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19th Century Philosophy

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  1. added 2014-07-27
    Rebecca Bamford (forthcoming). Mood and Aphorism in Nietzsche’s Campaign Against Morality. Pli: The Warwick Journal of Philosophy.
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  2. added 2014-07-23
    Scott Edgar (forthcoming). The Physiology of the Sense Organs and Early Neo-Kantian Conceptions of Objectivity: Helmholtz, Lange, Liebmann. In Flavia Padovani, Alan Richardson & Jonathan Y. Tsou (eds.), Objectivity in Science: Approaches to Historical Epistemology. Boston Studies in Philosophy and History of Science. Springer.
    The physiologist Johannes Müller’s doctrine of specific nerve energies had a decisive influence on neo-Kantian conceptions of the objectivity of knowledge in the 1850s - 1870s. In the first half of the nineteenth century, Müller amassed a body of experimental evidence to support his doctrine, according to which the character of our sensations is determined by the structures of our own sensory nerves, and not by the external objects that cause the sensations. Neo-Kantians such as Hermann von Helmholtz, F.A. Lange, (...)
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  3. added 2014-07-19
    Robert Lane (2011). The Final Incapacity: Peirce on Intuition and the Continuity of Mind and Matter, Part II. Cognitio 12 (2):237-256.
    This is the second of two papers that examine Charles Peirce’s denial that human beings have a faculty of intuition. In the first paper, I argued that in its metaphysical aspect, Peirce’s denial of intuition amounts to the doctrine that there is no determinate boundary between the internal world of the cognizing subject and the external world that the subject cognizes.In the present paper, I argue that, properly understood, the “objective idealism” of Peirce’s 1890s cosmological series is a more general (...)
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  4. added 2014-07-19
    Marco Solinas (2002). Socrate e Freud. Due psicoterapie a confronto, in "Kykéion. Semestrale di idee in discussione", 8 (2002), pp. 105-116. Kykéion. Semestrale di Idee in Discussione 8:105-116.
  5. added 2014-07-18
    Robert Lane (2014). Peircean Semiotic Indeterminacy and Its Relevance for Biosemiotics. In Vinicius Romanini (ed.), Peirce and Biosemiotics.
    This chapter presents a detailed explanation of Peirce’s early and late views on semiotic indeterminacy and then considers how those views might be applied within biosemiotics. Peirce distinguished two different forms of semiotic indeterminacy: generality and vagueness. He defined each in terms of the “right” that indeterminate signs extend, either to their interpreters in the case of generality or to their utterers in the case of vagueness, to further determine their meaning. On Peirce’s view, no sign is absolutely determinate, i.e., (...)
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  6. added 2014-07-17
    Robert Lane (2011). The Final Incapacity: Peirce on Intuition and the Continuity of Mind and Matter, Part I. Cognitio 12 (1).
    This is the first of two papers that examine Charles Peirce’s denial that human beings have a faculty of intuition. The semiotic and epistemo-logical aspects of that denial are well-known. My focus is on its neglected metaphysical aspect, which I argue amounts to the doctrine that there is no determinate boundary between the internal world of the cognizing subject and the external world that the subject cognizes. In the second paper, I will argue that the “objective idealism” of Peirce’s 1890s (...)
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  7. added 2014-07-13
    Joseph Swenson (2014). Sublimation and Affirmation in Nietzsche's Psychology. Journal of Nietzsche Studies 45 (2):196-209.
    Nietzsche informs his readers frequently and seemingly with great confidence that his most original contributions to philosophy are best understood in the context of his development of a radically new kind of psychology. In his most enthusiastic moments, he even suggests that the originality of his thinking reveals not just a very, very good psychologist at work in his writing but also something more like the invention or inauguration of the field of psychology itself. It is this inaugural sense of (...)
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  8. added 2014-07-08
    Jeremy Dunham (forthcoming). Was James Ward a Cambridge Pragmatist? British Journal for the History of Philosophy.
    Although the Cambridge Professor of Mental Philosophy and Logic James Ward was once one of Britain’s most highly regarded Psychologists and Philosophers, today his work is unjustly neglected. This is because his philosophy is frequently misrepresented as a reactionary anti-naturalistic idealist theism. In this article, I argue, first, that this reading is false, and that by viewing Ward through the lens of pragmatism we obtain a fresh interpretation of his work that highlights the scientific nature of his philosophy and his (...)
