You are accessing PhilPapers from Open University (UK), an institution that is not subscribed to PhilPapers. Starting on July 1, 2014, we ask institutions that grant philosophy degrees and are based in high-GDP countries to contribute to PhilPapers' maintenance and development through a subscription. See this page for details. Please show your support by contacting your librarian.
Bookmark and Share

Advance Directives

Edited by Ruchika Mishra (Program in Medicine and Human Values, California Pacific Medical Center)
Related categories
Siblings:
94 found
Search inside:
(import / add options)   Sort by:
1 — 50 / 94
  1. A. Akabayashi, M. D. Fetters & T. S. Elwyn (1999). Family Consent, Communication, and Advance Directives for Cancer Disclosure: A Japanese Case and Discussion. Journal of Medical Ethics 25 (4):296-301.
    The dilemma of whether and how to disclose a diagnosis of cancer or of any other terminal illness continues to be a subject of worldwide interest. We present the case of a 62-year-old Japanese woman afflicted with advanced gall bladder cancer who had previously expressed a preference not to be told a diagnosis of cancer. The treating physician revealed the diagnosis to the family first, and then told the patient: "You don't have any cancer yet, but if we don't treat (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Akira Akabayashi, Brian Taylor Slingsby & Ichiro Kai (2003). Perspectives on Advance Directives in Japanese Society: A Population-Based Questionnaire Survey. [REVIEW] BMC Medical Ethics 4 (1):1-9.
    Background In Japan, discussion concerning advance directives (ADs) has been on the rise during the past decade. ADs are one method proposed to facilitate the process of communication among patients, families and health care providers regarding the plan of care of a patient who is no longer capable of communicating. In this paper, we report the results of the first in-depth survey on the general population concerning the preferences and use of ADs in Japan. Method A self-administered questionnaire was sent (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Jacob Appel (2010). When Any Answer Is a Good Answer: A Mandated-Choice Model for Advance Directives. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 19 (03):417-421.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Judith Areen (1991). Advance Directives Under State Law and Judicial Decisions. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 19 (1-2):91-100.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Julie M. Aultman (2010). Ethics of Translation: Molst and Electronic Advance Directives. American Journal of Bioethics 10 (4):30 – 32.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. S. G. Barber (1999). (In)Valid Consent of Advance Directives. Journal of Medical Ethics 25 (6):549-550.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Jeffrey T. Berger (2010). What About Process? Limitations in Advance Directives, Care Planning, and Noncapacitated Decision Making. American Journal of Bioethics 10 (4):33 – 34.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. R. L. Berghmans (1998). Advance Directives for Non-Therapeutic Dementia Research: Some Ethical and Policy Considerations. Journal of Medical Ethics 24 (1):32-37.
    This paper explores the use of advance directives in clinical dementia research. The focus is on advance consent to participation of demented patients in non-therapeutic research involving more than minimal risks and/or burdens. First, morally relevant differences between advance directives for treatment and care, and advance directives for dementia research are discussed. Then attention is paid to the philosophical issue of dementia and personal identity, and the implications for the moral authority of research advance directives. Thirdly, a number of practical (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Ellen W. Bernal (2008). Review of Planning for Uncertainty: Living Wills and Other Advance Directives for You and Your Family , 2nd Edition by David John Doukas, M.D., and William Reichel, M.D. [REVIEW] Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 3 (1):1-3.
    Advance directives are useful ways to express one's wishes about end of life care, but even now most people have not completed one of the documents. David Doukas and William Reichel strongly encourage planning for end of life care. Although Planning for Uncertainty is at times fairly abstract for the general reader, it does provide useful background and practical steps.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Violeta Beširević (2010). End-of-Life Care in the 21st Century: Advance Directives in Universal Rights Discourse. Bioethics 24 (3):105-112.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. D. Blondeau, M. Lavoie, P. Valois, E. W. Keyserlingk, M. Hébert & I. Martineau (2000). The Attitude of Canadian Nurses Towards Advance Directives. Nursing Ethics 7 (5):399-411.
    This article seeks to shed light on the beliefs that influence nurses’ intention of respecting or not respecting an advance directive document, namely a living will or a durable power of attorney. Nurses’ beliefs were measured using a 44-statement questionnaire. The sample was made up of 306 nurses working either in a long-term care centre or in a hospital centre offering general and specialized care in the province of Québec. The results indicate that nurses have a strong intention of complying (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. D. Blondeau, P. Valois, E. W. Keyserlingk, M. Hebert & M. Lavoie (1998). Comparison of Patients' and Health Care Professionals' Attitudes Towards Advance Directives. Journal of Medical Ethics 24 (5):328-335.
