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  1. James Andow (2015). A Semantic Solution to the Problem with Aesthetic Testimony. Acta Analytica 30 (2):211-218.
    There is something peculiar about aesthetic testimony. It seems more difficult to gain knowledge of aesthetic properties based solely upon testimony than it is in the case of other types of property. In this paper, I argue that we can provide an adequate explanation at the level of the semantics of aesthetic language, without defending any substantive thesis in epistemology or about aesthetic value/judgement. If aesthetic predicates are given a non-invariantist semantics, we can explain the supposed peculiar difficulty with aesthetic (...)
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  2. Antony Aumann (2013). Kierkegaard, Paraphrase, and the Unity of Form and Content. Philosophy Today 57 (4):376-387.
    On one standard view, paraphrasing Kierkegaard requires no special literary talent. It demands no particular flair for the poetic. However, Kierkegaard himself rejects this view. He says we cannot paraphrase in a straightforward fashion some of the ideas he expresses in a literary format. To use the words of Johannes Climacus, these ideas defy direct communication. In this paper, I piece together and defend the justification Kierkegaard offers for this position. I trace its origins to concerns raised by Lessing and (...)
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  3. Jiri Benovsky (2011). Three Kinds of Realism About Photographs. Journal of Speculative Philosophy 25 (4):375-395.
    In this paper, I explore the nature of photographs by comparing them to hand-made paintings, as well as by comparing traditional film photography with digital photography, and I concentrate on the question of realism. Several different notions can be distinguished here. Are photographs such that they depict the world in a 'realist' or a 'factive' way ? Do they show us the world as it is with accuracy and reliability other types of pictures don't posses ? Do they allow us, (...)
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  4. R. Berger (1990). Science and Art: The New Golem: From the Transdisciplinary to an Ultra-Disciplinary Epistemology. Diogenes 38 (152):124-146.
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  5. Charles B. Daniels (1988). Philosophy of the Film: Epistemology, Ontology, Aesthetics Ian Jarvie New York and London: Routledge & Kegan Paul, 1987. Pp. 407. $41.50. [REVIEW] Dialogue 27 (03):554-.
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  6. Fabian Dorsch (2013). Non‐Inferentialism About Justification – The Case of Aesthetic Judgements. Philosophical Quarterly 63 (253):660-682.
    In this article, I present two objections against the view that aesthetic judgements – that is, judgemental ascriptions of aesthetic qualities like elegance or harmony – are justified non-inferentially. The first is that this view cannot make sense of our practice to support our aesthetic judgements by reference to lower-level features of the objects concerned. The second objection maintains that non-inferentialism about the justification of aesthetic judgements cannot explain why our aesthetic interest in artworks and other objects is limited to (...)
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  7. Andreas Dorschel (ed.) (2009). Kunst und Wissen in der Moderne. Böhlau.
    The relationship between art and knowledge is subject to historical change. In the early 19th century, the view was still prevalent that art was about eternal values, especially beauty, whereas science was entirely involved in historical time: The former was seen as contemplative, the latter as searching. But ever since, most artists have given up that stance and hence the once imagined detachment from historical time. They search, and sometimes research, too. Does that mean that art and science have come (...)
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  8. Andreas Dorschel (2004). Erwartung und Vorurteil in der Musik. In Dem Ohr voraus. Erwartung und Vorurteil in der Musik. Universal Edition 12-23.
    Art is whatever it is mediated through anticipations of diverse kinds. To the temporal art of music such anticipations are crucial. Composers and performers build up expectations in their musical works and interpretations, thwart them, delay their fulfillment, fulfill them. Some of these expectations arise on the level of chosen genre, others are peculiar to the individual composition. Listeners, correspondingly, may adjust their expectations or, alternatively, attempt to uphold them at any price, turning them into prejudices. And, as anything in (...)
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  9. Anoop Gupta (2010). Rethinking Aristotle's Poetics : The Pragmatic Aspect of Art and Knowledge. Journal of Aesthetic Education 44 (4):60-80.
    And in general it is a sign of the man who knows and of the man who does not know that the former can teach, and therefore we think art more truly knowledge than experience is; for the artist can teach, and men of experience cannot. When pragmatism first gained favor in the early twentieth century, some British philosophers like Russell regarded it as evidencing their perception of America’s crude and enterprising spirit.1 The Imperial jab lay in this: that just (...)
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  10. William Hirstein (2013). Memories of Art. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 36 (2):146 - 147.
    Although the art-historical context of a work of art is important to our appreciation of it, it is our knowledge of that history that plays causal roles in producing the experience itself. This knowledge is in the form of memories, both semantic memories about the historical circumstances, but also episodic memories concerning our personal connections with an artwork. We also create representations of minds in order to understand the emotions that artworks express.
