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  1. Paul Ardenne (2006). Extrême: Esthétiques de la Limites Dépassée. Flammarion.
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  2. D. Cavedon-Taylor (2013). The Aesthetic Mind: Philosophy and Psychology, by Elisabeth Schellekens and Peter Goldie (Eds). Mind 122 (485):319-324.
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  3. David Clowney (2012). Savoring Disgust: The Foul and the Fair in Aesthetics by Korsmeyer, Carolyn. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 70 (2):233-235.
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  4. Rafael De Clercq (2014). The Critical Imagination, by James Grant. [REVIEW] Australasian Journal of Philosophy 92 (1):208-209.
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  5. A. E. Denham (2013). Attuned, Transcendent & Transfigured: Nietzsche's Aesthetic Psychology. In Daniel Came (ed.), Nietzsche on Art & Life. Oxford.
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  6. I͡U. S. Druzhkin (2011). Tekhnika Khudozhestvennogo Transa.
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  7. V. Dura-Vila (2014). Courage in Art Appreciation: A Humean Perspective. British Journal of Aesthetics 54 (1):77-95.
    In this article I argue that a high capacity for courage, in the sense of the strength of character that enables one to face distress, angst or psychological pain, is required of Hume’s ideal critics just as the other well-known five characteristics are. I also explore the implications of my proposal for several aspects of Hume’s aesthetics, including the one brought into relief by Shelley’s interpretation of Hume along the lines of distinguishing between the perceptual and affective stages in aesthetic (...)
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  8. Nigel Fabb (2014). The Verse-Line as a Whole Unit in Working Memory, Ease of Processing, and the Aesthetic Effects of Form. Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 75:29-50.
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  9. J. Gaiger (2011). Participatory Imagining and the Explanation of Living-Presence Response. British Journal of Aesthetics 51 (4):363-381.
    This paper has two aims. First, I seek to show that Kendall Walton's analysis of the participatory character of our imaginative engagement in games of make-believe provides a powerful explanatory framework that can be used to address some of the central problems that still remain unresolved in contemporary accounts of living-presence response, including those put forward by David Freedberg and Alfred Gell. Second, I argue that Walton's focus on the activities of ‘appreciators’ prevents him from considering the possible application of (...)
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  10. K. Gorodeisky (2011). A Tale of Two Faculties. British Journal of Aesthetics 51 (4):415-436.
    The notion of the ‘free harmony of the faculties’ has baffled many of Kant's readers and also attracted much criticism. In this paper I attempt to shed light on this puzzling notion. By doing so, I aim to challenge some of the criticisms that this notion has attracted, and to point to its relevance to contemporary debates in aesthetics. While most of the literature on the free harmony is characterized by what I regard as an ‘extra-aesthetic approach’, I propose ‘an (...)
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  11. Michael Haworth (2014). Genius Is What Happens: Derrida and Kant on Genius, Rule-Following and the Event. British Journal of Aesthetics 54 (3):323-337.
    This essay examines the concept of genius in the work of Jacques Derrida and Immanuel Kant and argues that, despite Derrida’s arguments to the contrary, there is significant space for convergence between the two accounts. This convergence is sought in the complex, paradoxical relationship between the invention of the new and the contextual conditions, or ‘rules’, from which any work of genius must depart but without which no work of genius would be possible. It is my argument that Kant evades (...)
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  12. Norbert Herold (1987). Review: Kaulbach, Kant's Aesthetic Cognition. Philosophy and History 20 (1):19-21.
  13. Arnold Isenberg (1949). Critical Communication. Philosophical Review 58 (4):330-344.
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  14. Amir Konigsberg (2012). The Acquaintance Principle, Aesthetic Autonomy, and Aesthetic Appreciation. British Journal of Aesthetics 52 (2):153-168.