    OBJECTIVES: This study was designed to identify and compare the attitudes of patients and health care professionals towards advance directives. Advance directives promote recognition of the patient's autonomy, letting the individual exercise a certain measure of control over life-sustaining care and treatment in the eventuality of becoming incompetent. DESIGN: Attitudes to advance directives were evaluated using a 44-item self-reported questionnaire. It yields an overall score as well as five factor scores: autonomy, beneficence, justice, external norms, and the affective dimension. SETTING: (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Dan W. Brock (1993). A Proposal for the Use of Advance Directives in the Treatment of Incompetent Mentally Ill Persons. Bioethics 7 (2-3):247-256.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Alister Browne & Bill Sullivan (2006). Advance Directives in Canada. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 15 (03):256-260.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Allen Buchanan (1988). Advance Directives and the Personal Identity Problem. Philosophy and Public Affairs 17 (4):277-302.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Vanessa Carbonell (2013). Interactive Capacity, Decisional Capacity, and a Dilemma for Surrogates. AJOB Neuroscience 4 (4):36-37.
  17. Ho Mun Chan (2004). Sharing Death and Dying: Advance Directives, Autonomy and the Family. Bioethics 18 (2):87–103.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Laura Crow (2008). Decision-Making in the Absence of Advance Directives : A Personal Story of Letting Go. In James L. Werth & Dean Blevins (eds.), Decision Making Near the End of Life: Issues, Development, and Future Directions. Brunner-Routledge.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. M. D. David M. Zientek (2005). The Texas Advance Directives Act of 1999: An Exercise in Futility? HEC Forum 17 (4).
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Angus Dawson & Anthony Wrigley (2010). A Dead Proposal: Levi and Green on Advance Directives. American Journal of Bioethics 10 (4):23 – 24.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. David Degrazia (1999). Advance Directives, Dementia, and 'The Someone Else Problem'. Bioethics 13 (5):373-391.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Louis-jacques Bogaert Deogratias Biembe Bikopvano (2010). Reflection on Euthanasia: Western and African Ntomba Perspectives on the Death of a Chief. Developing World Bioethics 10 (1):42-48.
    Largely, the concept of energy or vital force, as first analysed by Placide Tempels in Bantu Philosophy , permeates most African ontology systems, worldviews and life views. The Ntomba Chief is chosen because of his above average vital force. This puts him in the position of intermediary between the Supreme Being, the ancestors, and his subordinates. The waning of his energy is incompatible with his position because his energy is that of his tribe. When installed, he takes an oath that, (...)
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. Evan G. DeRenzo (1996). Book Review: Making Sense of Advance Directives. [REVIEW] Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 24 (2):156-157.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. K. Devolder (2005). Advance Directives to Protect Embryos? Journal of Medical Ethics 31 (9):497-498.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. Peter H. Ditto (2008). What Would Terri Want? : Advance Directive and the Psychological Challenges of Surrogate Decision Making. In James L. Werth & Dean Blevins (eds.), Decision Making Near the End of Life: Issues, Development, and Future Directions. Brunner-Routledge.
  26. G. Don Murphy, Tom Schenkenberg, Jeff S. Hunter & Margaret P. Battin (1997). Advance Directives: A Computer Assisted Approach to Assuring Patients’ Rights and Compliance with PSDA and JCAHO Standards. [REVIEW] HEC Forum 9 (3):247-255.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. David J. Doukas, Toni Antonucci & Daniel W. Gorenflo (1992). A Multigenerational Study on the Correlation of Values and Advance Directives. Ethics and Behavior 2 (1):51 – 59.
    The development of the Values History instrument for use in advance directive decision making has raised the question of the importance of values in eliciting advance directives. This pilot study examines the relationship between the domains of values and advance directives drawn from the Values History in three generation intrafamily triads. Significant correlations between values and advance directives were found primarily within the youngest generation. Results reveal a relatively high familiarity by the participants of the various established forms of advance (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. Annette Dufner (2013). Should the Late Stage Demented Be Punished for Past Crimes? Criminal Law and Philosophy 7 (1):137-150.
