, and Edmund Husserl, to name just four grand names of that period, were highly aware of the importance of a feasible ontology for many of the philosophical questions they addressed throughout their works.
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  8. Barry Smith (1997). The Neurath-Haller Thesis: Austria and the Rise of Scientific Philosophy. In Keith Lehrer & Johann Christian Marek (eds.), Austrian Philosophy Past and Present. Kluwer.
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  9. Markus Textor (ed.) (2006). The Austrian Contribution to Analytic Philosophy. Routledge.
    Although an important part of the origins of analytic philosophy can be traced back to philosophy in Austria in the first part of the twentieth century, remarkably little is known about the specific contribution made by Austrian philosophy and philosophers. In The Austrian Contribution to Analytic Philosophy prominent analytic philosophers take a fresh look at the roots of analytic philosophy in the thought of influential but often overlooked Austrian philosophers, including Brentano, Meinong, Bolzano, Husserl, and Witasek. The contributors to this (...)
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