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  1. C. Abell & K. Bantinaki (eds.) (2010). Philosophical Perspectives on Depiction. Oxford University Press.
    This volume of specially written essays by leading philosophers offers to set the agenda for the philosophy of depiction.
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  2. Rita Aiello & John A. Sloboda (eds.) (1994). Musical Perceptions. Oxford University Press.
    Musical Perceptions is a much-needed text that introduces students of both music and psychology to the study of music perception and cognition. Because the book aims to foster a closer interaction between research in the science and the art of music, both psychologists and musicians contribute chapters on a wide range of topics, including the philosophy of music; research in musical performance; perception of melody, tonality, and rhythm; pedagogical issues; language and music; and neural networks. With their unique ability to (...)
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  3. Virgil C. Aldrich & P. E. Slatter (1978). Aesthetic Perception and Objectivity. British Journal of Aesthetics 18 (3):209-216.
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  4. Rudolf Arnheim (1981). Style as a Gestalt Problem. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 39 (3):281-289.
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  5. Rudolf Arnheim (1974). Colors: Irrational and Rational. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 33 (2):149-154.
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  6. Rudolf Arnheim (1970). Visual Thinking. London,Faber.
    "Groundbreaking when first published in 1969, this book is now of even greater relevance to make the reader aware of the need to educate the visual sense, a ...
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  7. Rudolf Arnheim (1961). Perceptual Analysis of a Cosmological Symbol. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 19 (4):389-399.
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  8. Andrea Baldini (2014). Historical Formalism in Music: Toward a Philosophical Theory of Musical Form. Contemporary Aesthetics 12:N/A.
    In this paper I begin to fashion a theory of musical form that I call historical formalism. Historical formalism posits that our perception of the formal properties of a musical work is informed by considerations not only of artistic categories but also of the historical, sociopolitical, and cultural circumstances within which that work was composed.
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  9. Katerina Bantinaki (2007). Pictorial Perception as Illusion. British Journal of Aesthetics 47 (3):268-279.
    The focus of this paper is on E. H. Gombrich's claim that pictorial perception is a case of illusion. My aim is to point out that, on the one hand, the interpretation of this claim that is widely accepted in pictorial theory is not supported by Gombrich's analysis of pictorial perception; and, on the other hand, that the interpretation of the claim that I see as more compatible with Gombrich's analysis is not consistent with relevant facts about our relation to (...)
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  10. Andrew Benjamin (2010). Colouring Philosophy: Appel, Lyotard and Art's Work. Critical Horizons 11 (3):379-395.
    Colour plays a fundamental role in the philosophical treatments of painting. Colour while it is an essential part of the work of art cannot be divorced from the account of painting within which it is articulated. This paper begins with a discussion of the role of colour in Schelling's conception of art. Nonetheless its primary concern is to develop a critical encounter with Jean-François Lyotard's analysis of the Dutch painter Karel Appel. The limits of Lyotard's writings on painting, which this (...)
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  11. Arthur Berndtson (1960). Beauty, Embodiment, and Art. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 21 (1):50-61.
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  12. M. A. Boden (2000). Crafts, Perception, and the Possibilities of the Body. British Journal of Aesthetics 40 (3):289-301.
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  13. Paul Boghossian (2010). The Perception of Music: Comments on Peacocke. British Journal of Aesthetics 50 (1):71-76.
    (No abstract is available for this citation).
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  14. David A. Booth (2003). Phenomenology is Art, Not Psychological or Neural Science. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (4):408-409.
    It is tough to relate visual perception or other achievements to physiological processing in the central nervous system. The diagrammatic, algebraic, and verbal pictures of how sights seem to Lehar do not advance understanding of how we manage to see what is in the world. There are well-known conceptual reasons why no such purely introspective approach can be productive.
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  15. Maria Brincker (2015). The Aesthetic Stance - on the Conditions and Consequences of Becoming a Beholder. In Alfonsina Scarinzi (ed.), Aesthetics and the Embodied Mind: Beyond Art Theory and the Cartesian Mind-Body Dichotomy. Springer 117-138.