    The paper investigates whether it is plausible to hold the late stage demented criminally responsible for past actions. The concern is based on the fact that policy makers in the United States and in Britain are starting to wonder what to do with prison inmates in the later stages of dementia who do not remember their crimes anymore. The problem has to be expected to become more urgent as the population ages and the number of dementia patients increases. This paper (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. Gerald Dworkin (2007). Pt. IV. The End of Life. The Definition of Death / Stuart Youngner ; The Aging Society and the Expansion of Senility: Biotechnological and Treatment Goals / Stephen Post ; Death is a Punch in the Jaw: Life-Extension and its Discontents / Felicia Nimue Ackerman ; Precedent Autonomy, Advance Directives, and End-of-Life Care / John K. Davis ; Physician-Assisted Death: The State of the Debate. [REVIEW] In Bonnie Steinbock (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Bioethics. Oxford University Press.
  30. John D. Engel, Gregory Kane, Deborah L. Jones, Debra Lynn-McHale, Martha Swartz, Paul Durbin & Don Klingen (1997). The Patient Self-Determination Act and Advance Directives: Snapshots of Activities in a Tertiary Health Care Center. [REVIEW] Journal of Medical Humanities 18 (3):193-208.
    This study describes the results of a retrospective review of patients' charts who had an advanced directive (AD) and who were hospitalized in a tertiary, acute care teaching hospital. The purpose of the review was to understand from clinical, sociological, ethical and legal perspectives the nature and utility of ADs. Findings and implications of the review are discussed in terms of: patient demographics; diagnoses; quality of ADs; influence of ADs on clinical decisions; and legal aspects of ADs.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. Robert L. Fine (2001). The Texas Advance Directives Act of 1999: Politics and Reality. [REVIEW] HEC Forum 13 (1):59-81.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. A. Flew (1999). Advance Directives Are the Solution to Dr Campbell's Problem for Voluntary Euthanasia. Journal of Medical Ethics 25 (3):245-246.
    Dr Neil Campbell suggests that when patients suffering extremes of protracted pain ask for help to end their lives, their requests should be discounted as made under compulsion. I contend that the doctors concerned should be referred to and then act upon advance directives made by those patients when of sound and calm mind and afflicted by no such intolerable compulsion.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. Leslie Pickering Francis (1993). Advance Directives for Voluntary Euthanasia: A Volatile Combination? Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 18 (3):297-322.
    Defenders of patient autonomy have successfully supported the legal adoption of advance directives. More recently, some defenders of patient autonomy have also supported the legalization of voluntary active euthanasia. This paper explores the wisdom of combining both practices. If euthanasia were to become legal, should it be permitted by advance directives? The paper juxtaposes the most significant doubts about advance directives, with the most significant doubts about euthanasia. It argues that the doubts together raise more concern about the combined practices (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. Heather J. Gert (1999). The Death Penalty and Victims' Rights: Legal Advance Directives. [REVIEW] Journal of Value Inquiry 33 (4):457-473.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. R. Gillon (1999). Research Into Emergency Treatments--Could the Offer of 'Advance Directives' Help? Journal of Medical Ethics 25 (4):291-292.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. Sara Goering (2007). What Makes Suffering "Unbearable and Hopeless"? Advance Directives, Dementia and Disability. American Journal of Bioethics 7 (4):62-63.
  37. Tolga Guven & Gurkan Sert (2010). Advance Directives in Turkey's Cultural Context: Examining the Potential Benefits for the Implementation of Patient Rights. Bioethics 24 (3):127-133.
    Advance directives are not a part of the healthcare service in Turkey. This may be related with the fact that paternalism is common among the healthcare professionals in the country, and patients are not yet integrated in the decision-making process adequately. However, starting from the enactment of the Regulation of Patient Rights in 1998, this situation started to change. While the paternalist tradition still appears to be strong in Turkey, the Ministry of Health has been taking concrete measures in the (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. Chris Hackler, Ray Moseley & Dorothy E. Vawter (eds.) (1989). Advance Directives in Medicine. Praeger.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. Martin Harvey (2006). Advance Directives and the Severely Demented. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 31 (1):47 – 64.
