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  1. Elizabeth Anne Bauer (2004). Response to June Boyce-Tillman, "Towards an Ecology of Music Education&Quot. Philosophy of Music Education Review 12 (2):186-188.
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  2. June Boyce-Tillman (2004). Towards an Ecology of Music Education. Philosophy of Music Education Review 12 (2):102-125.
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  3. Deborah Bradley (2011). In the Space Between the Rock and the Hard Place: State Teacher Certification Guidelines and Music Education for Social Justice. Journal of Aesthetic Education 45 (4):79-96.
    Différend: A case of conflict between (at least) two parties, that cannot be equitably resolved for lack of a rule of judgment applicable to both arguments. . . . A wrong results from the fact that the rules of the genre of discourse by which one judges are not those of the judged genre or genres of discourse. This paper looks at the State of Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction (DPI) Guidelines for Music Teacher Education, a governmentally defined technology of (...)
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  4. Rhett Diessner & Kayla Burke (2011). The Beauty of the Psyche and Eros Myth: Integrating Aesthetics Into Introduction to Psychology. Journal of Aesthetic Education 45 (4):97-108.
    Beginning in the late 1990s we became convinced that our undergraduate psychology students needed classroom experiences that set the conditions for them to become more engaged with beauty. We recognized the intrinsic importance of beauty to human psychological development, beyond any utilitarian concerns.1 But we also believed that there were important psychological benefits to be gained by becoming increasingly engaged with beauty. In this paper we briefly describe some of those benefits that have been documented in the psychological research literature (...)
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  5. Mark Garberich (2004). Response to June Boyce-Tillman, "Towards an Ecology of Music Education&Quot. Philosophy of Music Education Review 12 (2):188-193.
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  6. Claudia Gluschankof (2004). Response to June Boyce-Tillman, "Towards an Ecology of Music Education&Quot. Philosophy of Music Education Review 12 (2):181-186.
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  7. Jan Jagodzinski (2010). Visual Art and Education in an Era of Designer Capitalism: Deconstructing the Oral Eye. Palgrave Macmillan.
    The oral eye is a metaphor for the dominance of global designer capitalism. It refers to the consumerism of a designer aesthetic by the ‘I’ of the neoliberalist subject, as well as the aural soundscapes that accompany the hegemony of the capturing attention through screen cultures. An attempt is made to articulate the historical emergence of such a synoptic machinic regime drawing on Badiou, Bellmer, Deleuze, Guattari, Lacan, Rancière, Virilio, Ziarek, and Žižek to explore contemporary art (post-Situationism) and visual cultural (...)
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  8. Greg Littmann (2012). American Gods is All Lies! In Tracy Lyn Bealer, Rachel Luria & Wayne Yuen (eds.), Neil Gaiman and Philosophy: Gods Gone Wild! Open Court.
  9. Mohan Matthen (forthcoming). Play, Skill, and the Origins of Perceptual Art. British Journal of Aesthetics.
    Art is universal across cultures. Yet, it is biologically expensive because of the energy expended and reduced vigilance. Why do humans make and contemplate it? This paper advances a thesis about the psychological origins of perceptual art. First, it delineates the aspects of art that need explaining: not just why it is attractive, but why fine execution and form—which have to do with how the attraction is achieved—matter over and above attractiveness. Second, it states certain constraints: we need to explain (...)
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  10. Brian Ribeiro (2007). Hume's Standard of Taste and the de Gustibus Sceptic. British Journal of Aesthetics 47 (1):16-28.
    In 'Of the Standard of Taste' Hume aspires to silence the 'extravagant' cavils of the anything-goes de gustibus sceptic by developing a programme of aesthetic education that would lead all properly-trained individuals to a set of agreed-upon aesthetic judgements. But I argue that if we read Hume's essay as an attempted direct theoretical refutation of de gustibus scepticism, Hume fails to achieve his aim. Moreover, although some recent commentators have read the essay as aiming at a less ambitious ‘sceptical solution’ (...)
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  11. Robert Stecker (2012). Plato. In Alessandro Giovannelli (ed.), Aesthetics: The Key Thinkers. 8-20.
  12. June Tillman (2004). Towards an Ecology of Music Education. Philosophy of Music Education Review 12 (2):102-125.
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  13. Sheryl Tuttle Ross (2002). Understanding Propaganda: The Epistemic Merit Model and Its Application to Art. Journal of Aesthetic Education 36 (1):16-30.
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  14. Frederic Will (2011). Ontology and the Products of Spirit: A Classroom Conversation. Journal of Aesthetic Education 45 (4):67-78.
    Among the casualties of the rush to relativism is a central tenet of classical thought: that great works of literature are great in and of themselves and not because of the needs and values of their time. This “canon-based view,” supply taken for granted by Johnson, Arnold, Pope, and Eliot, has long since been shown the door by views ranging from Marxism to today’s cultural studies. These views hold that the great works become great because of the values and concerns (...)
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