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  1. M. K. Asante (1998). The African American as African. Diogenes 46 (184):39-50.
  2. P. H. Coetzee (2001). Later Marxist Morality - Its Relevance for Africa's Post-Colonial Situation. Koers: Bulletin for Christian Scholarship 66 (4):621-637.
    Marx’s polemic against exploitation focuses centrally on the idea that capitalism not only betrays the inviolability of the human individual, but also prevents the realization of man’s true nature as “species-being” and the realization of the kind of community appropriate to this nature, thus preventing the freeing of human potential from the structural force of capital. I examine this polemic with reference to the views of African philosophers (Hountondji and others) on Africa’s exposure to neo-colonial exploitation, extracting from it a (...)
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  3. Emmanuel Chukwudi Eze (ed.) (1997). Postcolonial African Philosophy: A Critical Reader. Wiley-Blackwell.
    Postcolonial African Philosophy: A Critical Reader sets out a timely and powerful agenda for contemporary African, Afro-Caribbean, and African American philosophy.
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  4. Lewis R. Gordon (1999). Pan‐Africanism and African‐American Liberation in a Postmodern World: A Review Essay. [REVIEW] Journal of Religious Ethics 27 (2):333-358.
    This review essay explores Josiah Young's project of developing a liberatory Pan-Africanism that is attuned to cultural diversity and Victor Anderson's advocacy of postmodern cultural criticism in African-American religious thought. After situating African-American religious thought as a branch of Africana thought, the author examines these two religious thinkers' work as an effort to forge a position on African-American religious thought--including its relation to theology--in an age where even theory is treated as a god that is about to die. At the (...)
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  5. Lee M. Brown (ed.) (2004). African Philosophy: New and Traditional Perspectives. Oxford University Press Usa.
    In the last two decades the idea of African Philosophy has undergone significant change and scrutiny. Some critics have maintained that the idea of a system of philosophical thought tied to African traditions is incoherent. In African Philosophy Lee Brown has collected new essays by top scholars in the field that in various ways respond to these criticisms and defend the notion of African Philosophy. The essays address both epistemological and metaphysical issues that are specific to the traditional conceptual languages (...)
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  6. Tsenay Serequeberhan (2013). The Hermeneutics of African Philosophy: Horizon and Discourse. Routledge.
    Hermeneutics is a crucial but neglected perspective in African philosophy. Here, Tsenay Serequeberhan engages post-colonial African literature and the ideas of the African liberation struggle with critically-used insights from the European philosophical tradition. Continuing the work of Theophilus Okere and Okonda Okolo, this book attempts to overcome the debate between ethnophilosophy and professional philosophy, demonstrating that the promise of African philosophy lies with the critical development of the African hermeneutical perspective.
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  7. Kwasi Wiredu (ed.) (2008). A Companion to African Philosophy. Wiley-Blackwell.
    This volume of newly commissioned essays provides comprehensive coverage of African philosophy, ranging across disciplines and throughout the ages. _ Offers a distinctive historical treatment of African philosophy. Covers all the main branches of philosophy as addressed in the African tradition. Includes accounts of pre-colonial African philosophy and contemporary political thought. _.
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  8. Kwasi Wiredu (ed.) (2008). A Companion to African Philosophy. Wiley-Blackwell.
    This volume of newly commissioned essays provides comprehensive coverage of African philosophy, ranging across disciplines and throughout the ages. _ Offers a distinctive historical treatment of African philosophy. Covers all the main branches of philosophy as addressed in the African tradition. Includes accounts of pre-colonial African philosophy and contemporary political thought. _.
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  9. Cynthia Young (2001). Havana Up in Harlem: LeRoi Jones, Harold Cruse and the Making of a Cultural Revolution. Science and Society 65 (1):12 - 38.
    During the 1960s the Cuban Revolution was a seminal influence on black Americans. In July 1959, LeRoi Jones (later Amiri Baraka) and Harold Cruse traveled to Cuba, where they witnessed the Rebel Army becoming the new Cuban government. That trip shaped Cruse's and Jones' ideas about the relationship between First World protest and Third World revolution. Jones' participation in the Black Arts Movement and Cruse's ideas in Rebellion or Revolution? and The Crisis of the Negro Intellectual were informed by their (...)
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