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Abortion

Edited by Ruchika Mishra (Program in Medicine and Human Values, California Pacific Medical Center)
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  1. Philip Abbott (1978). Philosophers and the Abortion Question. Political Theory 6 (3):313-335.
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  2. Deregulating Abortion (1994). Section A: Abortion. In Alison M. Jaggar (ed.), Living with Contradictions: Controversies in Feminist Social Ethics. Westview Press. 272.
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  3. Jaworska Agnieszka & Tannenbaum Julie (forthcoming). Who Has the Capacity to Participate as a Rearee in a Person-Rearing Relationship. Ethics.
    We discuss applications of our account of moral status grounded in person-rearing relationships: which individuals have higher moral status or not, and why? We cover three classes of cases: (1) cases involving incomplete realization of the capacity to care, including whether infants or fetuses have this incomplete capacity; (2) cases in which higher moral status rests in part on what is required for the being to flourish; (3) hypothetical cases in which cognitive enhancements could, e.g., help dogs achieve human-like cognitive (...)
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  4. Sahin Aksoy (1997). Abortion: The Destruction of Life. Eubios Journal of Asian and International Bioethics 7 (2):53-54.
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  5. Anita L. Allen (2009). 22 Atmospherics: Abortion Law and Philosophy. In Francis J. Mootz (ed.), On Philosophy in American Law. Cambridge University Press. 184.
    In 1934, Karl N. Llewellyn published a lively essay trumpeting the dawn of legal realism, "On Philosophy in American Law." The charm of his defective little piece is its style and audacity. A philosopher might be seduced into reading Llewellyn’s essay by its title; but one soon learns that by "philosophy" Llewellyn only meant "atmosphere". His concerns were the "general approaches" taken by practitioners, who may not even be aware of having general approaches. Llewellyn paired an anemic concept of philosophy (...)
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  6. Robert Almeder & James Humber (eds.) (1996). Biomedical Ethics Reviews: Reproduction, Technology, and Rights.
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  7. Zac Alstin (2011). The Great Australian Abortion Canard: Is Law Reform the End of the Issue? Bioethics Research Notes 23 (2):26.
    Alstin, Zac At a March lecture in Canberra, Australian ethicist and pro-abortion activist Dr Leslie Cannold, spoke about the 'unfinished business' of abortion law reform in Australia. A frustrated friend sent me the transcript of this lecture and asked me to write something in response. But given the context of Cannold's lecture: a pro-abortion speech to a pro-abortion audience about pro-abortion law reform, a direct response seems impertinent. Plus, as a rule of thumb, when you play 'Pin the Tail' on (...)
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  8. Andrew Altman (1980). Abortion and the Indigent. Journal of Social Philosophy 11 (1):5-9.
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  9. P. Alward (2002). Thomson, the Right to Life, and Partial Birth Abortion or Two MULES for Sister Sarah. Journal of Medical Ethics 28 (2):99-101.
    In this paper, I argue that Thomson's famous attempt to reconcile the fetus's putative right to life with robust abortion rights is not tenable. Given her view, whether or not an abortion violates the fetus's right to life depends on the abortion procedure utilised. And I argue that Thomson's view implies that any late term abortion that involves feticide is impermissible. In particular, this would rule out the partial birth abortion technique which has been so controversial of late.
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  10. Peter Alward, Ignorance and Abortion Policy.
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  11. Peter Alward (2007). Ignorance, Indeterminacy, and Abortion Policy. Journal of Value Inquiry 41 (2-4):183-200.
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  12. William L. Andrews (2010). Federally Funded Elective Abortion. International Journal of Applied Philosophy 24 (2):169-184.
    In this paper we will argue in favor of federal funding of elective abortion, more specifically in support of Medicaid funding. To do so, we will address the restrictions on public funding presently in place and demonstrate that the various justifications offered in their defense are in­adequate. We will then suggest that the ‘failure to enable’ represented by a ban on Federal funding is morally equivalent to an outright prohibition on abortion for the target population. Just as a moral equivalence (...)
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  13. David B. Annis (1984). Abortion and the Potentiality Principle. Southern Journal of Philosophy 22 (2):155-163.