    The acquaintance principle (AP) and the view it expresses have recently been tied to a debate surrounding the possibility of aesthetic testimony, which, plainly put, deals with the question whether aesthetic knowledge can be acquired through testimony—typically aesthetic and non-aesthetic descriptions communicated from person to person. In this context a number of suggestions have been put forward opting for a restricted acceptance of AP. This paper is an attempt to restrict AP even more.
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  15. C. Korsmeyer (2012). Touch and the Experience of the Genuine. British Journal of Aesthetics 52 (4):365-377.
    Genuineness is an important property of objects that are rare, old, or preserved as memorials. Being genuine enhances economic value for objects such as works of art, and it is obviously critical for historical purposes, such as assessing the artefacts from a past culture. Here I argue that genuineness is also an aesthetic property that delivers an experience of its own. I contend that the sense of touch covertly operates in such experiences, as this sense conveys the impression of being (...)
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  16. Rafe Mcgregor (2012). Narrative, Emotion, and Insight Edited by Carroll, Noël and John Gibson. [REVIEW] Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 70 (3):319-321.
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  17. Aaron Meskin, Mark Phelan, Margaret Moore & Matthew Kieran (2013). Mere Exposure to Bad Art. British Journal of Aesthetics 53 (2):139-164.
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  18. D. Moyal-Sharrock (2012). Cora Diamond and the Ethical Imagination. British Journal of Aesthetics 52 (3):223-240.
    In much of her writing, Cora Diamond stresses the role of the imagination in awakening the sense of our humanity. She subtly unthreads the operations of the ethical imagination in literature, but deplores its absence in philosophy. Borrowing the notion of ‘deflection’ from Cavell, Diamond sees ethical understanding ‘present only in a diminished and distorted way in philosophical argumentation’. She does, however, herself make a philosophical, if idiosyncratic, use of the imagination in her appeal to it for a ‘transitional’ understanding (...)
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  19. Bence Nanay (forthcoming). Philosophy of Perception as a Guide to Aesthetics. In Greg Currie, Aaron Meskin, Matthew Kieran & Jon Robson (eds.), Aesthetics and the Sciences of the Mind.
    The aim of this paper is to argue that it is a promising avenue of research to consider philosophy of perception to be a guide to aesthetics. More precisely, my claim is that many, maybe even most, traditional problems in aesthetics are in fact about philosophy of perception that can, as a result, be fruitfully addressed with the help of the conceptual apparatus of philosophy of perception. This claim may sound provocative, but after qualifying what I mean by aesthetics (to (...)
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  20. J. Robson (2013). Appreciating the Acquaintance Principle: A Reply to Konigsberg. British Journal of Aesthetics 53 (2):237-245.
    What is the relationship between acquaintance and aesthetic judgement? Wollheim’s acquaintance principle (AP) is one answer. Amir Konigsberg—the most recent critic of AP—has produced a number of examples which he claims will require us to restrict AP even further than has previously been suggested. I argue that Konigsberg is mistaken and that his examples do not necessitate any further restrictions on AP. This failure, however, is not the result of some specific flaw in Konigsberg’s argument; rather it is an artefact (...)
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  21. Jon Robson (2012). Aesthetic Testimony. Philosophy Compass 7 (1):1-10.
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  22. Mina Ryōke (2009). Dentō Kōgei to Kansei Hyōka. Jaist Press.
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  23. Elisabeth Schellekens & Peter Goldie (eds.) (2011). The Aesthetic Mind: Philosophy and Psychology. Oxford University Press.
    The Aesthetic Mind breaks new ground in bringing together empirical sciences and philosophy to enhance our understanding of aesthetics and the experience of art.
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  24. R. Shusterman (2013). Body and the Arts: The Need for Somaesthetics. Diogenes 59 (1-2):7-20.
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  25. I. N. Shvanëva (2004). Linii͡a Krasoty: Fenomen Ėstetiki V Psikhologii. Rossiĭskai͡a Akademii͡a Estestvennykh Nauk.
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  26. Mark Silcox (2013). On the Value of Make-Believe. Journal of Aesthetic Education 46 (4):20-31.