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  9. added 2014-07-07
    Roderick Chisholm (1986). Brentano on Preference, Desire and Intrinsic Value. In W. Grassl & B. Smith (eds.), Austrian Economics: Historical and Philoosphical Background. Helm Croom. 182-195.
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  10. added 2014-06-25
    Gabriel Finkelstein (2013). Emil du Bois-Reymond: Neuroscience, Self, and Society in Nineteenth-Century Germany. The MIT Press.
    Du Bois-Reymond is the most important forgotten intellectual of the nineteenth century. My biography, now available from the MIT Press, received an Honorable Mention for History of Science, Medicine, and Technology at the 2013 PROSE Awards.
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  11. added 2014-06-20
    Carlo Ierna (2014). La Science de la Conscience Selon Brentano. In C.-E. Niveleau (ed.), Vers une philosophie scientifique. Le programme de Brentano. Demopolis.
    Franz Brentano’s 1874 Psychology from an Empirical Standpoint presents us with a framework and methodology for performing scientific research in psychology. Moreover, this project provides the foundation for the more ambitious ideal of the renewal of philosophy as a science, which had been Brentano’s aim ever since defending his habilitation thesis that “the true method of philosophy is none other than that of the natural sciences”. Brentano therefore needs to carefully articulate the precise position and role of his scientific psychology (...)
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  12. added 2014-06-20
    Mauro Antonelli (2012). Franz Brentano’s Intentionality Thesis. In A. Salice (ed.), Intentionality: Historical and Systematic Perspectives. Philosophia Verlag.
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  13. added 2014-06-20
    Carlo Ierna (2011). Brentano and Mathematics. Revue Roumaine de Philosophie 55 (1):149-167.
    Franz Brentano is not usually associated with mathematics. Generally, only Brentano’s discussion of the continuum and his critique of the mathematical accounts of it is treated in the literature. It is this detailed critique which suggests that Brentano had more than a superficial familiarity with mathematics. Indeed, considering the authors and works quoted in his lectures, Brentano appears well-informed and quite interested in the mathematical research of his time. I specifically address his lectures here as there is much less to (...)
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  14. added 2014-06-20
    Carlo Ierna (2009). Husserl et Stumpf sur la Gestalt et la fusion. Philosophiques 36 (2):489-510.
    In the second edition of the Logische Untersuchungen Husserl claims to have investigated higher order objects and Gestalt qualities before anyone else in the School of Brentano. Indeed, in the Philosophie der Arithmetik we find a discussion of figural moments and fusion that could lend some support to such a claim. By considering the concepts of Gestalt and Verschmelzung in their relevant historical context, the latter especially in connection to Stumpf, we find that Husserl indeed gave a quite original and (...)
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  15. added 2014-06-15
    Ulrika Carlsson (2014). Kierkegaard's Phenomenology of Spirit. European Journal of Philosophy 22 (2).
    Kierkegaard's preoccupation with a separation between the ‘inner’ and the ‘outer’ runs through his work and is widely thought to belong to his rejection of Hegel's idealist monism. Focusing on The Concept of Irony and Either/Or, I argue that although Kierkegaard believes in various metaphysical distinctions between inside and outside (the inwardness of faith and the outwardness of ethics and language; the inwardness of emotion and the outwardness of behavior), he nonetheless understands the task of the philosopher as that of (...)
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  16. added 2014-06-13
    Judith Green (2014). Jamesian Reasonable Belief and Deweyan Religious Communities: Reconstructing Philosophy Pragmatically with Philip Kitcher. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 50 (1):69-96,.
    Philip Kitcher brings his own inclusive and liberatory purposes to bear in Preludes to Pragmatism: Toward a Reconstruction of Philosophy, including in several chapters in which he criticizes William James’s defense of religious belief in “The Will to Believe” and Varieties of Religious Experience, while affirming John Dewey’s emphasis on a “religious” orientation toward community and nature in A Common Faith. These chapters in Kitcher’swide-ranging and beautifully written book contain many insights and imaginative proposals for advancing a “post-religion”secular humanism that (...)
