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  1. Karl Ameriks (2004). On Beiser's German Idealism. Inquiry 47 (1):86 – 98.
  2. Lanier R. Anderson (2005). Neo-Kantianism and the Roots of Anti-Psychologism. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 13 (2):287 – 323.
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  3. Gary Banham (2003). Kant and German Idealisms. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 11 (2):333 – 339.
    This review article responds to a biography of Fichte and a collection of essays on German Idealism stressing the plurality of types of idealism that were presented at the close of the 18th and the beginning of the 19th century.
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  4. Myriam Bienenstock (1992). Rosenzweig's Hegel. The Owl of Minerva 23 (2):177-182.
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  5. Daniel Breazeale (1989). Lange, Nietzsche, and Stack. International Studies in Philosophy 21 (2):91-103.
  6. G. Anthony Bruno (forthcoming). Epistemic Reciprocity in Schelling's Late Return to Kant. In Pablo Muchnik (ed.), Rethinking Kant (volume 4). Cambridge Scholars Publishing.
    In his 1841-2 Berlin lectures, Schelling critiques German idealism’s negative method of regressing from existence to its first principle, which is supposed to be intelligible without remainder. He sees existence as precisely its remainder since there could be nothing that exists. To solve this, Schelling enlists the positive method of progressing from the fact of existence to a proof of this principle’s reality. Since this proof faces the absurdity that there is anything rather than nothing, he concludes that this fact’s (...)
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  7. Paolo Diego Bubbio (2009). Solger's Notion of Sacrifice as Double Negation. Heythrop Journal 50 (2):206-214.
    The aim of the paper is to clarify the theoretical core of Solger's thought, the foundation for his aesthetics. I first analyze Solger's dialectic of double negation. Secondly I focus on Solger's gnoseology, which is orientated toward grasping the equilibrium between the Infinite (God) and the finite (world) consisting in this double negation. Lastly I investigate the notion of sacrifice, connecting it with Solger's ironic dialectic and showing its relevance to a complete understanding of his thought.
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  8. Paola Cantù, Bolzano Versus Kant: Mathematics as a Scientia Universalis. Philosophical Papers Dedicated to Kevin Mulligan.
    The paper discusses some changes in Bolzano's definition of mathematics attested in several quotations from the Beyträge, Wissenschaftslehre and Grössenlehre: is mathematics a theory of forms or a theory of quantities? Several issues that are maintained throughout Bolzano's works are distinguished from others that were accepted in the Beyträge and abandoned in the Grössenlehre. Changes are interpreted as a consequence of the new logical theory of truth introduced in the Wissenschaftslehre, but also as a consequence of the overcome of Kant's (...)
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  9. Ernst Cassirer & Lydia Patton (2005). Hermann Cohen and the Renewal of Kantian Philosophy. Angelaki 10 (1):95-108.
    The three works dedicated to securing the foundation of Kantian doctrine are linked inextricably to Hermann Cohen's philosophical life's work. For as much as Cohen distanced himself from Kant's conclusions on individual points in building his own system, the methodological consciousness that inspired all of Cohen's individual achievements certainly first achieved clarity and maturity in his scientific, comprehensive analysis of Kant's fundamental works.
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  10. Andrew Chignell (2008). On Going Back to Kant. Philosophical Forum 39 (2):109-124.
    A broad overview of the NeoKantian movement in Germany, written as an introduction to a series of essays about that movement. -/- .
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  11. Andrew Chignell & Peter Gilgen (2013). Neo-Kantianism in Contemporary Philosophy. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews.
    A review of a volume on Neo-Kantianism edited by Rudolf Makkreel and Sebastian Luft. -/- .
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  12. Hermann Cohen (2004). Ethics of Maimonides. University of Wisconsin Press.
    Almut Sh. Bruckstein provides the first English translation and her own extensive commentary on this landmark 1908 work, which inspired readings of medieval and ...