    Around the middle of the twentieth century, psychologists rediscovered the value of make-believe. Beginning in the 1940s and 1950s, there was a sudden and considerable outpouring of books that explored the pedagogical and therapeutic significance of imaginative play. Numerous experimental studies published since then have emphasized the importance of games of make-believe in the cognitive development and successful socialization of the very young.1 And increased attention to the use of mental imagery and fantasy in various forms of psychotherapy over the (...)
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  27. Murray Smith (2014). Against Nature? Or, Confessions of a Darwinian Modernist. Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 75:151-182.
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  28. John Spackman (2012). Expressiveness, Ineffability, and Nonconceptuality. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 70 (3):303-314.
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  29. Matthew Strohl (2012). Horror and Hedonic Ambivalence. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 70 (2):203-212.
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  30. Qingbing Tong (2008). Tong Qingbing Tan Shen Mei Xin Li. Henan da Xue Chu Ban She.
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  31. Deena Skolnick Weisberg (2014). The Development of Imaginative Cognition. Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 75:85-103.
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  32. Lingli Zhao & Hong Wang (eds.) (2010). Zhongguo Gong Min Shen Mei Xin Li Shi Zheng Yan Jiu =. Beijing da Xue Chu Ban She.
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Aesthetic Cognition, Misc
  1. Bertinetto Alessandro (2012). Paganini Does Not Repeat. Musical Improvisation and the Type/Token Ontology. Teorema (3):105-126.
    This paper explores the ontology of musical improvisation (MI). MI, as process in which creative and performing activities are one and the same generative occurrence, is contrasted with the most widespread conceptual resource used in inquiries about music ontology of the Western tradition: the type/token duality (TtD). TtD, which is used for explaining the relationship between musical works (MWs) and performances, does not fit for MI. Nonetheless MI can be ontologically related to MWs. A MW can ensue from MI and (...)
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  2. Karl Aschenbrenner (1964). Aesthetics and Logic: An Analogy. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 23 (1):63-79.
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  3. Vincent Bergeron & Dominic McIver Lopes (2012). Aesthetic Theory and Aesthetic Science: Prospects for Integration. In Steven Palmer & Arthur Shimamura (eds.), , with Vincent Bergeron, Aesthetic Science: Connecting Minds, Brains, and Experience. Oxford University Press.
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  4. Cameron Buckner (2012). Ordering Our Attributions of Order. Essays in Philosophy 13 (2):423-429.
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  5. Roberto Casati (2004). Methodological Issues in the Study of the Depiction of Cast Shadows: A Case Study in the Relationships Between Art and Cognition. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 62 (2):163–174.
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  6. Clive Cazeaux (2005). Phenomenology and Radio Drama. British Journal of Aesthetics 45 (2):157-174.
    Radio drama is often considered an incomplete or ‘blind’ artform because it creates worlds through sound alone. The charge of incompleteness, I suggest, rests upon the orthodox empiricist conception of sensation as the receipt of separate modalities of sensory impression. However, alternative theories of sensation are offered by phenomenology and—of particular importance to this study—the restructuring of cognition that takes place in these theories plays a central role in phenomenology's account of artistic expression. The significance of this phenomenological link between (...)
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  7. Tom Cochrane (2012). The Emotional Experience of the Sublime. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 42 (2):125-148.
    The literature on the venerable aesthetic category of the sublime often provides us with lists of sublime phenomena — mountains, storms, deserts, volcanoes, oceans, the starry sky, and so on. But it has long been recognized that what matters is the experience of such objects. We then find that one of the most consistent claims about this experience is that it involves an element of fear. Meanwhile, the recognition of the sublime as a category of aesthetic appreciation implies that attraction, (...)
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  8. Rory J. Conces (1994). Aesthetic Alienation and the Art of Modernity. Southwest Philosophy Review 10 (2):149-64.
