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  1. Leslie Armour (2002). Religion and the Reflective Self: Coleridge's Platonism Revisited. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 10 (3):467 – 475.
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  2. Margaret Atherton (2003). Mr. Abbott and Professor Fraser: A Nineteenth Century Debate About Berkeleys Theory of Vision. Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 85 (1):21-50.
  3. John Barresi & Raymond Martin (2003). Self-Concern From Priestley to Hazlitt. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 11 (3):499 – 507.
    himself or a proper object of his egoistic self-concern. Hazlitt concluded that belief in personal identity must be an acquired imaginary conception and that since in reality each of us is no more related to his or her future self than to the future self of any other person none of us is 2 ‘.
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  4. M. P. W. Bolton (1866/1993). Inquisitio Philosophica: An Examination of the Principles of Kant and Hamilton. Routledge/Thoemmes Press.
    Facsim of ed. published: London : Chapman and Hall, 1866.
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  5. Thom Brooks (2011). British Idealism. Oxford Bibliographies Online.
    British idealism flourished in the late 19th century and early 20th centuries. It was a movement with a lasting influence on the social and political thought of its time in particular. British idealists helped popularize the work of Immanuel Kant and G. W. F. Hegel in the Anglophone world, but they also sought to use insights from the philosophies of Kant and Hegel to help create a new idealism to address the many pressing issues of the Victorian period in Britain (...)
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  6. Robert E. Butts (1992). William Whewell: Philosopher of Science, And: William Whewell: A Composite Portrait (Review). Journal of the History of Philosophy 30 (4):621-623.
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  7. George Elder Davie (2001). The Scotch Metaphysics: A Century of Enlightenment in Scotland. Routledge.
    Focusing on the works of Reid, Stewart, Sir Hamilton, Brown and Ferrier, this book offers a definitive account of an important philosophical movement, and represents a ground-breaking contribution to scholarship in the area.
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  8. Steffen Ducheyne (2010). Whewell's Tidal Researches: Scientific Practice and Philosophical Methodology. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 41 (1):26-40.
    Primarily between 1833 and 1840, Whewell attempted to accomplish what natural philosophers and scientists since at least Galileo had failed to do: to provide a systematic and broad-ranged study of the tides and to attempt to establish a general scientific theory of tidal phenomena. In the essay at hand, I document the close interaction between Whewell’s philosophy of science (especially his methodological views) and his scientific practice as a tidologist. I claim that the intertwinement between Whewell’s methodology and his tidology (...)
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  9. Jeremy Dunham (2014). Was James Ward a Cambridge Pragmatist? 22 (3):557-581.
    Although the Cambridge Professor of Mental Philosophy and Logic James Ward was once one of Britain's most highly regarded Psychologists and Philosophers, today his work is unjustly neglected. This is because his philosophy is frequently misrepresented as a reactionary anti-naturalistic idealist theism. In this article, I argue, first, that this reading is false, and that by viewing Ward through the lens of pragmatism we obtain a fresh interpretation of his work that highlights the scientific nature of his philosophy and his (...)
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  10. Malcolm Forster, The Whewell-Mill Debate in a Nutshell.
    What is induction? John Stuart Mill (1874, p. 208) defined induction as the operation of discovering and proving general propositions. William Whewell (in Butts, 1989, p. 266) agrees with Mill’s definition as far as it goes. Is Whewell therefore assenting to the standard concept of induction, which talks of inferring a generalization of the form “All As are Bs” from the premise that “All observed As are Bs”? Does Whewell agree, to use Mill’s example, that inferring “All humans are mortal” (...)
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  11. Russell B. Goodman (1990). American Philosophy and the Romantic Tradition. Cambridge University Press.
    Professional philosophers have tended either to shrug off American philosophy as negligible or derivative or to date American philosophy from the work of twentieth century analytical positivists such as Quine. Russell Goodman expands on the revisionist position developed by Stanley Cavell, that the most interesting strain of American thought proceeds not from Puritan theology or from empirical science but from a peculiarly American kind of Romanticism. This insight leads Goodman, through Cavell, back to Emerson and Thoreau and thence to William (...)