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  17. added 2014-06-13
    Devin Fitzpatrick (2014). Realism and Receptivity: The Role of the Transcendent in Pragmatism. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 50 (1):9-17,.
    Pragmatism is suspicious of transcendence. Perhaps the term “transcendence” is itself suspect, in having a long history and being difficult to clarify. But for the sake of a fresh beginning, I would like to loosely and naïvely define transcendence as what is “beyond,” what in some way exceeds or is external to a significant limit. A fundamental form of transcendence is that of being beyond meaning, that is, existence which precedes or extends beyond the interpretation of questioning beings. Western thought (...)
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  18. added 2014-06-13
    Review by: Helmut Pape (2014). Review: Peirce: A Guide for the Perplexed By Cornelis de Waal. [REVIEW] Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 50 (1):162-166,.
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  19. added 2014-06-13
    S. Joshua Thomas (2014). Beyond the Hall of Mirrors: Naturalistic Ethics Out of Doors. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 50 (1):48-68,.
    Over the course of a decade or so, Philip Kitcher has gradually come to embrace classical pragmatism, particularly John Dewey’s iteration of it, hailing it in his latest volume, Preludes to Pragmatism: Towards a Reconstruction of Philosophy, as “not only America’s most important contribution to philosophy, but also one of the most significant developments in the history of the subject, comparable in its potential for intellectual change to the celebrated turning points in the seventeenth century and in the wake of (...)
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  20. added 2014-06-13
    Philip Kitcher (2014). Extending the Pragmatist Tradition: Replies to Commentators. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 50 (1):97-114,.
    I want to begin by thanking Judith Green for organizing this symposium, and all the contributors for their thoughtful attention to my work.Pragmatism is currently undergoing an apparent revival, with a number of philosophers not normally associated with the movement claiming to have joined the club: following the lead of Dick Rorty, Isaac Levi, and Hilary Putnam, Robert Brandom and Huw Price have also declared their pragmatist allegiance. I, too, have signed on. But, as Seth Joshua Thomas astutely notes in (...)
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  21. added 2014-06-13
    Review by: David W. Rodick (2014). Review: Time, Will, and Purpose: Living Ideas From the Philosophy of Josiah Royce By Randall E. Auxier. [REVIEW] Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 50 (1):166-170,.
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  22. added 2014-06-13
    Judith Green (2014). Introduction: A Collaborative Critical Conversation on Philip Kitcher's Preludes to Pragmatism. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 50 (1):1-8,.
    On April 26, 2013, Philip Kitcher met with a line-up of six critics at the New York Pragmatist Forum to learn what they thought about his latest large book, Preludes to Pragmatism: Toward a Reconstruction in Philosophy (Oxford University Press, 2012). The following contributions, as well as Kitcher’s reply, originated in this meeting, with each author taking into account Kitcher’s initial responses while further developing his or her arguments.As S. Joshua Thomas notes below, our purpose as critics has been two-fold: (...)
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  23. added 2014-06-13
    Kamili Posey (2014). On Classical Pragmatist Foundations in Naturalized Epistemology. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 50 (1):18-28,.
    The naturalized epistemologist’s appeals to classical pragmatist epistemology often take one of the following forms: (1) as providing the historical-foundational theses of current day naturalism, (2) as providing the methodological thesis that links our best methods of (scientific) inquiry with an account of knowledge-acquisition that rejects idealized accounts of truth, (3) as providing an account of why we ought to reject idealized accounts of truth, or (4) as providing a justification for what Putnam (2002) refers to as the “collapse of (...)
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  24. added 2014-06-13
    Mark Tschaepe (2014). Guessing and Abduction. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 50 (1):115-138,.
    “Scientific research faces up with an open and unknown world”Within the work of C. S. Peirce, the most fundamental and contentious form of inference is that of abduction. According to Peirce, abduction is the only type of inference from which new ideas are created (CP 5.171, 1903). He wrote, “every single item of scientific theory which stands established today has been due to Abduction” (CP 5.172, 1903). Similarly, “All that makes knowledge applicable comes to us viâ abduction. […] Not the (...)
