This category needs an editor. We encourage you to help if you are qualified.
Volunteer, or read more about what this involves.
Related categories
Siblings:
144 found
Search inside:
(import / add options)   Order:
1 — 50 / 144
  1. L. A. De (1963). O VI Encontro Internacional de Cultura Europeia: Bolzano, 28 de Agosto-2de Setembro. Revista Portuguesa de Filosofia 19 (2):188-189.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  2. Francine Abeles (2007). Lewis Carroll's Visual Logic. History and Philosophy of Logic 28 (1):1-17.
    John Venn and Charles L. Dodgson (Lewis Carroll) created systems of logic diagrams capable of representing classes (sets) and their relations in the form of propositions. Each is a proof method for syllogisms, and Carroll's is a sound and complete system. For a large number of sets, Carroll diagrams are easier to draw because of their self-similarity and algorithmic construction. This regularity makes it easier to locate and thereby to erase cells corresponding with classes destroyed by the premises of an (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  3. Francine Abeles (2005). Lewis Carroll's Formal Logic. History and Philosophy of Logic 26 (1):33-46.
    Charles L. Dodgson's reputation as a significant figure in nineteenth-century logic was firmly established when the philosopher and historian of philosophy William Warren Bartley, III published Dodgson's ?lost? book of logic, Part II of Symbolic Logic, in 1977. Bartley's commentary and annotations confirm that Dodgson was a superb technical innovator. In this paper, I closely examine Dodgson's methods and their evolution in the two parts of Symbolic Logic to clarify and justify Bartley's claims. Then, using more recent publications and unpublished (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  4. A. Abian (1972). Kategoryczność Przeliczalnych Bezatomowych Pierścieni Boole'a. Studia Logica 30 (1):68-68.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  5. Tuomo Aho (1998). Frege and His Groups. History and Philosophy of Logic 19 (3):137-151.
    Frege's docent's dissertation Rechnungsmethoden, die sich auf eine Erweiterung des Grössenbegriffes gründen(1874) contains indications of a bold attempt to extend arithmetic. According to it, arithmetic means the science of magnitude, and magnitude must be understood structurally without intuitive support. The main thing is insight into the formal structure of the operation of ?addition?. It turns out that a general ?magnitude domain? coincides with a (commutative) group. This is an interesting connection with simultaneous developments in abstract algebra. As his main application, (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  6. Ken Akiba (1996). Logic as Instrument: The Millian View on the Role of Logic. History and Philosophy of Logic 17 (1-2):73-83.
    I interpret Mill?s view on logic as the instrumentalist view that logical inferences, complex statements, and logical operators are not necessary for reasoning itself, but are useful only for our remembering and communicating the results of the reasoning. To defend this view, I first show that we can transform all the complex statements in the language of classical first-order logic into what I call material inference rules and reduce logical inferences to inferences which involve only atomic statements and the material (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  7. Chiara Ambrosio (2009). La Teoria Delle Relazioni Nell'algebra Della Logica Schroderiana. History and Philosophy of Logic 30 (2):193-194.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  8. Irving H. Anellis (2011). Peirce's Truth-Functional Analysis and the Origin of the Truth Table. History and Philosophy of Logic 33 (1):87 - 97.
    We explore the technical details and historical evolution of Charles Peirce's articulation of a truth table in 1893, against the background of his investigation into the truth-functional analysis of propositions involving implication. In 1997, John Shosky discovered, on the verso of a page of the typed transcript of Bertrand Russell's 1912 lecture on ?The Philosophy of Logical Atomism? truth table matrices. The matrix for negation is Russell's, alongside of which is the matrix for material implication in the hand of Ludwig (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  9. Irving H. Anellis (1992). Theology Against Logic: The Origins of Logic in Old Russia. History and Philosophy of Logic 13 (1):15-42.