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  13. Steven Crowell (1983). Fichte, Marx, and the German Philosophical Tradition. International Philosophical Quarterly 23 (3):338-340.
  14. Herbert De Vriese & Guido Vanheeswijck (2006). Defining a Context for Otto Friedrich Gruppe's 'Revolution' in Nineteenth-Century Philosophy. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 14 (3):489 – 511.
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  15. Scott Edgar, Hermann Cohen's Principle of the Infinitesimal Method and its History: A Rationalist Interpretation.
    This paper defends a Leibnizian rationalist interpretation of Hermann Cohen’s Principle of the Infinitesimal Method and its History (1883). The first half of the paper identifies Cohen’s various different philosophical aims in the PIM. It argues that they are unified by the fact that Cohen’s arguments for addressing those aims all depend on a single shared premise. That linchpin premise is the claim that mathematical natural science can represent individual objects only if it also represents infinitesimal magnitudes. The second half (...)
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  16. Scott Edgar (forthcoming). The Physiology of the Sense Organs and Early Neo-Kantian Conceptions of Objectivity: Helmholtz, Lange, Liebmann. In Flavia Padovani, Alan Richardson & Jonathan Y. Tsou (eds.), Objectivity in Science: Approaches to Historical Epistemology. Boston Studies in Philosophy and History of Science. Springer.
    The physiologist Johannes Müller’s doctrine of specific nerve energies had a decisive influence on neo-Kantian conceptions of the objectivity of knowledge in the 1850s - 1870s. In the first half of the nineteenth century, Müller amassed a body of experimental evidence to support his doctrine, according to which the character of our sensations is determined by the structures of our own sensory nerves, and not by the external objects that cause the sensations. Neo-Kantians such as Hermann von Helmholtz, F.A. Lange, (...)
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  17. Scott Edgar (2013). The Limits of Experience and Explanation: F. A. Lange and Ernst Mach on Things in Themselves. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 21 (1):100-121.
    In the middle of the nineteenth century, advances in experimental psychology and the physiology of the sense organs inspired so-called "Back to Kant" Neo-Kantians to articulate robustly psychologistic visions of Kantian epistemology. But their accounts of the thing in itself were fraught with deep tension: they wanted to conceive of things in themselves as the causes of our sensations, while their own accounts of causal inference ruled that claim out. This paper diagnoses the source of that problem in views of (...)
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  18. Scott Edgar (2010). Hermann Cohen. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
  19. Uljana Feest (forthcoming). The Continuing Relevance of 19th-Century Philosophy of Psychology: Brentano and the Autonomy of Psychological Methods. In C. GalavottiM (ed.), New Directions in the Philosophy of Science, The Philosophy of Science in a European Perspective 5. Springer.
    This paper provides an analysis of Franz Brentano’s thesis that psychology employs a distinctive method, which sets it apart from physiology. The aim of the paper is two-fold: First, I situate Brentano’s thesis (and the broader metaphysical system that underwrites it) within the context of specific debates about the nature and status of psychology, arguing that we regard him as engaging in a form of boundary work. Second, I explore the relevance of Brentano’s considerations to more recent debates about autonomy (...)
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  20. Uljana Feest (2010). “Historical Perspectives on Erklären and Verstehen: Introduction”. In , Historical Perspectives on Erklären and Verstehen.
    The conceptual pair of "Erklären" and "Verstehen" (explanation and understanding) has been an object of philosophical and methodological debates for well over a century. Discussions – to this day – are centered around the question of whether certain objects or issues, such as those dealing with humans or society, require a special approach, different from that of the physical sciences. In the course of such philosophical discussions, we frequently find references to historical predecessors, such as Dilthey’s discussion of the relationship (...)
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  21. Hector Ferreiro (2012). La Teoría Hegeliana de la Imaginación. Estudios Hegelianos 1:16-29.