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  11. Christoph Jäger (2005). Kunst, Kontext und Erkenntnis. In Christoph Jäger & Georg Meggle (eds.), Kunst und Erkenntnis. Mentis 9-39.
  12. Christoph Jäger & Georg Meggle (eds.) (2005). Kunst Und Erkenntnis (Art and Knowledge). Mentis.
  13. Matthew Kieran (2010). The Vice of Snobbery: Aesthetic Knowledge, Justification and Virtue in Art Appreciation. Philosophical Quarterly 60 (239):243-263.
    Apparently snobbery undermines justification for and legitimacy of aesthetic claims. It is also pervasive in the aesthetic realm, much more so than we tend to presume. If these two claims are combined, a fundamental problem arises: we do not know whether or not we are justified in believing or making aesthetic claims. Addressing this new challenge requires an epistemological story which underpins when, where and why snobbish judgement is problematic, and how appreciative claims can survive. This leads towards a virtue-theoretic (...)
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  14. Amir Konigsberg (2012). The Acquaintance Principle, Aesthetic Autonomy, and Aesthetic Appreciation. British Journal of Aesthetics 52 (2):153-168.
    The acquaintance principle (AP) and the view it expresses have recently been tied to a debate surrounding the possibility of aesthetic testimony, which, plainly put, deals with the question whether aesthetic knowledge can be acquired through testimony—typically aesthetic and non-aesthetic descriptions communicated from person to person. In this context a number of suggestions have been put forward opting for a restricted acceptance of AP. This paper is an attempt to restrict AP even more.
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  15. Sacha Loeve (2011). Sensible Atoms: A Techno-Aesthetic Approach to Representation. [REVIEW] NanoEthics 5 (2):203-222.
    This essay argues that nano-images would be best understood with an aesthetical approach rather than with an epistemological critique. For this aim, I propose a ‘techno-aesthetical’ approach: an enquiry into the way instruments and machines transform the logic of the sensible itself and not just the way by which it represents something else. Unlike critical epistemology, which remains self-evidently grounded on a representationalist philosophy, the approach developed here presents the advantage of providing a clear-cut distinction between image-as-representation and other modes (...)
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  16. Dominic Lopes & Matthew Kieran (eds.) (2006). Knowing Art: Essays in Epistemology and Aesthetics. Springer.
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  17. Kevin Melchionne (2011). A New Problem for Aesthetics. Contemporary Aesthetics 9.
    The essay introduces the problem of aesthetic unreliability, the variety of ways in which it is difficult to grasp our aesthetic experience and the consequent confusion and unreliability of what we take as our taste.
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  18. Aaron Meskin (2004). Aesthetic Testimony: What Can We Learn From Others About Beauty and Art? Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 69 (1):65–91.
    The thesis that aesthetic testimony cannot provide aesthetic justification or knowledge is widely accepted--even by realists about aesthetic properties and values. This Kantian position is mistaken. Some testimony about beauty and artistic value can provide a degree of aesthetic justification and, perhaps, even knowledge. That is, there are cases in which one can be justified in making an aesthetic judgment purely on the basis of someone else's testimony. But widespread aesthetic unreliability creates a problem for much aesthetic testimony. Hence, most (...)
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  19. Aaron Meskin & Jon Robson (2015). Taste and Acquaintance. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 73 (2):127-139.
    The analogy between gustatory taste and critical or aesthetic taste plays a recurring role in the history of aesthetics. Our interest in this article is in a particular way in which gustatory judgments are frequently thought to be analogous to critical judgments. It appears obvious to many that to know how a particular object tastes we must have tasted it for ourselves; the proof of the pudding, we are all told, is in the eating. And it has seemed just as (...)
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  20. Franco Passalacqua, Università Degli Studi di Milano, Federico Pianzola & Università Degli Studi di Firenze, Continuity and Break Points: Some Aspects of the Contemporary Debate in Narrative Theory.
    This article presents some reflections on the concepts, terminology, and epistemological grounds of narrative theory. Our remarks are focused on the proposals advanced at the first RRN conference and they concern in particular two issues: the theoretical difference between classical and postclassical narratology and the paradigms of the contemporary debate. In the first part of the paper we focus on the definitional task of narrative theory; in the second part we describe the epistemology of and the theories built on two (...)
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  21. Franco Passalacqua, Università Degli Studi di Milano, Federico Pianzola & Università Degli Studi di Firenze, The First RRN Conference. Redefinitions of the Narrative Sequence.
    This is a brief report of the first conference organized in Fribourg (CH) by the Réseau Romand de Narratologie (RRN). The title of the conference was Redefinitons of the Sequence in Postclassical Narratology.