    We consider the history of logic in pre-Petrine. Petrine. and immediate post-Pctrine Russia (from the 15th to the mid-18th centuries) and especially of the Petrine era from the late 17th to early 18th century. Throughout much of this time, the clergy evinced strong hostility towards logic. Nevertheless, a small number of academics and clerics such as Stefan Iavorskii and Fcofan Prokopovich kept Aristotelian logic alive during this period and provided the foundation for its development in the modern era.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  10. Ignacio Angelelli (1967). On Identity and Interchangeability in Leibniz and Frege. Notre Dame Journal of Formal Logic 8 (1-2):94-100.
  11. Ignacio Angelelli & Terrell Ward Bynum (1966). Note on Frege's Begriffsschrift. Notre Dame Journal of Formal Logic 7 (4):369-370.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  12. Marco Antonio Ruffino (1991). Context Principle, Fruitfulness of Logic and the Cognitive Value of Arithmetic in Frege. History and Philosophy of Logic 12 (2):185-194.
    I try to reconstruct how Frege thought to reconcile the cognitive value of arithmetic with its analytical nature. There is evidence in Frege's texts that the epistemological formulation of the context principle plays a decisive role; it provides a way of obtaining concepts which are truly fruitful and whose contents cannot be grasped beforehand. Taking the definitions presented in the Begriffsschrift,I shall illustrate how this schema is intended to work.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  13. Michael Astroh, Ivor Grattan-Guinness & Stephen Read (2001). A Survey of the Life of Hugh MacColl (1837-1909). History and Philosophy of Logic 22 (2):81-98.
    The Scottish logician Hugh MacColl is well known for his innovative contributions to modal and nonclassical logics. However, until now little biographical information has been available about his academic and cultural background, his personal and professional situation, and his position in the scientific community of the Victorian era. The present article reports on a number of recent findings.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  14. Steve Awodey & Erich H. Reck (2002). Completeness and Categoricity. Part I: Nineteenth-Century Axiomatics to Twentieth-Century Metalogic. History and Philosophy of Logic 23 (1):1-30.
    This paper is the first in a two-part series in which we discuss several notions of completeness for systems of mathematical axioms, with special focus on their interrelations and historical origins in the development of the axiomatic method. We argue that, both from historical and logical points of view, higher-order logic is an appropriate framework for considering such notions, and we consider some open questions in higher-order axiomatics. In addition, we indicate how one can fruitfully extend the usual set-theoretic semantics (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   5 citations  
  15. T. Spencer Baynes (1850/1971). An Essay on the New Analytic of Logical Forms. New York,B. Franklin.
    NEW ANALYTIC OF LOGICAL FORMS. THE main principle on which the new Analytic of Logical Forms proceeds is that of a thorough-going quantification of ...
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  16. J. Berg (1987). Is Russell's Antinomy Derivable in Bolzano's Logic? In Bolzano-Studien. Philosophia Naturalis 24 (4):406-413.
  17. K. Berka (1998). Bolzano's" Theory of Science Proper". Filosoficky Casopis 46 (6):931-947.
  18. K. Berka (1976). Contemporary State of Research on Bolzano. Filosoficky Casopis 24 (5):705-720.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  19. Alessandro Bertinetto (2007). Die transzendentale Argumentation in der Transzendentalen Logik Fichtes. Fichte-Studien 31:255-265.
  20. Alessandro Bertinetto (2003). Die Grundbeziehung von »Leben« und »Sehen« in der ersten Transzendentalen Logik Fichtes. Fichte-Studien 20:203-213.
    Remove from this list  
    Translate
      Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  21. Evert W. Beth (1947). The Evolution of Ideas l'Évolution Des Idées Zur Ideengeschichte Hundred Years of Symbolic Logic a Retrospect on the Occasion of the Boole de Morgan Centenary. Dialectica 1 (4):331-346.
    SummaryThe germs of future development, contained in Aristotle's logical works, are indicated, and their influence on the later evolution of logic is explained.The history of symbolic logic since Boole's Mathematical analysis and De Morgan's Formal logic, both of which were published in 1847, is divided into four approximately subsequent phases, viz.:1. algebra of logic; this phase is characterized by Boole's work;2. logical foundation of mathematics; this phase is characterized by Frege's, Peano's and Russell's work, by the discovery of the antonomies (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  22. Arianna Betti (2005). Propositions Et États de Choses Chez Twardowski. Dialogue 44 (3):469-492.