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  25. added 2014-06-13
    Jacoby Adeshei Carter (2014). Does “Race” Have a Future or Should the Future Have “Races”? Reconstruction or Eliminativism in a Pragmatist Philosophy of Race. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 50 (1):29-47,.
    In Preludes to Pragmatism: Toward A Reconstruction of Philosophy, Phillip Kitcher argues in Chapter 6, “Does ‘Race’ Have a Future” that developments in evolutionary biology may support a separation of our species into subcategories that could be regarded as races. The human species, he argues, could possibly be divided, using a similar methodology to that employed by evolutionary biologists, into relatively stable and isolated breeding populations that bear distinctive and salient clusters of significant genotypic and phenotypic traits. Hence, the eliminativist (...)
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  26. added 2014-06-13
    Aaron Massecar (2014). Peirce, Moral Cognitivism, and the Development of Character. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 50 (1):139-161,.
    Some Peirceans have defended a form of moral cognitivism according to which “moral judgments fall within the scope of truth, knowledge, and inquiry.”1 The idea is that our moral beliefs can be either true or false and this can be discovered through inquiry. There have been more than a few thinkers who have placed Charles S. Peirce within this camp and have said that his theories of truth and inquiry provide us with a framework within which we can understand moral (...)
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  27. added 2014-06-13
    Review by: Shannon Sullivan (2014). Review: Awakening to Race: Individualism and Social Consciousness in America By Jack Turner. [REVIEW] Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 50 (1):170-173,.
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  28. added 2014-06-13
    Richard Schacht (2013). Nietzsche's Genealogy. In Ken Gemes & John Richardson (eds.), Oxford Handbook of Nietzsche. Oxford University Press. 363-387.
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  29. added 2014-06-03
    Christoph Schuringa (forthcoming). Nietzsche's Genealogical Histories and His Project of Revaluation. History of Philosophy Quarterly 31 (3).
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  30. added 2014-06-03
    David Hyder (forthcoming). Review of Michael Friedman, Kant’s Construction of Nature. [REVIEW] Isis 105 (2).
  31. added 2014-06-01
    Martijn Boven (2014). Kierkegaard's Concepts: Incognito. In Steven M. Emmanuel, Jon Stewart & William McDonald (eds.), Volume 15, Tome III: Kierkegaard's Concepts: Envy to Incognito. Ashgate. 231-236.
    The concept 'incognito' is derived from the Latin incognitus (in-, prefix that expresses negation or privation + cognit-us, past participle of cognōscĕre to get to know). Its lexical meaning in Danish is: appearing in disguise; acting under an unfamiliar, assumed name (or title) to avoid identification. The concept is mentioned in several of Kierkegaard’s works, but only becomes a subject of reflection in two: Concluding Unscientific Postscript to Philosophical Fragments by Johannes Climacus and Practice in Christianity by Anti-Climacus. Both pseudonyms (...)
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  32. added 2014-06-01
    Martijn Boven (2013). De herhaling van het onherhaalbare: Constantin Constantius over vrijheid en subjectiviteit (Søren Kierkegaard on Repetition). Wijsgerig Perspectief 53 (2):30-36.
    Is de herhaling mogelijk? Deze ogenschijnlijk simpele vraag vormt het uitgangspunt van De herhaling. Een proeve van experimenterende psychologie door Constantin Constantius (1843), een van de meest curieuze geschriften uit het oeuvre van Søren Kierkegaard. In dit artikel worden twee aspecten aan de orde gesteld die De herhaling tot een nog altijd belangrijk boek maken: 1) De ongewone filosofische stijl die in dit boek ontwikkeld wordt en 2) De eigenzinnige opvatting over vrijheid en subjectiviteit die er onder de noemer ‘de (...)
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  33. added 2014-05-30
    Catherine Legg, Idealism Operationalized: How Pragmatism Can Help Explicate and Motivate the Possibly Surprising Idea of Reality as Representational.
  34. added 2014-05-30
    Catherine Legg (forthcoming). “Things Unreasonably Compulsory”: A Peircean Challenge to a Humean Theory of Perception, Particularly With Respect to Perceiving Necessary Truths. Cognitio.
