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  1. Corey Abel (forthcoming). Whatever It Turns Out To Be: Oakeshott on Aesthetic Experience. In Leslie MArsh Paul Franco (ed.), Whatever It Turns Out To Be: Oakeshott on Aesthetic Experience. Penn State UP
    This essay presents a multifold argument on Oakeshott's aesthetics. First, his famous essay "The Voice of Poetry" deals more explicitly and thoroughly with art than is often acknowledged. Second, aesthetic experience is a competitor to philosophic insight in so far as it discloses the coherence of a world of ideas through its uniting form and content; yet "art" remains a mode. Third, the essay points out that the absence of history from any major role in Oakeshott's most important treatment of (...)
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  2. Abhinavagupta (1968). The Aesthetic Experience According to Abhinavagupta. Varanasi, Chowkhamba Sanskrit Series Office.
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  3. Elizabeth Kemper Adams (1907). The Aesthetic Experience: Its Meaning in a Functional Psychology. Philosophical Review 16:660.
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  4. Virgil C. Aldrich (1966). Back to Aesthetic Experience. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 24 (3):365-371.
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  5. Thomas Alexander (2002). The Aesthetics of Reality : The Development of Dewey's Ecological Theory of Experience. In F. Thomas Burke, D. Micah Hester & Robert B. Talisse (eds.), Dewey's Logical Theory: New Studies and Interpretations. Vanderbilt University Press 3--26.
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  6. Barry Allen (2008). Artifice and Design: Art and Technology in Human Experience. Cornell University Press.
    The book concludes that it is a mistake to think of Art as something subjective, or as an arbitrary social representation, and of Technology as an instrumental ..
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  7. David G. Allen (1978). Aesthetic Perception in Dufrenne's Phenomenology of Aesthetic Experience. Philosophy Today 22 (1):50-64.
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  8. R. T. Allen (1970). The Aesthetic Experience Again. British Journal of Aesthetics 10 (4):344-349.
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  9. Christian G. Allesch (2003). Aesthetic Experience in the Age of Globalization. Dialogue and Universalism 13 (11-12):95-102.
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  10. Meter Amevans (1956). What is Form? Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 15 (1):85-93.
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  11. Luciano Anceschi (1959). L'estetica Dell' Empirismo Inglese. Alfa.
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  12. Douglas R. Anderson (1992). Possibility of the Aesthetic Experience. Idealistic Studies 22 (3):219-220.
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  13. Emma Louise Antz (1930). The Self in the Aesthetic Experience.
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  14. Donald G. Arnstine (1958). Aesthetic Experience in Education. Philosophy of Education:74.
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  15. Karl Aschenbrenner (1976). Conceptual Determination of Aesthetic Experience. Dialectics and Humanism 3 (2):107-115.
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  16. R. N. Austgard (2006). The Aesthetic Experience of Nursing. Nursing Philosophy 7 (1):11–19.
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  17. T. B. (1971). The Aesthetic Field: A Phenomenology of Aesthetic Experience. [REVIEW] Review of Metaphysics 24 (4):741-742.
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  18. Jay E. Bachrach (1974). On Criteria for Aesthetic Experience. Philosophia 4 (2-3):319-326.
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  19. Archie J. Bahm (1958). Aesthetic Experience and Moral Experience. Journal of Philosophy 55 (20):837-846.
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  20. Andrea Baldini (2016). Street Art: A Reply to Riggle. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 74 (2):187-191.
    In this paper, I critically discuss Riggles <span class='Hi'>definitionspan> of <span class='Hi'>streetspan> art. I argue that his <span class='Hi'>definitionspan> has (...)span> art, that is, its subversive power. As a significant consequence of ignoring that essential aspect, Riggle is incapable of fully understanding how <span class='Hi'>streetspan> art transforms public space by turning one corner of the city at the time into contested ground. I also suggest that, when appreciating <span class='Hi'>streetspan> art's subversiveness, its challenge against the Modern separation of art and life appears more radical than Riggle foresees. (shrink)
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  21. Peter Baofu (2007). The Future of Aesthetic Experience: Conceiving a Better Way to Understand Beauty, Ugliness, and the Rest. Cambridge Scholars Pub..
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  22. Monroe C. Beardsley (1969). Aesthetic Experience Regained. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 28 (1):3-11.
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  23. Guy Bennett-Hunter (2014). Ineffability and Religious Experience. Routledge.
    Ineffability—that which cannot be explained in words—lies at the heart of the Christian mystical tradition. It has also been part of every discussion of religious experience since the early twentieth century. Despite this centrality, ineffability is a concept that has largely been ignored by philosophers of religion. In this book, Bennett-Hunter builds on the recent work of David E. Cooper, who argues that the meaning of life can only be understood in terms of an ineffable source on which life depends, (...)
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  24. Guy Bennett-Hunter (2013). Natural Theology and Literature. In Russell Re Manning John Hedley Brooke & Fraser Watts (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Natural Theology. Oxford University Press
    In this chapter, I hope to show, by referring to two specific literary examples, that works of literature can demonstrate the possibility of Natural <span class='Hi'>Theology</span> and can prompt their readers’ thinking along Natural Theological lines by allowing them to have experiences which mirror the structure of those dealt with by Natural <span class='Hi'>Theology</span>.