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  14. Kiarash Aramesh (2009). A Closer Look at the Abortion Debate in Iran. American Journal of Bioethics 9 (8):57-58.
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  15. Thalia Arawi & Anwar Nassar (2011). Prenatally Diagnosed Foetal Malformations and Termination of Pregnancy: The Case of Lebanon. Developing World Bioethics 11 (1):40-47.
    Termination of pregnancy (TOP) is offered in many countries, for foetuses prenatally diagnosed with congenital malformations that are deemed incompatible with life or that are associated with a high morbidity. In Lebanon, a middle income country where religion plays a focal role, the law prohibits any form of TOP unless it is the only means to save the mother's life. It is the contention of the authors of this article that even if the foetus is a person, if it were (...)
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  16. David Archard, Law and Moral Disagreement : The Case of Abortion.
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  17. Gary M. Atkinson (1974). The Morality of Abortion. International Philosophical Quarterly 14 (3):347-362.
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  18. Robert Audi (1997). Preventing Abortion as a Test Case for the Justifiability of Violence. Journal of Ethics 1 (2):141-163.
    This paper explores the rationale for violence and coercion aimed at preventing abortion conceived as the killing of an innocent person. Some important arguments for personhood at conception are examined, and in the light of the examination the paper considers whether they warrant concluding that a free and democratic society should pass laws recognizing personhood at conception. The wider concern is what principles such a society should use as a basis for legal coercion and what principles conscientious individuals should use (...)
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  19. Erdem Aydin (2000). Changing Abortion Policy in Turkey. HEC Forum 12 (2):177-180.
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  20. Elvio Baccarini, Questions of Life and Death.
    The research started with a definition of the general ethical background to be applied in bioethical discussions, particularly regarding aspects of morality that have to be enforced by the community. Only those moral beliefs that can be accepted by consensus in a free discussion can be enforced. It follows that the basic principle of a well ordered society is the equality (and possible upwards extension) of the basic liberties. Therefore, whenever it is possible to respect the principle of autonomy in (...)
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  21. Ninia Baehr (1994). Deregulating Abortion. In Alison M. Jaggar (ed.), Living with Contradictions: Controversies in Feminist Social Ethics. Westview Press. 272.
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  22. Bernard Baertschi & Alexandre Mauron (2010). Moral Status Revisited: The Challenge of Reversed Potency. Bioethics 24 (2):96-103.
    Moral status is a vexing topic. Linked for so long to the unending debates about ensoulment and the morality of abortion, it has recently resurfaced in the embryonic stem cell controversy. In this new context, it should benefit from new insights originating in recent scientific advances. We believe that the recently observed capability of somatic cells to return to a pluripotential state (a capability we propose to name 'reversed potency') in a controlled manner requires us to modify the traditional concept (...)
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  23. Sherwin Bailey (1966). Abortion: An Ethical Discussion. The Eugenics Review 58 (3):167.
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  24. D. Baird (1975). Induced Abortion: Epidemiological Aspects. Journal of Medical Ethics 1 (3):122-126.
    Sir Dugald Baird sketches the history of abortion legislation in Great Britain from the beginning of the century. In his views the 1967 Abortion Act has been one of the most important and beneficial pieces of social legislation enacted in Britain in the last 100 years. It has, however, brought problems both of administration in the hospitals and to individual doctors and nurses, particularly when the patients are young single women and even schoolgirls. One of the consequences of the Abortion (...)
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  25. Robert M. Baird & Stuart E. Rosenbaum (eds.) (2001). The Ethics of Abortion: Pro-Life Vs. Pro-Choice. Prometheus Books.
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  26. John Baker (1985). Philosophy and the Morality of Abortion. Journal of Applied Philosophy 2 (2):261-270.
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  27. Lynne Rudder Baker (2005). When Does a Person Begin? Social Philosophy and Policy 22 (2):25-48.
    According to the Constitution View of persons, a human person is wholly constituted by (but not identical to) a human organism. This view does justice both to our similarities to other animals and to our uniqueness. As a proponent of the Constitution View, I defend the thesis that the coming-into-existence of a human person is not simply a matter of the coming-into-existence of an organism, even if that organism ultimately comes to constitute a person. Marshalling some support from developmental psychology, (...)