    In the process of knowledge imagination is, according to Hegel, the point where the human mind dissociates the object into two different contents - i.e. the thing of the external world and the internal content of the mind -, so that both versions of the object must corroborate each other in the way of a synthesis of heterogenous elements that only in their collation recognizes their identity. Comprehension sublates this dualism, and, by doing that, it sublates also the empiricist approach (...)
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  22. Hector Ferreiro (2011). El Lenguaje Como Elemento Inmanente Del Pensar y la Tesis Hegeliana de la Muerte Del Arte. Kalíope 7 (14):108-122.
    The main claim of Hegel´s System is that in its inner structure reality is consubstantial with subjective reason, so that, in spite of all its eventual contradictions, reality can be understood by the human mind. However, the process of knowledge of the rationality of reality is at the same time the process of self-knowledge of the rationality that defines as such the human mind. In this general process of knowledge-self-knowledge, the different artistic forms and the different periods of the History (...)
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  23. Richard Fincham (2005). Refuting Fichte with "Common Sense": Friedrich Immanuel Niethammer's Reception of The. Journal of the History of Philosophy 43 (3):301-324.
  24. Gabriel Finkelstein (2013). Emil du Bois-Reymond: Neuroscience, Self, and Society in Nineteenth-Century Germany. The MIT Press.
    Du Bois-Reymond is the most important forgotten intellectual of the nineteenth century. My biography, now available from the MIT Press, received an Honorable Mention for History of Science, Medicine, and Technology at the 2013 PROSE Awards.
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  25. Erin E. Flynn (2009). Intellectual Intuition in Emerson and the Early German Romantics. Philosophical Forum 40 (3):367-389.
  26. Eckart Förster & Yitzhak Y. Melamed (eds.) (2012). Spinoza and German Idealism. Cambridge University Press.
    Machine generated contents note: 1. Rationality, idealism, monism, and beyond Michael Della Rocca; 2. Kant's idea of the unconditioned and Spinoza's the fourth antinomy and the ideal of pure reason Omri Boehm; 3. The question is whether a purely apparent person is possible Karl Ameriks; 4. Herder and Spinoza Michael Forster; 5. Goethe's Spinozism Eckart Förster; 6. Fichte on freedom: the Spinozistic background Allen Wood; 7. Fichte on the consciousness of Spinoza's God Johannes Haag; 8. Spinoza in Schelling's early conception (...)
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  27. Paul W. Franks (2005). All or Nothing: Systematicity, Transcendental Arguments, and Skepticism in German Idealism. Harvard University Press.
    In this work, the first overview of the German Idealism that is both conceptual and methodological, Paul W. Franks offers a philosophical reconstruction that is...
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  28. Kristin Gjesdal (2006). Hermeneutics and Philology: A Reconsideration of Gadamer's Critique of Schleiermacher. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 14 (1):133 – 156.
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  29. Russell B. Goodman (ed.) (1995). Pragmatism: A Contemporary Reader. Routledge.
    Russell Goodman examines the curious reemergence of pragmatism in a field dominated in the past decades by phenomenology, logic, positivism, and deconstruction. With contributions from major contemporary and classical thinkers such as Cornel West, Richard Rorty, Nancy Fraser, Charles Sanders Peirce, and Ralph Waldo Emerson Russell has gathered an impressive chorus of philosophical voices that reexamine the origins and complexities of neo-pragmatism. The contributors discuss the relationship between pragmatism and literary theory, phenomenology, existentialism, and the work of Ralph Waldo Emerson. (...)
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  30. John Haldane (2002). American Philosophy: ‘Scotch’ or ‘Teutonic’? Philosophy 77 (3):311-329.
    Given as an address to the American Philosophical Association on the occasion of its centennial, this paper examines the character and standing of American philosophy now and at the outset of the twentieth century as seen (then and now) from a British point of view. A century ago Britain was itself the unquestioned leader of Anglo-Saxon thought. Now, however, as in so many areas, the US is the pre-eminent world power. This status brings prestige and various benefits but it also (...)
