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  1. A. Abizadeh (2009). The Radical Hobbes: The Allegiance of Thomas Hobbes, by Jeffrey R. Collins. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press, 2005. 326 Pp. $125.00 (Cloth), $55.00 (Paper). Subverting the Leviathan: Reading Thomas Hobbes as a Radical Democrat, by James Martel. New York: Columbia University Press, 2007. 240 Pp. $34.50 (Cloth). [REVIEW] Political Theory 37 (5):706-712.
  2. John Adams (1954/2003). The Political Writings of John Adams: Representative Selections. Hackett Pub..
    " The consequences of this article for Adams' thought are nowhere better articulated than in this anthology, which presents his remarkable attempts at ...
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  3. Peter R. Anstey (ed.) (2006). John Locke: Critical Assessments of Leading Political Philosophers. Routledge.
    Today, John Locke is recognized as one of the most important and formative philosophical influences on the modern world. His imprint is still felt in political and legal thought, in educational theory, moral theory and in the theory of knowledge. Lockes key works, Two Treatises of Government , and the monumental An Essay Concerning Human Understanding , provoked lively debate when they were first published in 1690 and remain standard texts in undergraduate philosophy courses throughout the English-speaking world and beyond. (...)
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  4. Marcus Arvan (forthcoming). Why Hobbes Cannot Limit the Leviathan: A Critical Commentary on Larry May's Limiting Leviathan. Hobbes Studies.
    This commentary contends that Larry May’s Hobbesian argument for limitations on sovereignty and lawmaking in Limiting Leviathan does not succeed. First, I show that Hobbes begins with a plausible instrumental theory of normativity. Second, I show that Hobbes then attempts, unsuccessfully—by his own lights—to defend a kind of non-instrumental, moral normativity. Thus, I contend, in order to successfully “limit the Leviathan” of the state, the Hobbesian must provide a sound instrumental argument in favor of the sovereign limiting their actions and (...)
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  5. Richard Ashcraft (1978). Ideology and Class in Hobbes' Political Theory. Political Theory 6 (1):27-62.
  6. Deborah Baumgold (2009). UnParadoxical Hobbes: In Reply to Springborg. Political Theory 37 (5):689 - 693.
  7. Ronald Beiner (forthcoming). Civil Religion and Anticlericalism in James Harrington. European Journal of Political Theory:1474885113510124.
    In the last few years, there has been a notable surge of interest in the themes of civil religion and the battle against “priestcraft” among historians of political thought. Examples include Eric Nelson’s The Hebrew Republic; Paul Rahe’s Against Throne and Altar; Jeffrey Collins’s The Allegiance of Thomas Hobbes; Jonathan Israel’s work on the legacy of Spinoza; Justin Champion’s work on John Toland; and my own book, Civil Religion. Within the intellectual space created by this recent scholarship, this article focuses (...)
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  8. Ken Binmore (2006). Why Do People Cooperate? Politics, Philosophy and Economics 5 (1):81-96.
    Can people be relied upon to be nice to each other? Thomas Hobbes famously did not think so, but his view that rational cooperation does not require that people be nice has never been popular. The debate has continued to simmer since Joseph Butler took up the Hobbist gauntlet in 1725. This article defends the modern version of Hobbism derived largely from game theory against a new school of Butlerians who call themselves behavioral economists. It is agreed that the experimental (...)
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  9. Aryeh Botwinick (1983). Hobbes's Concept of Law and Representation: Some Reflections on Past and Future. Journal of Social Philosophy 14 (1):34-51.
  10. M. E. Brint (1988). Echoes of Narcisse. Political Theory 16 (4):617-635.
  11. Mónica Brito Vieira (2009). The Elements of Representation in Hobbes: Aesthetics, Theatre, Law, and Theology in the Construction of Hobbes's Theory of the State. Brill.
  12. Andre Santos Campos (2010). The Individuality of the State in Spinoza's Political Philosophy. Archiv für Geschichte Der Philosophie 92 (1):1-38.
    The place of the State in Spinoza's ontology has emerged in scholarly literature as one of the most complex issues involving Spinoza's political thought. At issue is whether Spinoza's State is an actual individual with its own conatus . Some consider it a completely real individual, others say that its individuality can only be metaphoric, whilst others point out the conceptual insufficiency of this polarity for explaining the ontological status of political aggregates and try to overcome it through new concepts, (...)
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  13. Nicholas Capaldi (1987). Order and Artifice in Hume's Political Philosophy. Journal of the History of Philosophy 25 (4):604-606.
  14. Mario A. Cattaneo (1996). Hobbes and Criminal Procedure Torture and Pre-Trial Detention. Hobbes Studies 9 (1):32-35.
  15. Ruth F. Chadwick (ed.) (1992). Kant's Moral and Political Philosophy. Routledge.
  16. Simone Chambers (2009). “Who Shall Judge?” Hobbes, Locke and Kant on the Construction on Public Reason. Ethics and Global Politics 2 (4).