    Sur le contenu et l’objet des représentations (1894) de Kazimierz Twardowski est un des textes les plus influents de la tradition autrichienne. Le manuscrit Logik (1894-1895) complète ce dernier et nous permet entre autres de reconstruire la théorie du jugement de Twardowski. Ces textes soulèvent plusieurs questions, en particulier si Twardowski acceptait les notions de propositions et d’etats de choses, et si sa théorie est acceptable. Cet article presente la théorie de Twardowski, montre qu’il acceptait les états de choses, qu’il (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  23. Arianna Betti & Maria van der Schaar (2004). The Road From Vienna to Lvov: Twardowski's Theory of Judgement Between 1894 and 1897. Grazer Philosophische Studien 67 (1):1-20.
    In several manuscripts, written between 1894 and 1897, Twardowski developed a new theory of judgement with two types of judgement: existential and relational judgements. In Zur Lehre he tried to stay within a Brentanian framework, although he introduced the distinction between content and object in the theory of judgement. The introduction of this distinction forced Twardowski to revise further Brentano'stheory.His changes concerned judgements about relations and about non-present objects. The latter are considered special cases of relational judgements. The existential judgements (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  24. George Boole (1916). George Boole's Collected Logical Works. Open Court.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  25. George Boole, I. Grattan-Guinness & Gérard Bornet (1997). George Boole Selected Manuscripts on Logic and its Philosophy. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  26. George Boole & Philip Edward B. Jourdain (1916). George Boole's Collected Logical Works [Ed. By P.E.B. Jourdain]. The Laws of Thought.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  27. Terry Boswell (1995). A Note on John Venn as a Collector and Bibliographer of Works on Logic. History and Philosophy of Logic 16 (1):121-125.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  28. C. D. Broad (1917). BOOLE, G. - Collected Logical Works; Vol. II. Laws of Thought: Ed. P. E. B. Jourdain. [REVIEW] Mind 26:81.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  29. Stanley N. Burris & H. P. Sankappanavar (2013). The Horn Theory of Boole's Partial Algebras. Bulletin of Symbolic Logic 19 (1):97-105.
    This paper augments Hailperin's substantial efforts to place Boole's algebra of logic on a solid footing. Namely Horn sentences are used to give a modern formulation of the principle that Boole adopted in 1854 as the foundation for his algebra of logic—we call this principle The Rule of 0 and 1.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  30. Paola Cantù, Bolzano Versus Kant: Mathematics as a Scientia Universalis. Philosophical Papers Dedicated to Kevin Mulligan.
    The paper discusses some changes in Bolzano's definition of mathematics attested in several quotations from the Beyträge, Wissenschaftslehre and Grössenlehre: is mathematics a theory of forms or a theory of quantities? Several issues that are maintained throughout Bolzano's works are distinguished from others that were accepted in the Beyträge and abandoned in the Grössenlehre. Changes are interpreted as a consequence of the new logical theory of truth introduced in the Wissenschaftslehre, but also as a consequence of the overcome of Kant's (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  31. Walter Carnielli (2007). Polynomizing: Logic Inference in Polynomial Format and the Legacy of Boole. In L. Magnani & P. Li (eds.), Model-Based Reasoning in Science, Technology, and Medicine. Springer 349--364.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  32. Dermot Cassidy (2007). Russell's Divine Ancestors. History and Philosophy of Logic 28 (2):123-132.
    Russell alleged that the version of the cosmological argument he debated with Copleston involved type confusions, but the definitions of plural descriptive functions and the ancestral in Principia Mathematica can be used to reformulate the argument in a type-safe way via a notion of causally self-sufficient classes. Although the argument depends on the assumption that the class of contingent things is not causally self-sufficient, if that assumption is weakened to say only that it may not be so, then a new (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  33. Stefania Centrone (2012). Strict Evidence and the Prohibition of Metabais Eis Allo Genos An Investigation of Bernard Bolzano's Contributions to a View Based in the Representation of Mathematics. History and Philosophy of Logic 33 (1).