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  25. Arnold Berleant (2007). A Rose by Any Other Name. Filozofski Vestnik 2 (2):151 - +.
    This is an essay on the tasks and capacities of aesthetic theory and the pitfalls that beset it. I want to show that aesthetics can be enlightening by revealing and studying the facets and dimensions of experiences we call aesthetic, experience that is expansive and revelatory. This kind of experience can also clarify the relation of aesthetics to other areas of knowledge, such as cultural studies, and conversely, the bearing of other disciplines on our aesthetic understanding. Aesthetic theory, however, is (...)
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  26. Arnold Berleant (1986). Experience and Theory in Aesthetics. In Michael H. Mitias (ed.), Possibility of the Aesthetic Experience. Distributors for the U.S. And Canada, Kluwer Academic 91--106.
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  27. Alessandro Bertinetto (2006). Arte como desrealización. Daimon: Revista de Filosofia 39:175-185.
    The paper recognizes the failure of contemporary non-aesthetic theories of art and aims at recovering the phenomenological notion of derealization – which re-emerges in A. Dantoʼs idea of the ʻbracketting effectʼ of art –, in order to explain art and art-experience. The main point is that art makes us free from the ʻreal worldʼ through an act of derealization that leads to the establishment of possible or fictional worlds different from the one we live in. Artworks are primarly imaginary, unreal (...)
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  28. Landon E. Beyer (1985). Aesthetic Experience for Teacher Preparation and Social Change. Educational Theory 35 (4):385-397.
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  29. V. K. Bharadwaja (2000). Biswas, Goutam: Art as Dialogue: Essays in Phenomenology of Aesthetic Experience. Indian Philosophical Quarterly 27 (1/2):205-205.
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  30. Josebe Miren Bilbao-Henry-de-Bueno (1999). The Aesthetic Experience of the Authentic Painting: A Test for Aesthetic Meaning. Dissertation, Yale University
    Most scholarship about paintings in the Western artistic tradition rests upon the assumption that the object of its analysis is authentic as in "authentic Picasso" or "authentic Rembrandt." In particular, art historical and stylistic analysis of paintings originates from the conviction that the painting in question comes from the hands of an individual painter, and therefore, from the conviction that it is what it purports to be, and was created under a specific set of circumstances. Most views of the aesthetic (...)
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  31. Ulrik Bisgaard (2005). The Return of the Aesthetic Experience of Nature–Historical and Present Conceptions. Nordic Journal of Aesthetics 17 (32).
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  32. Margaret Grace Black (2000). Teaching for the Aesthetic Experience. Dissertation, Lesley University
    This study answered the question, "How to teach for the Aesthetic Experience in the visual arts?" Six women art educators served as study participants. The researcher identified five components of aesthetic experience: perception, cognition, imagination, emotion, and discovery. Informed by theories of conversational teaching methods, aesthetic development, and adult development, the researcher designed and executed a qualitative case study that incorporated all five components. Art viewing, art making, and evaluative response were the tools used in the study to foster aesthetic (...)
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  33. Deanne Bogdan (2003). Musical Spirituality: Reflections on Identity and the Ethics of Embodied Aesthetic Experience in/and the Academy. Journal of Aesthetic Education 37 (2):80-98.
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  34. Kenneth Larry Brewer (1998). Lost in a Book: Aesthetic Absorption, 1820-1880. Dissertation, Stanford University
    This dissertation examines "aesthetic absorption" in Victorian England. The feeling of "losing oneself" in a book was the starting-point of Victorian aesthetic experience. Chapter One defines aesthetic absorption, drawing on research into "flow" by contemporary psychologist Mihalyi Csikszentmihalyi. Csikszentmihalyi's subjects, like many Victorian readers, experience absorption when they are fully utilizing their mental and physical capacities. Chapter Two explores a barrier to the experience of aesthetic absorption, "didacticism," focusing on Anthony Trollope. For Trollope, overt didacticism prevents the novel from having (...)
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  35. Maria Brincker (2015). The Aesthetic Stance - on the Conditions and Consequences of Becoming a Beholder. In Alfonsina Scarinzi (ed.), Aesthetics and the Embodied Mind: Beyond Art Theory and the Cartesian Mind-Body Dichotomy. Springer 117-138.
    What does it mean to be an aesthetic beholder? Is it different than simply being a perceiver? Most theories of aesthetic perception focus on 1) features of the perceived object and its presentation or 2) on psychological evaluative or emotional responses and intentions of perceiver and artist. In this chapter I propose that we need to look at the process of engaged perception itself, and further that this temporal process of be- coming a beholder must be understood in its embodied, (...)
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  36. Richard Brown, Kant, Polysolipsism, and the Real Unity of Experience.