    This paper investigates early modern and enlightenment roots of contemporary ideas of public reason. I argue that concepts of public reason arose in answer to the question ‘who shall judge?’ The religious and moral pluralism unleashed by the reformation lead first to the weakening of authoritative common forms of reasoning, this in turn and more importantly lead to the question who is the final arbiter when a political community is faced with deep disagreement about political/ moral questions. The rise of (...)
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  17. V. C. Chappell (ed.) (1992). John Locke: Political Philosophy. Garland Pub..
  18. Joshua Cohen (2010). Rousseau: A Free Community of Equals. Oxford University Press.
    This book provides an analytical and critical appraisal of Rousseau's political thought that, while frank about its limits, also explains its enduring power.
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  19. Paul Collins (2005). The Trouble with Tom: The Strange Afterlife and Times of Thomas Paine. Distributed to the Trade by Holtzbrinck Publishers.
    Paul Collins travels the globe piecing together the missing body and soul of one of our most enigmatic founding fathers: Thomas Paine. A typical book about an American founding father doesn’t start at a gay piano bar and end in a sewage ditch. But then, Tom Paine isn’t your typical founding father. A firebrand rebel and a radical on the run, Paine alone claims a key role in the development of three modern democracies. In death, his story turns truly bizarre. (...)
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  20. Auguste Comte (1998). Early Political Writings. Cambridge University Press.
    This edition of the French philosopher Auguste Comte's (1798-1857) early essays shows Comte at the heart of the political and intellectual debates of Restoration France. The young Comte forged the central features of his philosophical system in response to the central challenge of the 1820s - how to find a new foundation for political legitimacy and thus to 'close' the revolutionary era. Stuart Jones's introduction to this new edition shows how Comte grappled with problems that confronted liberals and counter-revolutionaries alike, (...)
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  21. Maurice William Cranston (1986). Philosophers and Pamphleteers: Political Theorists of the Enlightenment. Oxford University Press.
    This volume discusses the ideas of six leading thinkers of the French Enlightenment: Montesquieu, Voltaire, Rousseau, Diderot, Holbach, and Condorcet. A general introduction surveys the political theories of the Enlightenment, setting them in the context of the political realities of 18th-century France. The first book of its kind on the subject, Philosophers and Pamphleteers brings a welcome, new perspective to the study of French political thought during a fascinating historical era.
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  22. Daniel E. Cullen (1993). Freedom in Rousseau's Political Philosophy. Northern Illinois University Press.
  23. Eleanor Curran (2010). Blinded by the Light of Hohfeld: Hobbes's Notion of Liberty. Jurisprudence 1 (1):85-104.
    Recent work in Hobbes scholarship has raised again the subject of Hobbes's notion of liberty. In this paper, I examine Hobbes's use of the notion of liberty, particularly in his theory of rights. I argue that in describing the rights that individuals hold, Hobbes is employing "liberty" to cover more than the famously restrictive definition of the "absence of external impediments" and that this broader understanding of liberty should not be put down to simple inconsistency on Hobbes's part. In the (...)
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  24. Eleanor Curran (2006). Lost in Translation. Some Problems with a Hohfeldian Analysis of Hobbesian Rights. Hobbes Studies 19 (1):58-76.
  25. Eleanor Curran (2002). A Very Peculiar Royalist. Hobbes in the Context of His Political Contemporaries. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 10 (2):167 – 208.
    (2002). A VERY PECULIAR ROYALIST. HOBBES IN THE CONTEXT OF HIS POLITICAL CONTEMPORARIES. British Journal for the History of Philosophy: Vol. 10, No. 2, pp. 167-208. doi: 10.1080/096087800210122455.
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  26. Benedictus de Spinoza (2005). Oeuvres. Presses Universitaires de France.
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  27. Paul R. DeHart (2013). Leviathan Leashed: The Incoherence of Absolute Sovereign Power. Critical Review 25 (1):1-37.
    Early modern theorists linked the idea of sovereign power to a conception of absolute power developed during the medieval period. Ockham had reframed the already extant distinction between God's absolute and ordained powers in order to argue that God was free of moral constraint in ordaining natural law for human beings. Thus, the natural law could command the opposite of what God had ordained if He wished to make it so. Bodin extended Ockham's argument to earthly sovereigns, who do not (...)
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  28. J. F. Dienstag (2009). Review Essays: Man of Peace: Hobbes Between Politics and Science. Political Theory 37 (5):694-705.
  29. Robert Alexander Duff (1903/1970). Spinoza's Political and Ethical Philosophy. New York,A. M. Kelley.
  30. Stewart Duncan (2008). Review of Samantha Frost, Lessons From a Materialist Thinker: Hobbesian Reflections on Ethics and Politics. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2008 (8).
