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  1. Ammon Allred (2010). How is Philosophy Possible? Blanchot on Secrecy, Ambiguity and the Care for Death. International Journal of Philosophical Studies 18 (2):149-175.
    I examine the contribution that the first part of Maurice Blancot's recit Death Sentence makes to his understanding of the relationship between philosophy and literature. I use a reading of the Kantian, transcendental account of literature in “How is Literature Possible” as the starting point for an analysis of the way in which Blanchot uses secrets in describing J.'s death in Death Sentence, linking secrecy up with the imaginary, ambiguity and dissimulation. The purpose for this refinement is to challenge the (...)
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  2. Gary Banham (2011). The Antimonies of Pure Practical Libertine Reason. Angelaki 15 (1):13-27.
    In this article I revisit the relationship between Immanuel Kant and the Marquis De Sade, following not Jacques Lacan but Pierre Klossowski. In the process I suggest that Sade's work is marred by a series of antinomies that prevent him from stating a pure practical libertine reason and leave his view purely theoretical.
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  3. Steven Churchill & Jack Reynolds (2013). Sartre's Legacy. Acumen.
    Examines Sartre's reception and legacy, both within France and beyond.
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  4. Penelope Deutscher (2000). "Imperfect Discretion": Interventions Into the History of Philosophy by Twentieth-Century French Women Philosophers. Hypatia 15 (2):160-180.
    : How might we locate originality as emerging from within the "discrete" work of commentary? Because many women have engaged with philosophy in forms (including commentary) that preclude their work from being seen as properly "original," this question is a feminist issue. Via the work of selected contemporary French women philosophers, the author shows how commentary can reconfigure the philosophical tradition in innovative ways, as well as in ways that change what counts as philosophical innovation.
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  5. Jennifer Eagan (2002). Book Review: Edited by Penelope Deutscher and Kelly Oliver. Enigmas: Essays on Sarah Kofman. Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 1999. [REVIEW] Hypatia 17 (3):271-273.
  6. Bruno Latour (1993). We Have Never Been Modern. Harvard University Press.
    A summation of the work of one of the most influential and provocative interpreters of science, it aims at saving what is good and valuable in modernity and ...
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  7. Bruno Latour (1990). Postmodern? No, Simply Amodern! Steps Towards an Anthropology of Science. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 21 (1):145-171.
  8. Michèle Le Dœuff (1991). Hipparchia's Choice: An Essay Concerning Women, Philosophy, Etc. Blackwell.
  9. Patricia Marino (2008). Review of Monique Canto-Sperber, Moral Disquiet and Human Life. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2008 (10).
  10. Frederick Scott (1959). Hegel Und Blondel. The Modern Schoolman 36 (4):298-299.
  11. Juan Carlos Vila (ed.) (2004). Charles Péguy. Fundación Emmanuel Mounier.
    Biography of Charles Péguy, french thinker.
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