    Much mainstream analytic epistemology is built around a sceptical treatment of modality which descends from Hume. The roots of this scepticism are argued to lie in Hume’s (nominalist) theory of perception, which is excavated, studied and compared with the very different (realist) theory of perception developed by Peirce. It is argued that Peirce’s theory not only enables a considerably more nuanced and effective epistemology, it also (unlike Hume’s theory) does justice to what happens when we appreciate a proof in mathematics.
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  35. added 2014-05-28
    Dalia Nassar (2014). Romantic Empiricism After the ‘End of Nature’: Contributions to Environmental Philosophy. In , The Relevance of Romanticism: Essays on German Romantic Philosophy. Oxford University Press.
    Since Bill McKibben’s 1989 book, The End of Nature, it has become commonplace to pronounce the ‘end’ of that which, for many decades, we called nature. Although in many instances the reiterations of the end of nature do not agree with McKibben’s reasoning, they concur that nature is not a plausible or desirable concept for environmental thought or activism. Alongside this growing trend in environmental philosophy, a number of studies have recently appeared which reconsider the environmental significance of romanticism. While (...)
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  36. added 2014-05-28
    Dalia Nassar (2013). Intellectual Intuition and the Philosophy of Nature: An Examination of the Problem. In Johannes Haag & Markus Wild (eds.), Übergänge - diskrusiv oder intuitiv. Essays zu Eckart Försters Die 25 Jahre der Philosophie. Klostermann.
    This paper considers one of the most controversial aspects of Friedrich Schelling’s philosophy, his notion of intellectual intuition and its place within his philosophy of nature. I argue that Schelling developed his account of intellectual intuition through an encounter with--and ultimate critique of--Spinoza’s third kind of knowledge. Thus, Schelling’s notion of intuition was not an appropriation of Fichte’s conception of intuition as an act of consciousness. Nonetheless, and in spite of his sympathy with Spinoza, Schelling contended that intellectual intuition must (...)
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  37. added 2014-05-28
    Dalia Nassar (2012). Spinoza in Schelling’s Early Conception of Intellectual Intuition. In Eckart Förster & Yitzhak Melamed (eds.), Spinoza and German Idealism. Cambridge University Press.
    In this paper, I consider Schelling’s early understanding of intellectual intuition. I argue that although the common interpretation of intellectual intuition traces it back to Fichte’s enumerations in the First Introduction to the Wissenschaftslehre of 1797, an examination of the early Schelling reveals that he was employing the term well before Fichte (already in 1795) and in a way that is decisively distinct from Fichte. Thus, I disagree with well-known Schelling scholars, including Xavier Tilliette, who regard the early Schelling as (...)
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  38. added 2014-05-28
    Dalia Nassar (2011). Idealism is Nothing but Genuine Empiricism: Novalis, Goethe and the Ideal of Romantic Science. Goethe Yearbook 18 (1).
    This article appeared in a special issue of the Goethe Yearbook, on Goethe and German Idealism. In it, I consider Novalis' unparalleled admiration for Goethe's scientific writings in contrast to his rather lukewarm reception of Goethe's poetry. I argue that Novalis' ideal of a “romantic encyclopedia” in which all the arts and sciences are understood in their relations to one another (as opposed to in isolation, like Diderot and D'Alemberts' project) is inspired by Goethe's practice as a scientist. I develop (...)
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  39. added 2014-05-28
    Dalia Nassar (2011). Schelling und die Frühromantik: Das Unendliche und das Endliche im Kunstwerk. In Mildred Galland- Szymkowiak (ed.), Das Problem der Endlichkeit in der Philosophie Schellings. Le problème de la finitude dans la philosophie de Schelling. Lit.
    The article argues that a close examination of the development of Schelling’s thought reveals that, already in the 1800 System of Transcendental Idealism, Schelling had abandoned his earlier understanding of the relationship between the infinite and finite—as elaborated in his philosophy of nature—and began to articulate a more Platonic understanding of the absolute. It thus challenges the widespread interpretation of Schelling’s development, and contests the commonly accepted views of Schelling’s relationship to romanticism.
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  40. added 2014-05-28
    Dalia Nassar (2011). The Absolute in German Romanticism and Idealism. In Alison Stone (ed.), The Edinburgh Critical History of Philosophy, Volume 5: The Nineteenth Century. Edinburgh University Press.