  31. John Dunn (2010). The Significance of Hobbes's Conception of Power. Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 13 (2):417-433.
    Hobbes held distinctive views about the role of power in organizing and directing human life and posing the central problems of politics. His English vocabulary (unlike his Latin vocabulary) conflates conceptions of force, instrumental capacity, right and entitlement in a single term. It remains controversial how far he changed his conception of human nature over the last four decades of his intellectual life from a more to a less egoistic version, and how far, if he did, any such change modified (...)
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  32. Stephen Ellenburg (1976). Rousseau's Political Philosophy: An Interpretation From Within. Cornell University Press.
  33. Elisabeth Ellis (2010). The Received Hobbes. In Ian Shapiro (ed.), Leviathan. Yale University Press. 481-518.
  34. Roberto Evangelista (2010). Il Bagaglio Politico Degli Individui: La "Dinamica Consuetudinaria" Nella Riflessione Politica di Spinoza. Ghibli.
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  35. Alys Eve Weinbaum (2006). Cultivating and Challenging the Common: Lockean Property, Indigenous Traditionalisms, and the Problem of Exclusion. Contemporary Political Theory 5 (2):193-214.
  36. Enrica Fabbri (2009). Roberto Bellarmino E Thomas Hobbes: Teologie Politiche a Confronto. Aracne.
  37. James Farr, Jakob de Roover, Sn Balagangadhara & Léonard C. Feldman (2008). Aspects of Locke. Political Theory 36 (4):495-577.
  38. Colin Farrelly (2002). Review: Kant and Modern Political Philosophy. [REVIEW] Mind 111 (443):662-664.
  39. Am Feallsanach (1998). Locke and Libertarian Property Rights: Reply to Weinberg. Critical Review 12 (3):319-323.
    Abstract In his ?Freedom, Self?Ownership, and Libertarian Philosophical Diaspora, ?Justin Weinberg attempts to show, by using arguments from G.A. Cohen, that philosophical defenses of libertarian natural rights are doomed to failure, because they are either circular (by basing libertarianism on the value of ?freedom") or invalid (by basing libertarianism on a self?ownership premise that actually leads to some form of egalitarianism). In fact, however, a natural?rights libertarianism based on the self?ownership premise is not inconsistent if it holds that the (...)
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  40. Michaele Ferguson (2012). Unsocial Sociability: Perpetual Antagonism in Kant's Political Thought. In Elisabeth Ellis (ed.), Kant's Political Theory: Interpretations and Applications. Pennsylvania State University Press.
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  41. Domenico Fisichella (2008). Alla Ricerca Della Sovranità: Sicurezza E Libertà in Thomas Hobbes. Carocci.
  42. Greg Forster (2004). Review: A Glorious Revolution: Restoring Locke's Relevance. [REVIEW] Political Theory 32 (5):706 - 713.
  43. Richard Fralin (1978). Rousseau and Representation: A Study of the Development of His Concept of Political Institutions. Columbia University Press.
  44. Julian H. Franklin (1996). Allegiance and Jurisdiction in Locke's Doctrine of Tacit Consent. Political Theory 24 (3):407-422.
  45. Michael Freeden (2005). Spinoza and Republicanism. Contemporary Political Theory 4 (4):471.
  46. Jeffrey Friedman (1988). Locke as Politician. Critical Review 2 (2-3):64-101.
    REVOLUTIONARY POLITICS AND LOCKE S TWO TREATISES OF GOVERNMENT by Richard Ashcraft Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1986. 613 pp., $65.00, $15.00 (paper) LOCKE'S TWO TREATISES OF GOVERNMENT by Richard Ashcraft London: Allen & Unwin, 1987. 316 pp., $34.95.
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  47. Samantha Frost (2004). Hobbes Out of Bounds. Political Theory 32 (2):257-273.
  48. Samantha Frost (2004). Review: Hobbes Out of Bounds. [REVIEW] Political Theory 32 (2):257 - 273.
  49. Don Garrett (2010). Promising' Ideas: Hobbes and Contract in Spinoza's Political Philosophy. In Yitzhak Y. Melamed & Michael A. Rosenthal (eds.), Spinoza's 'Theological-Political Treatise': A Critical Guide. Cambridge University Press. 192.
  50. Eugene Garver (2010). Why Can't We All Just Get Along: The Reasonable Vs. The Rational According to Spinoza. Political Theory 38 (6):838 - 858.
    Spinoza presents a picture of the good human life in which being rational and being reasonable or sociable are mutually supporting: the philosopher makes the best citizen, and citizenship is the best route to philosophy and adequate ideas. Crucial to this mutual implication are the roles of religion and politics in promoting obedience. It is through obedience that people can become "of one mind and one body" in the absence of adequate ideas, through the presence of shared empowering imaginations and (...)
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