    The question I am interested in revolves around Kant’s notion of the unity of experience. My central claim will be that, apart from the unity of experiencings and the unity of individual substances, there is a third unity: the unity of Experience. I will argue that this third unity can be conceived of as a sort of ‘experiential space’ with the Aesthetic and Categories as dimensions. I call this ‘Euclidean Experience’ to emphasize the idea that individual experiencings have a ‘location’ (...)
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  37. S. Buckler (2003). Our Sense of the Real: Aesthetic Experience and Arendtian Politics. By Kimberley Curtis. The European Legacy 8 (6):806-806.
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  38. Laurence Buermeyer (1927). The Aesthetic Experience. Philosophical Review 36:199.
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  39. Nicolas J. Bullot (2009). Material Anamnesis and the Prompting of Aesthetic Worlds. Journal of Consciousness Studies 16 (1):85-109.
    Many scholars view artworks as the products of cultural history and arbitrary institutional conventions. Others construe art as the result of psychological mechanisms internal to the organism. These historical and psychological approaches are often viewed as foes rather than friends. Is it possible to combine these two approaches in a unified analysis of the perception and consciousness of artworks? I defend a positive answer to this question and propose a psycho-historical theory, which argues that artworks are historical and material artefacts (...)
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  40. Steven Burns & Alice MacLachlan (2004). Getting It: On Jokes and Art. AE: Journal of the Canadian Society of Aesthetics 10.
    “What is appreciation?” is a basic question in the philosophy of art, and the analogy between appreciating a work of art and getting a joke can help us answer it. We first propose a subjective account of aesthetic appreciation (I). Then we consider jokes (II). The difference between getting a joke and not, or what it is to get it right, can often be objectively articulated. Such explanations cannot substitute for the joke itself, and indeed may undermine the very power (...)
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  41. E. F. Carrit (1963). The Aesthetic Experience of Architecture. British Journal of Aesthetics 3 (1):67-69.
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  42. E. F. Carritt (1946). NAHM, M. C. -Aesthetic Experience and its Presuppositions. [REVIEW] Mind 55:274.
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  43. N. Carroll (2001). Enjoyment, Indifference, and Aesthetic Experience: Comments for Robert Stecker. British Journal of Aesthetics 41 (1):81-83.
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  44. Noël Carroll (2012). Recent Approaches to Aesthetic Experience. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 70 (2):165-177.
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  45. Noël Carroll (2006). Ethics and Aesthetics: Replies to Dickie, Stecker, and Livingston. British Journal of Aesthetics 46 (1):82-95.
    Both my deflationary approach to aesthetic experience and what I call moderate moralism have been challenged recently in the pages of the British Journal of Aesthetics by Paisley Livingston, Robert Stecker, and George Dickie. In this essay, I attempt to deal with their objections while also trying to move the debate to new ground.
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  46. Noël Carroll (2004). Non-Perceptual Aesthetic Properties: Comments for James Shelley. British Journal of Aesthetics 44 (4):413-423.
    James Shelley has raised the important question of whether it is possible to have aesthetic experiences of imperceptible artworks. This issue is important for determining whether or not the aesthetic theory of art can deal with certain cases of conceptual art. Shelley has argued that it is possible to have aesthetic experiences of imperceptibilia. And in this article, I concur with him, though for reasons different from his. Nevertheless, I go on to argue that this still fails to vindicate the (...)
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  47. Noël Carroll (2002). Aesthetic Experience Revisited. British Journal of Aesthetics 42 (2):145-168.
    In this article I divide theories of aesthetic experience into three sorts: the affectoriented approach, the axiologically oriented approach, and the content-oriented approach. I then go on to defend a version of the content-oriented approach.
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  48. Allan Casebier (1991). Film and Phenomenology: Toward a Realist Theory of Cinematic Representation. Cambridge University Press.
    In Film and Phenomenology, Allan Casebier develops a theory of representation first indicated in the writings of the father of phenomenology, Edmund Husserl, and then applies it to the case of cinematic representation. This work provides one of the clearest expositions of Husserl's highly influential but often obscure thought. It also demonstrates the power of phenomenology to illuminate the experience of the art form unique to the twentieth-century cinema. Film and Phenomenology is intended as an antidote to all hitherto existing (...)
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  49. Ron Chrisley, Painting an Experience.
    Paintings are usually paintings of things: a room in a palace, a princess, a dog. But what would it be to paint not those things, but the experience of seeing those things? Las Meninas is sufficiently sophisticated and masterfully executed to help us explore this question. Of course, there are many kinds of paintings: some abstract, some conceptual, some with more traditional subjects. Let us start with a focus on naturalistically depictive paintings: paintings that aim to cause an experience in (...)
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  50. Sukyung Chung (2008). How a Map Works in the Land Arts. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 12:9-17.
    Based on the Kantian aesthetics, Modernist critics insisted that an art experience is disinterested aesthetic experience different and independent from cognitive experience, and excluded the cognitive dimension from the art experience. But since 1960s, many art practices and theories that were challenging Modernismappeared. As a result, contemporary arts accept the cognitive dimension as an essential part of art experience. Minimalism made a great contribution to this change and established a new paradigm of art. Emphasis on the active and complicated experience (...)
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