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  34. Stefania Centrone (2012). The Problem of Apagogic Evidence in Bolzano's Contributions and His Science Teaching. History and Philosophy of Logic 33 (2).
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  35. Nino B. Cocciharella (1992). Cantor's Power-Set Theorem Versus Frege's Double-Correlation Thesis. History and Philosophy of Logic 13 (2):179-201.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  36. John Corcoran (2014). Review of Macbeth, D. Diagrammatic Reasoning in Frege's Begriffsschrift. Synthese 186 (2012), No. 1, 289–314. Mathematical Reviews MR 2935338. MATHEMATICAL REVIEWS 2014:2935338.
    A Mathematical Review by John Corcoran, SUNY/Buffalo -/- Macbeth, Danielle Diagrammatic reasoning in Frege's Begriffsschrift. Synthese 186 (2012), no. 1, 289–314. ABSTRACT This review begins with two quotations from the paper: its abstract and the first paragraph of the conclusion. The point of the quotations is to make clear by the “give-them-enough-rope” strategy how murky, incompetent, and badly written the paper is. I know I am asking a lot, but I have to ask you to read the quoted passages—aloud if (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  37. John Corcoran (2007). PSYCHOLOGISM. In John Lachs and Robert Talisse (ed.), American Philosophy: an Encyclopedia. ROUTLEDGE 628-9.
    Corcoran, J. 2007. Psychologism. American Philosophy: an Encyclopedia. Eds. John Lachs and Robert Talisse. New York: Routledge. Pages 628-9. -/- Psychologism with respect to a given branch of knowledge, in the broadest neutral sense, is the view that the branch is ultimately reducible to, or at least is essentially dependent on, psychology. The parallel with logicism is incomplete. Logicism with respect to a given branch of knowledge is the view that the branch is ultimately reducible to logic. Every branch of (...)
    19th Century Logic in 19th Century Philosophy
    History of Logic in Logic and Philosophy of Logic
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  38. John Corcoran (2006). George Boole. In Encyclopedia of Philosophy. 2nd edition. Macmillan
    2006. George Boole. Encyclopedia of Philosophy. 2nd edition. Detroit: Macmillan Reference USA. -/- George Boole (1815-1864), whose name lives among modern computer-related sciences in Boolean Algebra, Boolean Logic, Boolean Operations, and the like, is one of the most celebrated logicians of all time. Ironically, his actual writings often go unread and his actual contributions to logic are virtually unknown—despite the fact that he was one of the clearest writers in the field. Working with various students including Susan Wood and Sriram (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  39. John Corcoran (2003). Aristotle's Prior Analytics and Boole's Laws of Thought. History and Philosophy of Logic. 24 (4):261-288.
    Prior Analytics by the Greek philosopher Aristotle (384 – 322 BCE) and Laws of Thought by the English mathematician George Boole (1815 – 1864) are the two most important surviving original logical works from before the advent of modern logic. This article has a single goal: to compare Aristotle’s system with the system that Boole constructed over twenty-two centuries later intending to extend and perfect what Aristotle had started. This comparison merits an article itself. Accordingly, this article does not discuss (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  40. John Corcoran & Stewart Shapiro (1978). What is Mathematical Logic? Philosophia 8 (1):79-94.
    This review concludes that if the authors know what mathematical logic is they have not shared their knowledge with the readers. This highly praised book is replete with errors and incoherency.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  41. John Corcoran & Susan Wood (1980). Boole's Criteria for Validity and Invalidity. Notre Dame Journal of Formal Logic 21 (4):609-638.
    It is one thing for a given proposition to follow or to not follow from a given set of propositions and it is quite another thing for it to be shown either that the given proposition follows or that it does not follow.* Using a formal deduction to show that a conclusion follows and using a countermodel to show that a conclusion does not follow are both traditional practices recognized by Aristotle and used down through the history of logic. These (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   5 citations  
  42. Karin de Boer (2010). Hegel's Account of Contradiction in the Science of Logic Reconsidered. Journal of the History of Philosophy 48 (3):345-373.