    This article provides a detailed conceptual and historical analysis of the controversial and often misunderstood notion of the “absolute,” examines the philosophical reasons behind its development, and offers an in-depth account of Schelling and Hegel’s disagreement on its meaning and role. It uniquely examines romantic as well as idealist views of the notion of the absolute, and investigates both its metaphysical and epistemological foundations.
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  41. added 2014-05-28
    Dalia Nassar (2010). Interpreting Novalis’ 'Fichte-Studien'. Deutsche Vierteljahrsschrift für Literaturwissenschaft Und Geistesgeschichte 84 (3):315-341.
    The philosophical reception of German Romanticism, lead by Manfred Frank, has focused on Novalis’ early notes while studying Fichte, titled by the editors of the critical edition, the Fichte-Studien. Frank’s claim that these notes contain the most important philosophical contribution of Romanticism has played an especially influential role in the Anglo-American interpretations of Novalis and of philosophical Romanticism in general. In this paper I contest the coherency of these notes, and argue that a proper interpretation of Novalis must take into (...)
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  42. added 2014-05-27
    Uriah Kriegel (forthcoming). Thought and Thing: Brentano's Reism as Truthmaker Nominalism. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research.
    The ontological theory of the later Franz Brentano is often referred to as ‘reism.’ But what exactly is reism, and how is it related to modern-day nominalism? In this paper, I offer an interpretation of Brentano’s reism as a specific variety of nominalism. This variety, although motivated by distinctly modern concerns about truthmakers, adopts a strategy for providing such truthmakers that is completely foreign to modern nominalism. The strategy rests on proliferation of coincident concrete particulars. For example, ‘Socrates is wise’ (...)
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  43. added 2014-05-26
    Theodore George (2009). What is the Future of the Past? Gadamer and Hegel on the Work of Art in the Age of its Liberation. Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology 40 (1):4-20.
  44. added 2014-05-26
    Theodore George (2004). A Monstrous Absolute: Kant, Schelling, and the Poetic Turn in Philosophy. In Jason Wirth (ed.), Schelling Now. State University of New York Press. 135-146.
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  45. added 2014-05-24
    Paul Giladi (2014). Hegel's Critique of Kant. [REVIEW] Bulletin of the Hegel Society of Great Britain 35:134-36.
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  46. added 2014-05-24
    Paul Giladi (2012). The Cambridge Companion to Hegel and Nineteenth Century Philosophy. [REVIEW] Bulletin of the Hegel Society of Great Britain 33 (2):97-100.
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  47. added 2014-05-23
    Jacob Blumenfeld (2014). The Abolition of Time in Hegel's "Absolute Knowing" (and Its Relevance for Marx). Idealistic Studies 43 (1-2).
    In the history of interpretations of Hegel, how one reads the chapter on ‘Absolute Knowing’ in the Phenomenology of Spirit deter­mines one’s whole perspective. In fact, Marx’s only comments on the Phenomenology concern this final chapter, taking it as the very “secret” of Hegel’s philosophy. But what is the secret hidden within the thicket of this impenetrable prose? My suggestion is that it turns on a very specific meaning of the “abolition of time” that Hegel describes in the very last (...)
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  48. added 2014-05-16
    G. Anthony Bruno (forthcoming). 'As From a State of Death': Schelling's Idealism as Mortalism. Comparative and Continental Philosophy.
    If we understand a philosophical problem as “the collision between a comprehensive view (be it hypothesis or belief) and a particular fact which will not fit into it” (Jonas 2001, 9), we should expect no greater problem for Spinozism and German idealism than the human corpse. That the living die is a problem for a view on which it is a “figment of the human imagination” that the organic and inorganic differ in kind, on which death introduces no qualitative change (...)
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  49. added 2014-05-14
    Denis Fisette (2014). Deux Thèses de Brentano Sur la Conscience. In C.-E. Niveleau (ed.), Vers une philosophie scientifique. Le programme de Brentano. Demopolis.
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  50. added 2014-05-14
    Sabine Plaud (2014). Deux Approches de la Psychologie Empirique : Quel Dialogue Entre Franz Brentano Et Ernst Mach ? In C.-E. Niveleau (ed.), Vers une philosophie scientifique. Le programme de Brentano. Demopolis.
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