    What does it mean to be an aesthetic beholder? Is it different than simply being a perceiver? Most theories of aesthetic perception focus on 1) features of the perceived object and its presentation or 2) on psychological evaluative or emotional responses and intentions of perceiver and artist. In this chapter I propose that we need to look at the process of engaged perception itself, and further that this temporal process of be- coming a beholder must be understood in its embodied, (...)
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  16. Donald Brook (1969). Perception and the Appraisal of Sculpture. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 27 (3):323-330.
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  17. Malcolm Budd (2009). Response to Christopher Peacocke's 'the Perception of Music: Sources of Significance'. British Journal of Aesthetics 49 (3):289-292.
    My response consists essentially of an attempt to throw light on (and encourage further elucidation of) Peacocke's basic proposal as to how musical expressiveness should be understood by a comparison and contrast with a somewhat similar suggestion of mine.
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  18. Malcolm Budd (2003). Musical Movement and Aesthetic Metaphors. British Journal of Aesthetics 43 (3):209-223.
    Roger Scruton's extraordinarily rich and impressive book The Aesthetics of Music has not received the attention it deserves. In this paper I take issue with one of its most striking claims, namely that the basic perceptions of music are informed by spatial concepts understood metaphorically. To evaluate this claim it is necessary to grasp Scruton's theory of metaphor, which has largely been neglected. I sketch his theory and derive from it the essence of his claim about the fundamental role of (...)
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  19. Noël Carroll (2001). Modernity and the Plasticity of Perception. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 59 (1):11-17.
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  20. Lia Chavez, In Radical Form(Ation): Bergsonism, Bodies in Process, and Unconscious Vision.
    In this practice-led research I aim, through text and visual artworks, to examine the dynamic, vitalist body of ‘emergent forms’ and becomings in art. From a theoretical standpoint, I focus my examination on Classical Bergsonism and the unique implications it holds for the figure in time. I probe Henri Bergson’s insistence upon the notion that life and reality are in constant flux in order to explore how this central claim could shed light on the status of the dynamic or shifting (...)
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  21. Tom Cochrane (2009). Joint Attention to Music. British Journal of Aesthetics 49 (1):59-73.
    This paper contrasts individual and collective listening to music, with particular regard to the expressive qualities of music. In the first half of the paper a general model of joint attention is introduced. According to this model, perceiving together modifies the intrinsic structure of the perceptual task, and encourages a convergence of responses to a greater or lesser degree. The model is then applied to music, looking first at the silent listening situation typical to the classical concert hall, and second (...)
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  22. Tracie E. Costantino (2004). Training Aesthetic Perception: John Dewey on the Educational Role of Art Museums. Educational Theory 54 (4):399-417.
    In this article I examine Dewey's ambivalent attitude toward art museums — criticizing their existence as repositories for the rich, while exploring their educational potential — by analyzing Dewey's comments on museums in various texts, by relating his ideas to museum education theories and practice of the time, and by exploring his involvement with Albert Barnes and the Barnes Foundation. Specifically, I discuss how these men influenced each other and consider possible reasons for Dewey's involvement with a “capitalist collector” such (...)
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  23. Jonathan Crary (2000). Suspensions of Perception. Attention, Spectacle, and Modern Culture. The MIT Press.
    Suspensions of Perception decisively relocates the problem of aesthetic contemplation within a broader collective encounter with the unstable nature of ...
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  24. Paul Crowther (1982). Merleau–Ponty: Perception Into Art. British Journal of Aesthetics 22 (2):138-149.
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  25. Gregory Currie (1991). Photography, Painting and Perception. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 49 (1):23-29.
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  26. Peter De Bolla (2003). The Education of the Eye: Painting, Landscape, and Architecture in Eighteenth-Century Britain. Stanford University Press.
    The Education of the Eye examines the origins of visual culture in eighteenth-century Britain. It claims that at the moment when works of visual art were first displayed and contemplated as aesthetic objects two competing descriptions of the viewer or spectator promoted two very different accounts of culture. The first was constructed on knowledge, on what one already knew, while the second was grounded in the eye itself. Though the first was most likely to lead to a socially and politically (...)
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  27. M. DetoMmaso, C. PeCoraro, M. Sardaro, C. Serpino, G. Lancioni & P. Livrea (2008). Influence of Aesthetic Perception on Visual Event-Related Potentials. Consciousness and Cognition 17 (3):933-945.