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  31. Espen Hammer (2003). The Legacy of German Idealism. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 11 (3):521 – 535.
  32. Kevin J. Harrelson (2013). Hegel and the Modern Canon. The Owl of Minerva 44 (1-2):1-35.
    Abstract: This essay traces the relationship between Hegel and some common portrayals of modern philosophy in the nineteenth century. I explain much of the rationale behind the neo-Kantian narrative of modern philosophy, and argue that the common division of modern philosophers into rationalists and empiricists executed a principally anti-Hegelian agenda. I then trace some failed attempts by anglophone philosophers to reconcile Hegel with the neo-Kantian history, in the interest of explaining Hegel’s subsequent unpopularity in England and America. Finally, I argue (...)
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  33. Douglas Hedley (2000). Coleridge, Philosophy, and Religion: Aids to Reflection and the Mirror of the Spirit. Cambridge University Press.
    Coleridge's relation to his German contemporaries constitutes the toughest problem in assessing his standing as a thinker. For the last half-century this relationship has been described, ultimately, as parasitic. As a result, Coleridge's contribution to religious thought has been seen primarily in terms of his poetic genius. This book revives and deepens the evaluation of Coleridge as a philosophical theologian in his own right. Coleridge had a critical and creative relation to, and kinship with, German thought. Moreover, the principal impulse (...)
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  34. Sheridan Hough (1997). Nietzsche's Noontide Friend: The Self as Metaphoric Double. Pennsylvania State University Press.
    A thoroughly original contribution to contemporary thinking on Nietzsche. This is clearly the ripened fruit of a great deal of meditation.
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  35. Wolfgang Huemer & Christoph Landerer (2010). Mathematics, Experience, and Laboratories: Herbart's and Brentano's Role in the Rise of Scientific Psychology. History of the Human Sciences 23 (3):72-94.
    In this article we present and compare two early attempts to establish psychology as an independent scientific discipline that had considerable influence in central Europe: the theories of Johann Friedrich Herbart (1776—1841) and Franz Brentano (1838—1917). While both of them emphasize that psychology ought to be conceived as an empirical science, their conceptions show revealing differences. Herbart starts with metaphysical principles and aims at mathematizing psychology, whereas Brentano rejects all metaphysics and bases his method on a conception of inner perception (...)
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  36. David Hyder (forthcoming). Review of Michael Friedman, Kant’s Construction of Nature. [REVIEW] Isis 105 (2).
    Isis, Vol. 105, No. 2 (June 2014) , pp. 432-434. Opposes Kant and Euler on affine structure to Friedman's 17th c. reading. (Draft will be removed on publication.).
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  37. Carlo Ierna (2008). Concluding Remarks (Abschließende Stellungnahme / Zehnte Diskussionseinheit). Erwägen Wissen Ethik 19 (4):600-602.
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  38. Carlo Ierna (2008). Sigwart's Numbers in Context (Erweiterte Stellungnahme / Zehnte Diskussionseinheit). Erwägen Wissen Ethik 19 (4):585-587.
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  39. M. Inwood (2012). After Herder: Philosophy of Language in the German Tradition, by Michael N. Forster. * German Philosophy of Language: From Hegel to Schlegel and Beyond, by Michael N. Forster. [REVIEW] Mind 121 (481):181-183.
  40. Christopher Jamme (2004). Portraying Myth More Convincingly: Critical Approaches to Myth in the Classical and Romantic Periods. International Journal of Philosophical Studies 12 (1):29 – 45.
    The article examines the treatment of myth by Moritz, Goethe, Hegel and Schelling or the so-called 'Goethezeit'.
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  41. Sven Jürgensen (1997). Hölderlins Trennung von Fichte. Fichte-Studien 12:71-90.