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  12. John Haldane (2002). American Philosophy: ‘Scotch’ or ‘Teutonic’? Philosophy 77 (3):311-329.
    Given as an address to the American Philosophical Association on the occasion of its centennial, this paper examines the character and standing of American philosophy now and at the outset of the twentieth century as seen (then and now) from a British point of view. A century ago Britain was itself the unquestioned leader of Anglo-Saxon thought. Now, however, as in so many areas, the US is the pre-eminent world power. This status brings prestige and various benefits but it also (...)
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  13. Ross Harrison (2003). Nineteenth-Century British Philosophers. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 11 (4):715 – 726.
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  14. Gary Hatfield (2013). Psychology, Epistemology, and the Problem of the External World : Russell and Before. In Erich H. Reck (ed.), The Historical Turn in Analytic Philosophy. Palgrave Macmillan.
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  15. Stephen Houlgate (1987). Hegel at Oxford, 1986. The Owl of Minerva 18 (2):225-239.
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  16. Stephen G. Houlgate (1986). Hegel at Oxford, 1985. The Owl of Minerva 18 (1):103-109.
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  17. B. I. (1889). Henry William Chandler. The Classical Review 3 (07):321-322.
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  18. W. J. Mander (ed.) (2014). The Oxford Handbook of British Philosophy in the Nineteenth Century. Oup Oxford.
    This is the first full assessment of British philosophy in the 19th century. Specially written essays by leading experts explore the work of the key thinkers of this remarkable period in intellectual history, covering logic and scientific method, metaphysics, religion, positivism, the impact of Darwin, and ethical, social, and political theory.
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  19. Kris McDaniel, John M. E. Mctaggart. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    This is the Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy comprehensive article on J.M.E. MacTaggart, with special focus on his methodology for philosophy, his metaphysical system, and his ethics.
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  20. Jennifer McRobert (2000). Introduction. In , Philosophical Works of Lady Mary Shepherd, 2 Vols. Thoemmes Press. 21.
    Introductory article in a collection entitled Philosophical Works of Lady Mary Shepherd. Published in 2 volumes. Thoemmes Press, 2000.
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  21. Rudolf Metz (1938). A Hundred Years of British Philosophy. New York, the Macmillan Company.
    GROUPS INTERESTED IN RELIGIOUS PHILOSOPHY 184 General remarks — The Oxford Movement — John Henry Newman — William George Ward — Francis William Newman ...
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  22. Omar W. Nasim (2012). The Spaces of Knowledge: Bertrand Russell, Logical Construction, and the Classification of the Sciences. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 20 (6):1163-1182.
    What Russell regarded to be the ?chief outcome? of his 1914 Lowell Lectures at Harvard can only be fully appreciated, I argue, if one embeds the outcome back into the ?classificatory problem? that many at the time were heavily engaged in. The problem focused on the place and relationships between the newly formed or recently professionalized disciplines such as psychology, Erkenntnistheorie, physics, logic and philosophy. The prime metaphor used in discussions about the classificatory problem by British philosophers was a spatial (...)
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  23. Charles H. Pence, Charles Darwin and Sir John F. W. Herschel: Nineteenth-Century Science and its Methodology.
    In this essay, I review the relationship between Charles Darwin's methodology and the philosophy of science of Sir John F. W. Herschel. Darwin's exposure to Herschel's philosophy was, I argue, significant. Further, when we construct an appropriate reading of Herschel's philosophy of science (a surprisingly difficult feat), we can see that Darwin's three-part argument in the Origin is crafted in order to strictly adhere to Herschel's methodological guidelines.
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  24. Charles H. Pence (2011). Nietzsche’s Aesthetic Critique of Darwin. History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 33 (2):165-190.
