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  1. Gary Banham (2002). Mapplethorpe, Duchamp and the Ends of Photography. Angelaki 7 (1):119-128.
    This paper presents an argument for seeing Marcel Duchamp and Robert Mapplethorpe as opposite ends of a tradition of negotiation of art with its conditions of production. The piece takes seriously Kant's suggestions concerning the fine arts and contests views of art that see the Kantian tradition as formally fixed.
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  2. James Grant (2013). The Critical Imagination. Oxford University Press.
    The Critical Imagination is a study of metaphor, imaginativeness, and criticism of the arts. Since the eighteenth century, many philosophers have argued that appreciating art is rewarding because it involves responding imaginatively to a work. Literary works can be interpreted in many ways; architecture can be seen as stately, meditative, or forbidding; and sensitive descriptions of art are often colourful metaphors: music can 'shimmer', prose can be 'perfumed', and a painter's colouring can be 'effervescent'. Engaging with art, like creating it, (...)
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  3. James Harold (2010). The Value of Fictional Worlds (or Why 'the Lord of the Rings' is Worth Reading). Contemporary Aesthetics 8.
    Some works of fiction are widely held by critics to have little value, yet these works are not only popular but also widely admired in ways that are not always appreciated. In this paper I make use of Kendall Walton’s account of fictional worlds to argue that fictional worlds can and often do have value, including aesthetic value, that is independent of the works that create them. In the process, I critique Walton’s notion of fictional worlds and offer a defense (...)
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  4. Jonathan A. Neufeld (forthcoming). Aesthetic Disobedience. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 73 (2).
    It this paper I explore a concept of artistic transgression that I call aesthetic disobedience. By using the term “aesthetic disobedience,” I mean to draw a parallel with the political concept of civil disobedience. Acts of civil disobedience break some law in order publicly to draw attention to, and recommend the reform of, a conflict between the commitments of the legal system and some shared commitments of a community. Acts of aesthetic disobedience do the same in the artworld: they break (...)
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  5. Roger W. H. Savage (1993). Aesthetic Criticism and the Poetics of Modern Music. British Journal of Aesthetics 33 (2):142-151.
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  6. Aaron Smuts (2014). Cinematic. Nordic Journal of Aesthetics 23 (46):78-95.
    Is cinematicity a virtue in film? Is lack of cinematicity a defect? Berys Gaut thinks so. He claims that cinematicity is a pro tanto virtue in film. I disagree. I argue that the term “cinematic” principally refers to some cluster of characteristics found in films featuring the following: expansive scenery, extreme depth of field, high camera positioning, and elaborate tracking shots. We often use the word as a term of praise. And we are likely right to do so. We are (...)
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  7. Eric Warner & Graham Goulden Hough (eds.) (1983). Strangeness and Beauty: An Anthology of Aesthetic Criticism, 1840-1910. Cambridge University Press.
    v. 1. Ruskin to Swinburne -- v. 2. Pater to Arthur Symons.
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