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  42. Michelle Kosch (forthcoming). Fichtean Kantianism in Nineteenth Century Ethics. Journal of the History of Philosophy.
  43. Vanessa Lemm (ed.) (forthcoming). Nietzsche and the Becoming of Life. Fordham.
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  44. Gideon Makin (2009). On Denoting : Appearance and Reality. In Nicholas Griffin & Dale Jacquette (eds.), Russell Vs. Meinong: The Legacy of. Routledge.
    The widely held assumption about what motivated On Denoting is irreconcilable with Russell's position shortly beforehand; but discarding it leaves one with a carefully worked out solution whose problem is missing. The real motivation is to be found in a notoriously obscure passage in OD, in which Russell exposes a decisive (though easily overlooked) flaw in his former theory of denoting; a flaw which also cripples Frege's theory of sense and reference. A comprehensive account of this passage is the chief (...)
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  45. Jacqueline Mariña (2010). Schleiermacher, Realism, and Epistemic Modesty: A Reply to My Critics. In Brent Sockness & Wilhelm Gräb (eds.), Schleiermacher, the Study of Religion, and the Future of Theology. de Gruyter.
    This paper explores two themes—Schleiermacher’s realism and his perspectivalism—and their significance for a theory of religion. I show that Schleiermacher's theory offers an account of human subjectivity and epistemological modesty that at the same time allows us to affirm the reality of the Absolute.
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  46. Jacqueline Mariña (2008). Transformation of the Self in the Thought of Schleiermacher. OUP Oxford.
    Often referred to as the father of modern theology, F.D.E. Schleiermacher occasioned a revolution in theology having a decisive impact on all subsequent theology. In this original study, Jacqueline Mariña argues that Schleiermachers philosophical ethics constitutes a completely original project, and is arguably his most important achievement. -/- Mariña examines Schleiermachers claim that the self relates to the whence of all that is through the ground of self-consciousness, and shows how this understanding allowed him to develop a philosophical system integrally (...)
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  47. Jacqueline Mariña (ed.) (2005). The Cambridge Companion to Friedrich Schleiermacher. Cambridge University Press.
    Known as the 'Father of modern theology' Friedrich Schleiermacher is without a doubt one of the most important theologians in the history of Christianity. Not only relevant to theology, he also made significant contributions in areas of philosophy such as hermeneutics, ethics, philosophy of religion, and the study of Plato, and he was ahead of his time in espousing a kind of pro to-feminism. Divided into three parts, this Companion deals first with elements of Schleiermacher's philosophy, such as metaphysics, epistemology (...)
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  48. Jacqueline Mariña (2005). Christology and Anthropology in Friedrich Schleiermacher. In , The Cambridge Companion to Friedrich Schleiermacher.
    In my chapter "Christology and Anthropology in Friedrich Schleiermacher,” I discuss Schleiermacher's understanding of both the person and work of Christ. Schleiermacher's dialogue with the orthodox Christological tradition preceding him, as well as his understanding of the work of Christ, is founded on a critical analysis of the fundamental person-forming experience of being in relation to Christ and the community founded by him. I provide an analysis of Schleiermacher's discussion of the difficulties surrounding the use of the word "nature" in (...)
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  49. Bruce Matthews (2007). The Grounding of Positive Philosophy: The Berlin Lectures. SUNY.
    The first English translation of Schelling’s final “existential system.”.
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  50. Yitzhak Y. Melamed (2004). Salomon Maimon and the Rise of Spinozism in German Idealism. Journal of the History of Philosophy 42 (1):67-96.
    : In this paper I explore one issue in the history of German Idealism which has been widely neglected in the existing literature. I argue that Salomon Maimon was the first to suggest that Spinoza's pantheism was a radical religious (or 'acosmistic') view rather than atheism. Following a discussion of the historical context of Maimon's engagement with Spinoza, I point out the main Spinozistic element of Maimon 's philosophy: the view of God as the material cause of the world, or (...)
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