    Despite his position as one of the first philosophers to write in the “post- Darwinian” world, the critique of Darwin by Friedrich Nietzsche is often ignored for a host of unsatisfactory reasons. I argue that Nietzsche’s critique of Darwin is important to the study of both Nietzsche’s and Darwin’s impact on philosophy. Further, I show that the central claims of Nietzsche’s critique have been broadly misunderstood. I then present a new reading of Nietzsche’s core criticism of Darwin. An important part (...)
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  25. Charles H. Pence (2011). “Describing Our Whole Experience”: The Statistical Philosophies of W. F. R. Weldon and Karl Pearson. Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 42 (4):475-485.
    There are two motivations commonly ascribed to historical actors for taking up statistics: to reduce complicated data to a mean value (e.g., Quetelet), and to take account of diversity (e.g., Galton). Different motivations will, it is assumed, lead to different methodological decisions in the practice of the statistical sciences. Karl Pearson and W. F. R. Weldon are generally seen as following directly in Galton’s footsteps. I argue for two related theses in light of this standard interpretation, based on a reading (...)
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  26. Ian Proops (2006). Russell’s Reasons for Logicism. Journal of the History of Philosophy 44 (2):267-292.
    What is at stake philosophically for Russell in espousing logicism? I argue that Russell's aims are chiefly epistemological and mathematical in nature. Russell develops logicism in order to give an account of the nature of mathematics and of mathematical knowledge that is compatible with what he takes to be the uncontroversial status of this science as true, certain and exact. I argue for this view against the view of Peter Hylton, according to which Russell uses logicism to defend the unconditional (...)
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  27. Anthony Skelton (2013). Symposium on David Phillips's Sidgwickian Ethics: Introduction. Revue d'Etudes Benthamiennes 12.
    This is a brief introduction to a symposium on David Phillips's Sidgwickian Ethics.
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  28. Robert Stern (2007). Hegel, British Idealism, and the Curious Case of the Concrete Universal. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 15 (1):115 – 153.
    [INTRODUCTION] Like the terms 'dialectic', 'Aufhebung' (or 'sublation'), and 'Geist', the term 'concrete universal' has a distinctively Hegelian ring to it. But unlike these others, it is particularly associated with the British strand in Hegel's reception history, as having been brought to prominence by some of the central British Idealists. It is therefore perhaps inevitable that, as their star has waned, so too has any use of the term, while an appreciation of the problematic that lay behind it has seemingly (...)
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  29. Chris R. Tame, The Libertarian Tradition No 1: Auberon Herbert.
    Some recent hostile responses to the rapid growth of Libertarianism have depicted it as a febrile spin-off from the post-hippy 'Me Decade'. In fact we are the inheritors of an illustrious centuries old tradition, largely overlooked by the myopic current fashions in the history of ideas. Liberals like J. S. Mill and Jeremy Bentham receive plenty of attention in college courses, but the libertarian tradition as a whole is largely ignored, and misrepresented where touched upon. Mill and Bentham constitute one (...)
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  30. James Thomas (2006). Analysis and the Concept: The Bosanquet-Pringle-Pattison Debate. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 14 (4):757 – 764.
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  31. Maria van der Schaar (2013). G.F. Stout and the Psychological Origins of Analytic Philosophy. Palgrave McMillan.
    This book shows that Stout's ideas have played a role in Moore and Russell's development from their early idealism towards analytic realism, where Stout's ideas often find their origin in early phenomenology.
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  32. Rasmus Grønfeldt Winther (2011). Darwin's Pluralism, Then and Now. [REVIEW] Metascience 21 (1):157-161.
    Tom Stoppard’s 1966 play (and 1990 movie) /Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are Dead/ is a metatext – as a text, it interprets, builds upon, and refers to another text, Shakespeare’s Hamlet. Similarly, David N. Reznick’s /The Origin then and now: An interpretative guide to the Origin of Species/ (Princeton UP, 2010) is also a metatext. In this review, I turn to the history of science to evaluate whether Reznick’s book shares three families of virtues with Stoppard’s play: (i) brevity and precision, (...)
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