    The aim of the study was to assess the effects of visual aesthetic perception on event-related potentials . Eight subjects assigned an aesthetic judgment and a 10-step beauty estimation to the target stimuli, consisting of famous artistic pictures and geometric shapes. In a further task, the subjects performed a motor response to the previously judged pictures and geometric shapes. ERPs were recorded through 54 scalp electrodes during both tasks. The P3b amplitude was increased during the categorization of the geometric shapes (...)
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  28. George Dickie (1984). Stolnitz's Attitude: Taste and Perception. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 43 (2):195-203.
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  29. John Dilworth (2010). Depictive Seeing and Double Content. In Catharine Abell & Katerina Bantinaki (ed.), Philosophical Perspectives on Picturing. Oxford University Press
    A picture provides both configurational content concerning its design features, and recognitional content about its external subject. But how is this possible, since all that a viewer can actually see is the picture's own design? I argue that the most plausible explanation is that a picture's design has a dual function. It both encodes artistically relevant design content, and in turn that design content encodes the subject content of the picture--producing overall a double content structure. Also, it is highly desirable (...)
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  30. John Dilworth (2003). Medium, Subject Matter and Representation. Southern Journal of Philosophy 41 (1):45-62.
    I argue that the physical marks on a canvas resulting from an artist's intentional, stylistic and expressive acts cannot themselves be the artist's expression, but instead they serve to signify or indicate those acts. Thus there is a kind of indicative content associated with a picture that is distinct from its subject matter (or 'representational content'). I also argue that this kind of indicative content is closely associated with the specific artistic medium chosen by the artist as her expressive medium, (...)
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  31. Andreas Dorschel (2015). Mundrys Nuancen. In Heike Hoffmann (ed.), Salzburg Biennale 2015. Salzburg Biennale 62-64.
    The production of artworks can be based on a fixed modus operandi, i.e., on a general manner and, alongside, specific patterns to be applied all over again. Alternatively, each artwork can be seen as (cor-)responding to an individual problem for which there is no recipe; in this case it needs to be looked at afresh. That approach characterizes the aesthetics of music composer Isabel Mundry (*1963); her art, ever unpredictable, is one of nuances.
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  32. Andreas Dorschel (2006). Vom Beginnen. Bruckner und die Wechselfälle des Ursprungs im 19. Jahrhundert. In Hans-Joachim Hinrichsen & Laurenz Lütteken (eds.), Bruckner – Brahms: Urbanes Milieu als kompositorische Lebenswelt im Wien der Gründerzeit. Bärenreiter 128-143.
    ‚Origin‘ must be counted among the 19th century’s obsessions. Following the lead of 18th century Enlightenment, subverting origins rather than venerating them became a theoretical preoccupation. Yet art – specifically the art of music – dealt with origins in a different way. That way eludes the obvious alternative of either awe or unmasking. It is specifically modern: The work of art attends to its own genesis. The different versions of the beginning of Bruckner’s Fourth Symphony disclose a subtle craft of (...)
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  33. Andreas Dorschel (2004). Erwartung und Vorurteil in der Musik. In Dem Ohr voraus. Erwartung und Vorurteil in der Musik. Universal Edition 12-23.
    Art is whatever it is mediated through anticipations of diverse kinds. To the temporal art of music such anticipations are crucial. Composers and performers build up expectations in their musical works and interpretations, thwart them, delay their fulfillment, fulfill them. Some of these expectations arise on the level of chosen genre, others are peculiar to the individual composition. Listeners, correspondingly, may adjust their expectations or, alternatively, attempt to uphold them at any price, turning them into prejudices. And, as anything in (...)
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  34. Laurence Dreyfus (2009). Christopher Peacocke's 'the Perception of Music'. British Journal of Aesthetics 49 (3):293-297.
    Unlike the grasp of metaphor in natural language, there is in music a patent confusion of roles between the ‘tenor’ and ‘vehicle’ of a metaphor: the expressive content configures the metaphorical understanding of a musical moment as much as the experience of the musical moment shapes how we perceive expressive content. This observation prompts consideration of a model (different from Peacocke’s) in which a spiralling reciprocity of invertible metaphorical operations gives rise to the specificity of the aesthetic experience. On this (...)