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  22. Dominique Raynaud (2013). Leonardo, Optics and Ophthalmology. In F. Fiorani & A. Nova (eds.), Leonardo da Vinci and Optics. Marsilio 255-276.
    Leonardo’s research on the eye and vision has given rise to contrasting assessments, ranging from the apology of his explanation of how the eye works as a camera obscura to the most critical attitude. The negative judgments derive some of their strength from the fact that the practice of anatomy and linear perspective are well documented in Leonardo. Thus one expects him to have had empirically based knowledge of the organs dissected, as well as comprehensive skills in optics. As we (...)
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  23. Dominique Raynaud (2013). Optics and Perspective Prior to Alberti. In B. Paolozzi Strozzi & M. Bormand (eds.), The Springtime of the Renaissance. Mandragora 165-171.
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  24. Mark Reybrouck (2005). A Biosemiotic and Ecological Approach to Music Cognition: Event Perception Between Auditory Listening and Cognitive Economy. [REVIEW] Axiomathes. An International Journal in Ontology and Cognitive Systems. 15 (2):229-266.
    This paper addresses the question whether we can conceive of music cognition in ecosemiotic terms. It claims that music knowledge must be generated as a tool for adaptation to the sonic world and calls forth a shift from a structural description of music as an artifact to a process-like approach to dealing with music. As listeners, we are observers who construct and organize our knowledge and bring with us our observational tools. What matters is not merely the sonic world in (...)
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  25. J. Robson (2013). Appreciating the Acquaintance Principle: A Reply to Konigsberg. British Journal of Aesthetics 53 (2):237-245.
    What is the relationship between acquaintance and aesthetic judgement? Wollheim’s acquaintance principle (AP) is one answer. Amir Konigsberg—the most recent critic of AP—has produced a number of examples which he claims will require us to restrict AP even further than has previously been suggested. I argue that Konigsberg is mistaken and that his examples do not necessitate any further restrictions on AP. This failure, however, is not the result of some specific flaw in Konigsberg’s argument; rather it is an artefact (...)
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  26. Jon Robson (2015). Norms of Belief and Norms of Assertion in Aesthetics. Philosophers' Imprint 15 (6).
    Why is it that we cannot legitimately make certain aesthetic assertions – for instance that ‘Guernica is harrowing’ or that ‘The Rite of Spring is strangely beautiful’ – on the basis of testimony alone? In this paper I consider a species of argument intended to demonstrate that the best explanation for the impermissibility of such assertions is that a particular view of the norms of aesthetic belief – pessimism concerning aesthetic testimony – is correct. I begin by outlining the strongest (...)
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  27. Jon Robson (2012). Aesthetic Testimony. Philosophy Compass 7 (1):1-10.
    It is frequently claimed that we can learn very little, if anything, about the aesthetic character of an artwork on the basis of testimony. Such disparaging assessments of the epistemic value of aesthetic testimony contrast markedly with our acceptance of testimony as an important source of knowledge in many other areas. There have, however, been a number of challenges to this orthodoxy of late; from those who seek to deny that such a contrast exists as well as attempts by those (...)
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  28. Elisabeth Schellekens & Peter Goldie (eds.) (2011). The Aesthetic Mind: Philosophy and Psychology. Oxford University Press.
    The Aesthetic Mind breaks new ground in bringing together empirical sciences and philosophy to enhance our understanding of aesthetics and the experience of art.
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  29. Achim Vesper (2014). Literatur und Aussagen über Allgemeines. In Christoph Demmerling Íngrid Vendrell Ferran (ed.), Wahrheit, Wissen und Erkenntnis in der Literatur. Philosophische Beiträge. De Gruyter 181-196.
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  30. Daniel Whiting (2015). The Glass is Half Empty: A New Argument for Pessimism About Aesthetic Testimony. British Journal of Aesthetics 55 (1):91-107.
    Call the view that it is possible to acquire aesthetic knowledge via testimony, optimism, and its denial, pessimism. In this paper, I offer a novel argument for pessimism. It works by turning attention away from the basis of the relevant belief, namely, testimony, and toward what that belief in turn provides a basis for, namely, other attitudes. In short, I argue that an aesthetic belief acquired via testimony cannot provide a rational basis for further attitudes, such as admiration, and that (...)
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  31. Christopher Williams (2009). Aesthetic Judgment, Acquaintance and Testimony: A Reply to Lopes. Modern Schoolman 86 (3-4):283-288.
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  32. Elizabeth J. Wood, Philosophical Perceptions of Art and Education with Emphasis on the Analytic Philosophy of Nelson Goodman.
    An epistemological dichotomy involving two kinds of knowledge has evolved historically since the time of the Greeks. This has led to the isolating from one another of the functions of understanding and evaluation, and to the belief that understanding is necessary to science, whereas appreciation is the aim of art.
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