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  1. Gary Banham (2002). Mapplethorpe, Duchamp and the Ends of Photography. Angelaki 7 (1):119-128.
    This paper presents an argument for seeing Marcel Duchamp and Robert Mapplethorpe as opposite ends of a tradition of negotiation of art with its conditions of production. The piece takes seriously Kant's suggestions concerning the fine arts and contests views of art that see the Kantian tradition as formally fixed.
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  2. Laura D'Olimpio (2014). Thoughts on Film: Critically Engaging with Both Adorno and Benjamin. Educational Philosophy and Theory 48.
    There is a traditional debate in analytic aesthetics that surrounds the classification of film as Art. While much philosophy devoted to considering film has now moved beyond this debate and accepts film as a mass art, a sub-category of Art proper, it is worth re-considering the criticism of film pre-Deleuze. Much of the criticism of film as pseudo-art is expressed in moral terms. T. W. Adorno, for example, critiques film as ‘mass-cult’; mass produced culture which presents a ‘flattened’ version of (...)
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  3. Andreas Dorschel (2007). Arbeit am Kanon: Zu Hugo Wolfs Musikkritiken. Musicologica Austriaca 26:43-52.
    Cultivation of the musical canon and canonisation of truly original work can be identified as guiding principles of both Hugo Wolf’s artistic and his critical practice. The latter is shaped by classicist tropes; they may serve strategic functions as well, yet cannot be reduced to them. While he rejects the merely old-fashioned, Wolf also leads a striking attack on what he terms “modern music”. His endorsed aesthetics intertwine the old and the new.
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  4. Andreas Dorschel (2006). Über Kanonisierung. Musiktheorie 21 (1):6-12.
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  5. Andreas Dorschel (2005). Was heißt konservativ in der Kunst? Das Horn im 19. Jahrhundert und das Es-Dur-Trio op. 40 von Johannes Brahms: eine ästhetische Fallstudie. Brahms-Studien 14:55-66.
    What does it mean to be conservative? What could it mean in the arts? Whoever merely conserves works of art may be a collector but is not an artist. Brahms’s trio op. 40 conserves the hand horn idiom. Yet its aesthetics will not be captured by the opposition of ‘conservative’ versus ‘progressive’. What is superior in terms of technology, Brahms maintained, need not be superior in terms of art.
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  6. James Grant (2013). The Critical Imagination. Oxford University Press.
    The Critical Imagination is a study of metaphor, imaginativeness, and criticism of the arts. Since the eighteenth century, many philosophers have argued that appreciating art is rewarding because it involves responding imaginatively to a work. Literary works can be interpreted in many ways; architecture can be seen as stately, meditative, or forbidding; and sensitive descriptions of art are often colourful metaphors: music can 'shimmer', prose can be 'perfumed', and a painter's colouring can be 'effervescent'. Engaging with art, like creating it, (...)
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  7. James Harold (2010). The Value of Fictional Worlds (or Why 'the Lord of the Rings' is Worth Reading). Contemporary Aesthetics 8.
    Some works of fiction are widely held by critics to have little value, yet these works are not only popular but also widely admired in ways that are not always appreciated. In this paper I make use of Kendall Walton’s account of fictional worlds to argue that fictional worlds can and often do have value, including aesthetic value, that is independent of the works that create them. In the process, I critique Walton’s notion of fictional worlds and offer a defense (...)
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  8. Jonathan A. Neufeld (forthcoming). Aesthetic Disobedience. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 73 (2).
    It this paper I explore a concept of artistic transgression that I call aesthetic disobedience. By using the term “aesthetic disobedience,” I mean to draw a parallel with the political concept of civil disobedience. Acts of civil disobedience break some law in order publicly to draw attention to, and recommend the reform of, a conflict between the commitments of the legal system and some shared commitments of a community. Acts of aesthetic disobedience do the same in the artworld: they break (...)
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  9. Andrea Sauchelli (forthcoming). The Acquaintance Principle, Aesthetic Judgments, and Conceptual Art. Journal of Aesthetic Education.
    The Acquaintance Principle is the principle according to which judgements concerning the aesthetic value of a work of art proffered by a critic must be based on the critic’s experience(s) of acquaintance with the work itself. The possible exception to this principle would be experiences obtained through other means of transmissibility, related in a particular way to the work in question, that can eventually provide the critic with an adequate basis for judging the artwork. However, recent philosophers claimed that some (...)
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  10. Roger W. H. Savage (1993). Aesthetic Criticism and the Poetics of Modern Music. British Journal of Aesthetics 33 (2):142-151.
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  11. Aaron Smuts (2014). Cinematic. Nordic Journal of Aesthetics 23 (46):78-95.
    Is cinematicity a virtue in film? Is lack of cinematicity a defect? Berys Gaut thinks so. He claims that cinematicity is a pro tanto virtue in film. I disagree. I argue that the term “cinematic” principally refers to some cluster of characteristics found in films featuring the following: expansive scenery, extreme depth of field, high camera positioning, and elaborate tracking shots. We often use the word as a term of praise. And we are likely right to do so. We are (...)
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  12. Eric Warner & Graham Goulden Hough (eds.) (1983). Strangeness and Beauty: An Anthology of Aesthetic Criticism, 1840-1910. Cambridge University Press.
    v. 1. Ruskin to Swinburne -- v. 2. Pater to Arthur Symons.
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