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  35. Mikel Dufrenne (1983). Perception, Meaning, and Convention. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 42 (2):209-211.
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  36. Anton Ehrenzweig (1975). The Psychoanalysis of Artistic Vision and Hearing: An Introduction to a Theory of Unconscious Perception. Sheldon Press.
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  37. Russell Epstein (2004). Consciousness, Art, and the Brain: Lessons From Marcel Proust. Consciousness and Cognition 13 (2):213-40.
    In his novel Remembrance of Things Past, Marcel Proust argues that conventional descriptions of the phenomenology of consciousness are incomplete because they focus too much on the highly-salient sensory information that dominates each moment of awareness and ignore the network of associations that lies in the background. In this paper, I explicate Proust’s theory of conscious experience and show how it leads him directly to a theory of aesthetic perception. Proust’s division of awareness into two components roughly corresponds to William (...)
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  38. John Fisher (1978). On Perceiving the Impossible. British Journal of Aesthetics 18 (1):19-30.
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  39. Steven Foster (1969). Eidetic Imagery and Imagiste Perception. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 28 (2):133-145.
  40. Robert Francès (1988). The Perception of Music. L. Erlbaum.
    This translation of this classic text contains a balance of cultural and biological considerations. While arguing for the strong influence of exposure and of formal training on the way that music is perceived, Frances draws on the literature concerning the amusias to illustrate his points about the types of cognitive abstraction that are performed by the listener.
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  41. Fanchon FrÖhlich (1964). The Function of Perceptual Asymmetry in Picture Space. British Journal of Aesthetics 4 (4):291-297.
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  42. Howard Gardner (1972). On Figure and Texture in Aesthetic Perception. British Journal of Aesthetics 12 (1):40-59.
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  43. Howard Gardner (1971). The Development of Sensitivity to Artistic Styles. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 29 (4):515-527.
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  44. Stefano Ghirlanda, Liselotte Jansson & Magnus Enquist (2002). Chickens Prefer Beautiful Humans. Human Nature 13 (3):383-389.
    We trained chickens to react to an average human female face but not to an average male face (or vice versa). In a subsequent test, the animals showed preferences for faces consistent with human sexual preferences (obtained from university students). This suggests that human preferences arise from general properties of nervous systems, rather than from face-specific adaptations. We discuss this result in the light of current debate on the meaning of sexual signals and suggest further tests of existing hypotheses about (...)
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  45. Daniel Gilman (1994). Pictures in Cognition. Erkenntnis 41 (1):87 - 102.
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  46. Stephen Grossberg (2006). The Art of Seeing and Painting. Technical Report.
    The human urge to represent the three-dimensional world using two-dimensional pictorial representations dates back at least to Paleolithic times. Artists from ancient to modern times have struggled to understand how a few contours or color patches on a flat surface can induce mental representations of a three-dimensional scene. This article summarizes some of the recent breakthroughs in scientifically understanding how the brain sees that shed light on these struggles. These breakthroughs illustrate how various artists have intuitively understand paradoxical properties about (...)
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  47. Harrison Hall (1981). Painting and Perceiving. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 39 (3):291-295.
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  48. James R. Hamilton (2010). Narrative, Fiction, Imagination. In Pokorny Kotatko (ed.), Fictionality-Possibility-Reality.
    Hamilton argues that narratives engage our imaginations not so much by having us pretend the events they depict are true or present as by having us engage in a kind of anticipation of events to come. The idea is that the grasp of a narratively structured presentation is explained in very much the same way any sequence of events, considered as a sequence, is grasped.
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  49. James R. Hamilton (2006). Understanding Plays. In Saltz Krasner (ed.), Staging Philosophy.
    Hamilton argues that there is a level of understanding of theatrical performances, and narrative performances in particular (called "plays"), that does not require grasp of the large-scale aesthetic features that usually inform the structure of what is presented. This "basic understanding" is required for any spectator to go on to have a deeper understanding and, so, grounds any spectator's understanding of the larger-scale features of a performance.
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  50. Gary Hatfield (1993). Helmholtz and Classicism: The Science of Aesthetics and the Aesthetics of Science. In David Cahan (ed.), Hermann von Helmholtz and the Foundations of Nineteenth-Century Science. University of California Press 522--58.
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