    Should advance directives (ADs) such as living wills be employed to direct the care of the severely demented? In considering this question, I focus primarily on the claims of Rebecca Dresser who objects in principle to the use of ADs in this context. Dresser has persuasively argued that ADs are both theoretically incoherent and ethically dangerous. She proceeds to advocate a Best Interest Standard as the best way for deciding when and how the demented ought to be treated. I put (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. Miki Hayashi, Chieko Hasui, Fusako Kitamura, Masaaki Murakami, Mika Takeuchi, Hisao Katoh & Toshinori Kitamura (2000). Respecting Autonomy in Difficult Medical Settings: A Questionnaire Study in Japan. Ethics and Behavior 10 (1):51 – 63.
    Some people in Japan are still comfortable with the paternalistic role of doctors, but others wish that their own decisions would receive a greater amount of respect. A total of 747 students of universities and colleges and 114 parents of these students participated in a questionnaire survey. Most of the participants thought that autonomy should be respected in situations involving death with dignity and euthanasia, whereas it should not be respected in attempted suicide and involuntary admission of individuals with mental (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. Elizabeth Heitman & Virginia Gremillion (2001). Ethics Committees Under Texas Law: Effects of the Texas Advance Directives Act. [REVIEW] HEC Forum 13 (1):82-104.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. Cees Hertogh, Marike de Boer, Rose-Marie Dröes & Jan Eefsting (2007). Beyond a Dworkinean View on Autonomy and Advance Directives in Dementia. Response to Open Peer Commentaries on "Would We Rather Lose Our Life Than Lose Our Self? Lessons From the Dutch Debate on Euthanasia for Patients With Dementia". American Journal of Bioethics 7 (4):4-6.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. Susan E. Hickman, Bernard J. Hammes, Alvin H. Moss & Susan W. Tolle (2005). Hope for the Future: Achieving the Original Intent of Advance Directives. Hastings Center Report 35 (6 Supplement):s26-s30.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. Bjørn Hofmann, Anne Myhr & Søren Holm (2013). Scientific Dishonesty—a Nationwide Survey of Doctoral Students in Norway. BMC Medical Ethics 14 (1):1-9.
    BackgroundThe knowledge of scientific dishonesty is scarce and heterogeneous. Therefore this study investigates the experiences with and the attitudes towards various forms of scientific dishonesty among PhD-students at the medical faculties of all Norwegian universities.MethodAnonymous questionnaire distributed to all post graduate students attending introductory PhD-courses at all medical faculties in Norway in 2010/2011. Descriptive statistics.Results189 of 262 questionnaires were returned (72.1%). 65% of the respondents had not, during the last year, heard or read about researchers who committed scientific dishonesty. One (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (17 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. T. Hope (1996). Advance Directives. Journal of Medical Ethics 22 (2):67-68.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. Violeta Be Irević (2010). End-of-Life Care in the 21st Century: Advance Directives in Universal Rights Discourse. Bioethics 24 (3):105-112.
    This article explores universal normative bases that could help to shape a workable legal construct that would facilitate a global use of advance directives. Although I believe that advance directives are of universal character, my primary aim in approaching this issue is to remain realistic. I will make three claims. First, I will argue that the principles of autonomy, dignity and informed consent, embodied in the Oviedo Convention and the UNESCO Declaration on Bioethics and Human Rights, could arguably be regarded (...)
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. Trefor Jenkins, Darrel Moellendorf & Udo Schüklenk (2001). The Distribution of Medical Resources, Withholding Medical Treatment, Drug Trials,Advance Directives, Euthanasia and Other Ethical Issues: The Thandi Case (II). Developing World Bioethics 1 (2):163–174.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. Yvonne Johnson (2009). The Bioethical Underpinnings of Advance Directives. Ethics and Social Welfare 3 (1):32-53.
    Advance directives are instructions on health care. Executed by a mentally competent individual, an advance directive becomes active in the event that the person loses mental capacity to make health care decisions. Many social workers have embraced advance directives on the basis that they promote self-determination at the end of life. However, on closer inspection, undergirding the rationale for advance directives are complex philosophical theories and concepts that include: self-determination; the good death; congruity between the former mentally competent person and (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  49. Marshall B. Kapp (1996). Book Review: Making Sense of Advance Directives. [REVIEW] Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 24 (2):153-155.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  50. Soyoon Kim, Ki-Hyun Hahm, Hyoung Wook Park, Hyun Hee Kang & Myongsei Sohn (2010). A Korean Perspective on Developing a Global Policy for Advance Directives. Bioethics 24 (3):113-117.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
1 — 50 / 94