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  28. Angela Ballantyne, Ainsley Newson, Florencia Luna & Richard Ashcroft (2009). Response to Open Peer Commentaries on “Prenatal Diagnosis and Abortion for Congenital Abnormalities: Is It Ethical to Provide One Without the Other?”. American Journal of Bioethics 9 (8):6-7.
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  29. Angela Ballantyne, Ainsley Newson, Florencia Luna & Richard Ashcroft (2009). Prenatal Diagnosis and Abortion for Congenital Abnormalities: Is It Ethical to Provide One Without the Other? American Journal of Bioethics 9 (8):48-56.
    This target article considers the ethical implications of providing prenatal diagnosis (PND) and antenatal screening services to detect fetal abnormalities in jurisdictions that prohibit abortion for these conditions. This unusual health policy context is common in the Latin American region. Congenital conditions are often untreated or under-treated in developing countries due to limited health resources, leading many women/couples to prefer termination of affected pregnancies. Three potential harms derive from the provision of PND in the absence of legal and safe abortion (...)
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  30. Deok Jin Ban, Jinhyun Kim & W. Indralal de Silva (2002). Induced Abortion in Sri Lanka: Who Goes to Providers for Pregnancy Termination? Journal of Biosocial Science 34 (3):303-316.
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  31. Wayne Hall Bang Nguyen Pham, S. Hill Peter & Chalapati Rao, Analysis of Socio-Political and Health Practices Influencing Sex Ratio at Birth in Viet Nam.
    Viet Nam has experienced rapid social change over the last decade, with a remarkable decline in fertility to just below replacement level. The combination of fertility decline, son preference, antenatal sex determination using ultrasound and sex selective abortion are key factors driving increased sex ratios at birth in favour of boys in some Asian countries. Whether or not this is taking place in Viet Nam as well is the subject of heightened debate. In this paper, we analyse the nature and (...)
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  32. Zbigniew Bańkowski, J. Barzelatto & Alexander Morgan Capron (eds.) (1989). Ethics and Human Values in Family Planning: Conference Highlights, Papers, and Discussion: Xxii Cioms Conference, Bangkok, Thailand, 19-24 June 1988. [REVIEW] Cioms.
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  33. R. Barcaro (1997). M. Mori, Aborto e morale. [REVIEW] Epistemologia 20 (2).
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  34. Linda Barclay (1999). Rights, Intrinsic Values and the Politics of Abortion. Utilitas 11 (02):215-.
    In Life's Dominion Ronald Dworkin argues that disagreement over the morality ofabortion is about how best to respect the intrinsic value of human life, rather than about foetal rights as many people mistakenly suppose. Dworkin argues that the state should be neutral indebates about intrinsic value and thus it should be neutral in the abortion debate. Through a consideration of the notion of intrinsic value, it is argued in this article that Dworkin'sargument fails. On the interpretation of which Dworkin seems (...)
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  35. Y. Michael Barilan (2003). One or Two: An Examination of the Recent Case of the Conjoined Twins From Malta. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 28 (1):27 – 44.
    The article questions the assumption that conjoined twins are necessarily two people or persons by employing arguments based on different points of view: non-personal vitalism, the person as a sentient being, the person as an agent, the person as a locus of narrative and valuation, and the person as an embodied mind. Analogies employed from the cases of amputation, multiple personality disorder, abortion, split-brain patients and cloning. The article further questions the assumption that a conjoined twin's natural interest and wish (...)
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  36. Y. Michael Barilan & Moshe Weintraub (2001). Pantagruelism: A Rabelaisian Inspiration for Understanding Poisoning, Euthanasia and Abortion in the Hippocratic Oath and in Contemporary Clinical Practice. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 22 (3):269-286.
    Contrary to the common view, this paper suggests that the Hippocratic oath does not directly refer to the controversial subjects of euthanasia and abortion. We interpret the oath in the context of establishing trust in medicine through departure from Pantagruelism. Pantagruelism is coined after Rabelais' classic novel Gargantua and Pantagruel. His satire about a wonder herb, Pantagruelion, is actually a sophisticated model of anti-medicine in which absence of independent moral values and of properly conducted research fashion a flagrant over-medicalization of (...)