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  9. Kenneth Dorter (1990). Conceptual Truth and Aesthetic Truth. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 48 (1):37-51.
  10. Catherine Z. Elgin (2000). Reorienting Aesthetics, Reconceiving Cognition. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 58 (3):219-225.
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  11. Russell Epstein (2004). Consciousness, Art, and the Brain: Lessons From Marcel Proust. Consciousness and Cognition 13 (2):213-40.
  12. Anna Ghiglione (2009). Deception in Chinese Buddhist Thinking : Reflections From the Lotus Sutra and the Vimalakirti Sutra. In Leslie Anne Boldt-Irons, Corrado Federici & Ernesto Virgulti (eds.), Disguise, Deception, Trompe-L'oeil: Interdisciplinary Perspectives. Peter Lang. 99--285.
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  13. Mitchell S. Green (2005). &Quot;you Don't See with Your Eyes, You Perceive with Your Mind&Quot;: Knowledge and Perception. In D. Darby & T. Shelby (eds.), Hip Hop and Philosophy. Open Court.
    A major theme in rap lyrics is that the only way to survive is to use your head, be aware, know what’s going on around you. That simple idea packs a lot of background. The most obvious ideas about knowledge turn out if you look at them close up to be pretty questionable. For example: How do we get knowledge about the world? A natural and ancient answer to this question is that much if not all of our knowledge comes (...)
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  14. James R. Hamilton (2006). Understanding Plays. In Saltz Krasner (ed.), Staging Philosophy.
    Hamilton argues that there is a level of understanding of theatrical performances, and narrative performances in particular (called "plays"), that does not require grasp of the large-scale aesthetic features that usually inform the structure of what is presented. This "basic understanding" is required for any spectator to go on to have a deeper understanding and, so, grounds any spectator's understanding of the larger-scale features of a performance.
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  15. Tomas Georg Hellström (2011). Aesthetic Creativity: Insights From Classical Literary Theory on Creative Learning. Educational Philosophy and Theory 43 (4):321-335.
    This paper addresses the subject of textual creativity by drawing on work done in classical literary theory and criticism, specifically new criticism, structuralism and early poststructuralism. The question of how readers and writers engage creatively with the text is closely related to educational concerns, though they are often thought of as separate disciplines. Modern literary theory in many ways collapses this distinction in its concern for how literariness is achieved and, specifically, how ‘literary quality’ is accomplished in the textual and (...)
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  16. Fiona Hughes (2009). Review: Kukla, Aesthetics and Cognition in Kant's Critical Philosophy. [REVIEW] European Journal of Philosophy 17 (3):455-460.
  17. Pedro Karczmarczyk (2007). La subjetivización de la estética y el valor cognitivo del arte según Gadamer. Analogía Filosófica: Revista de Filosofía, Investigación y Difusión (1):127-173.
    En este trabajo analizamos la reivindicación gadameriana del valor cognitivo de arte como un ejemplo de un modo de conocimiento que permite concebir de mejor manera la comprensión que tiene lugar en las ciencias del espíritu. Dicha reivindicación presupone el desconocimiento del valor cognitivo del arte operado por la subjetivización de la estética con Kant y una vuelta a los presupuestos de la tradición humanista. Por ello en la introducción presentamos en esquema los conceptos humanistas de tacto, gusto, sentido común (...)
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  18. Peter Kivy (2007). Music, Language, and Cognition: And Other Essays in the Aesthetics of Music. Oxford University Press.
    I. History. Mainwaring's Handel : its relation to British aesthetics -- Herbert Spencer and a musical dispute -- II. Opera and film. Handel's operas : the form of feeling and the problem of appreciation -- Anti-semitism in Meistersinger? -- Speech, song, and the transparency of medium : on operatic metaphysics -- III. Performance. On the historically informed performance -- Ars perfecta : toward perfection in musical performance? -- IV. Interpretation. Another go at the meaning of music : Koopman, Davies, and (...)
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