    Hegel's Philosophy is notorious for its alleged claim that all things are contradictory. Whereas Marxists took this claim to support their view that the social-political world exhibits "real" contradictions, non-Hegelian philosophers of various breeds have used it to argue that Hegelian dialectic annihilates the very principle of scientific reasoning.1 Yet, even if it is granted that Hegel did not intend to violate the law of non-contradiction, the stakes of Hegel's account of contradiction in the Science of Logic are far from (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  43. Oliver Deiser (2011). On the Development of the Notion of a Cardinal Number. History and Philosophy of Logic 31 (2):123-143.
    We discuss the concept of a cardinal number and its history, focussing on Cantor's work and its reception. J'ay fait icy peu pres comme Euclide, qui ne pouvant pas bien >faire< entendre absolument ce que c'est que raison prise dans le sens des Geometres, definit bien ce que c'est que memes raisons. (Leibniz) 1.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  44. James Van Evra (2000). The Development of Logic as Reflected in the Fate of the Syllogism 1600–1900. History and Philosophy of Logic 21 (2):115-134.
    One way to determine the quality and pace of change in a science as it undergoes a major transition is to follow some feature of it which remains relatively stable throughout the process. Following the chosen item as it goes through reinterpretation permits conclusions to be drawn about the nature and scope of the broader change in question. In what follows, this device is applied to the change which took place in logic in the mid-nineteenth century. The feature chosen as (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  45. Fernando Ferreira & Kai F. Wehmeier (2002). On the Consistency of the Δ11-CA Fragment of Frege's Grundgesetze. Journal of Philosophical Logic 31 (4):301-311.
    It is well known that Frege's system in the Grundgesetze der Arithmetik is formally inconsistent. Frege's instantiation rule for the second-order universal quantifier makes his system, except for minor differences, full (i.e., with unrestricted comprehension) second-order logic, augmented by an abstraction operator that abides to Frege's basic law V. A few years ago, Richard Heck proved the consistency of the fragment of Frege's theory obtained by restricting the comprehension schema to predicative formulae. He further conjectured that the more encompassing Δ₁¹-comprehension (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  46. J. Ferreiros (1996). Traditional Logic and the Early History of Sets, 1854-1908. Archive for History of Exact Sciences 50:5-71.
    Remove from this list  
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  47. Gottlob Frege, P. T. Geach & Max Black (1951). On Concept and Object. Mind 60 (238):168-180.
  48. J. Gasser (ed.) (2000). A Boole Anthology. Recent and Classical Studies in the Logic of George Boole. Kluwer.
    This collection is the first anthology of works on Boole.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  49. David Godden (2014). Mill's System of Logic. In W. J. Mander (ed.), Oxford handbook of British philosophy in the nineteenth century. Oxford University Press 44-70.
    This chapter situates Mill’s System of Logic (1843/1872) in the context of some of the meta-logical themes and disputes characteristic of the 19th century as well as Mill’s empiricism. Particularly, by placing the Logic in relation to Whately’s (1827) Elements of Logic and Mill’s response to the “great paradox” of the informativeness of syllogistic reasoning, the chapter explores the development of Mill’s views on the foundation, function, and the relation between ratiocination and induction. It provides a survey of the Mill-Whewell (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  50. David Godden (2005). Psychologism in the Logic of John Stuart Mill: Mill on the Subject Matter and Foundations of Ratiocinative Logic. History and Philosophy of Logic 26 (2):115-143.
    This paper considers the question of whether Mill's account of the nature and justificatory foundations of deductive logic is psychologistic. Logical psychologism asserts the dependency of logic on psychology. Frequently, this dependency arises as a result of a metaphysical thesis asserting the psychological nature of the subject matter of logic. A study of Mill's System of Logic and his Examination reveals that Mill held an equivocal view of the subject matter of logic, sometimes treating it as a set of psychological (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
1 — 50 / 144