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  37. Larry D. Barnett, The Roots of Law.
    The article rests on the macrosociological thesis that (i) the concepts and doctrines used in law are determined by the properties of society and that (ii) these properties are produced by large-scale forces. The thesis thus maintains that the content of law is not shaped by the persons who serve as legislators, judges, and executive-branch policymakers; such individuals are merely the vehicles by which societal conditions mold law. To illustrate, the article examines shifts in law in the United States on (...)
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  38. Charles H. Baron (1989). Abortion and Legal Process in the United States: An Overview of the Post-Webster Legal Landscape. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 17 (4):368-375.
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  39. Jonathan Baron (1995). Myside Bias in Thinking About Abortion. Thinking and Reasoning 1 (3):221 – 235.
    College-student subjects made notes about the morality of early abortion, as if they were preparing for a class discussion. Analysis of the quality of their arguments suggests that a distinction can be made between arguments based on well-supported warrants and those based on warrants that are easily criticised. The subjects also evaluated notes made by other, hypothetical, students preparing for the same discussion. Most subjects evaluated the set of arguments as better when the arguments were all on one side than (...)
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  40. Robert Laurence Barry (1989). Medical Ethics: Essays on Abortion and Euthanasia. P. Lang.
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  41. Paul Bassen (1982). Present Sakes and Future Prospects: The Status of Early Abortion. Philosophy and Public Affairs 11 (4):314-337.
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  42. Frederick Christian Bauerschmidt (2004). Being Baptized: Bodies and Abortion. In Stanley Hauerwas & Samuel Wells (eds.), The Blackwell Companion to Christian Ethics. Blackwell Pub..
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  43. Etienne-Emile Baulieu (1992). Updating RU 486 Development. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 20 (3):154-156.
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  44. Francis J. Beckwith (2014). Does Judith Jarvis Thomson Really Grant the Pro-Life View of Fetal Personhood in Her Defense of Abortion? International Philosophical Quarterly 54 (4):443-451.
    In her ground-breaking 1971 article, “A Defense of Abortion,” Judith Jarvis Thomson argues that even if one grants to the prolifer her most important premise—that the fetus is a person—the prolifer’s conclusion, the intrinsic wrongness of abortion, does not follow. However, in her 1995 article, “Abortion: Whose Right?,” Thomson employs Rawlsian liberalism to argue that even though the prolifer’s view of fetal personhood is not unreasonable, the prochoice advocate is not unreasonable in rejecting it. Thus, because we should err on (...)
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  45. Francis J. Beckwith (2010). Abortion. Faith and Philosophy 27 (4):478-482.
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  46. Francis J. Beckwith (2006). Defending Abortion Philosophically: A Review of David Boonin's a Defense of Abortion. [REVIEW] Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 31 (2):177 – 203.
    This article is a critical review of David Boonin's book, A Defense of Abortion (Cambridge University Press, 2002), a significant contribution to the literature on this subject and arguably the most important monograph on abortion published in the past twenty years. Boonin's defense of abortion consists almost exclusively of sophisticated critiques of a wide variety of pro-life arguments, including ones that are rarely defended by pro-life advocates. This article offers a brief presentation of the book's contents with extended assessments of (...)
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  47. Sonu Bedi (2011). Why a Criminal Prohibition on Sex Selective Abortions Amounts to a Thought Crime. Criminal Law and Philosophy 5 (3):349-360.
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  48. Christopher Belshaw (1997). Abortion, Value and the Sanctity of Life. Bioethics 11 (2):130–150.
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  49. David Benatar (2006). Better Never to Have Been: The Harm of Coming Into Existence. New York ;Oxford University Press.
    Better Never to Have Been argues for a number of related, highly provocative, views: (1) Coming into existence is always a serious harm. (2) It is always wrong to have children. (3) It is wrong not to abort fetuses at the earlier stages of gestation. (4) It would be better if, as a result of there being no new people, humanity became extinct. These views may sound unbelievable--but anyone who reads Benatar will be obliged to take them seriously.
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  50. Philip W. Bennett (1982). A Defence of Abortion; A Question for Judith Jarvis Thomson. Philosophical Investigations 5 (2):142-145.
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