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  1. Douglas Anderson (1986). Review of Eva Schaper, Pleasure, Preference and Value. [REVIEW] Idealistic Studies 16 (2):186-187.
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  2. John Armstrong (2004). The Secret Power of Beauty. Allen Lane.
    A graceful and lucid study of the power of beauty and the deep significance it has in our lives In defining beauty and our response to it, we are often caught between the concrete and the sublime. We wish to categorize beauty, to clearly label its parts, and yet we wish also to celebrate its mysterious-and at times mythical-power. Armstrong's response is a discursive and graceful journey through various and complementary interpretations, leading us from Hogarth's belief that the essence of (...)
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  3. Rudolf Arnheim (1993). From Pleasure to Contemplation. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 51 (2):195-197.
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  4. Archie J. Bahm (1947). Beauty Defined. Philosophical Review 56 (5):582-586.
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  5. Katerina Bantinaki (2012). The Paradox of Horror: Fear as a Positive Emotion. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 70 (4):2012.
  6. Elizabeth Belfiore (1985). Pleasure, Tragedy and Aristotelian Psychology. Classical Quarterly 35 (02):349-.
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  7. Ermanno Bencivenga (1987). Economy of Expression and Aesthetic Pleasure. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 47 (4):615-630.
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  8. Christopher Butler (2004). Pleasure and the Arts: Enjoying Literature, Painting, and Music. Oxford University Press.
    How do the arts give us pleasure? Covering a very wide range of artistic works, from Auden to David Lynch, Rembrandt to Edward Weston, and Richard Strauss to Keith Jarrett, Pleasure and the Arts offers us an explanation of our enjoyable emotional engagements with literature, music, and painting. The arts direct us to intimate and particularized relationships, with the people represented in the works, or with those we imagine produced them. When we listen to music, look at a purely abstract (...)
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  9. Ann J. Cahill (2003). Feminist Pleasure and Feminine Beautification. Hypatia 18 (4):42-64.
    : This paper explores the conditions under which feminine beautification constitutes a feminist practice. Distinguishing between the process and product of beautification allows us to isolate those aesthetic, inter-subjective, and embodied elements that empower rather than disempower women. The empowering characteristics of beautification, however, are difficult and perhaps impossible to represent in a sexist context; therefore, while beautifying may be a positive experience for women, being viewed as a beautified object in current Western society is almost always opposed to women's (...)
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  10. William Charlton (1988). Mary Mothersill on Aesthetic Pleasure. Analysis 48 (1):40 - 44.
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  11. Jean-Pierre Cléro (forthcoming). On The Ambiguous Status of Pleasure in Bentham's Theory of Fictions. Utilitas:1-21.
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  12. Francis J. Coleman (1971). Is Aesthetic Pleasure a Myth? Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 29 (3):319-332.
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  13. Steven Connor (1992). Aesthetics, Pleasure and Value. In Stephen Regan (ed.), The Politics of Pleasure: Aesthetics and Cultural Theory. Open University Press. 203--20.
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  14. E. M. Dadlez (2013). The Pleasures of Tragedy. In James A. Harris (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of British Philosophy in the Eighteenth Century. Oxford University Press. 450.
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  15. E. M. Dadlez (2004). Pleased and Afflicted: Hume on the Paradox of Tragic Pleasure. Hume Studies 30 (2):213-236.
  16. Eva M. Dadlez (2004). Pleased and Afflicted: Hume on the Paradox of Tragic Pleasure. Hume Studies 30 (2):213-236.
  17. Eric Dayton (1999). The Pleasures of Aesthetics: Philosophical Essays Jerrold Levinson Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 1996, Xiv + 312 Pp. [REVIEW] Dialogue 38 (01):214-.
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  18. Eric Dayton (1999). The Pleasures of Aesthetics. Dialogue 38 (1):214-214.
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  19. D. C. Durst (1997). The Politics of Aesthetic Pleasure. Philosophical Inquiry 19 (1-2):18-34.
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  20. D. C. Durst (1997). The Politics of Aesthetic Pleasure. Philosophical Inquiry 19 (1-2):18-34.
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  21. Denis Dutton (2010). The Art Instinct: Beauty, Pleasure, and Human Evolution. OUP Oxford.
    The Dinka have a connoisseur's appreciation of the patterns and colours of the markings on their cattle. The Japanese tea ceremony is regarded as a performance art. Some cultures produce carving but no drawing; others specialize in poetry. Yet despite the rich variety of artistic expression to be found across many cultures, we all share a deep sense of aesthetic pleasure. The need to create art of some form is found in every human society. -/- In The Art Instinct, Denis (...)
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  22. Denis Dutton (2009). The Art Instinct: Beauty, Pleasure, & Human Evolution. Bloomsbury Press.
    Introduction -- Landscape and longing -- Art and human nature -- What is art? -- But they don't have our concept of art -- Art and natural selection -- The uses of fiction -- Art and human self-domestication -- Intention, forgery, dada : three aesthetic problems -- The contingency of aesthetic values -- Greatness in the arts.
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  23. Denis Dutton (2004). The Pleasures of Fiction. Philosophy and Literature 28 (2):453-466.
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  24. Marcia Muelder Eaton (1973). Aesthetic Pleasure and Pain. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 31 (4):481-485.
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  25. C. E. Emmer (2001). The Senses of the Sublime: Possibilities for a Non-Ocular Sublime in Kant's Critique of Judgment. In Volker Gerhardt, Rolf Horstmann & Ralph Schumacher (eds.), Kant und die Berliner Aufklärung: Akten des IX. Internationalen Kant-Kongresses, Vol. 3. Walter de Gruyter.
    It might at first seem that the senses (the five traditionally recognized conduits of outer sense) would have very little to contribute to an investigation of Kant's aesthetics. Is not Kant's aesthetic theory based on a relation of the higher cognitive faculties? Much however can be revealed by asking to what degree sight is essential to aesthetic judgment (of beauty and the sublime) as Kant describes it in the 'Critique of Judgment.' Here the sublime receives particular attention.
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  26. Susan L. Feagin (1984). Some Pleasures of Imagination. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 43 (1):41-55.
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  27. Susan L. Feagin (1983). The Pleasures of Tragedy. American Philosophical Quarterly 20 (1):95 - 104.
    I ARGUE THAT WE RECEIVE PLEASURE FROM TRAGEDIES BECAUSE WE ARE PLEASED TO FIND OURSELVES RESPONDING IN AN UNPLEASANT WAY TO HUMAN SUFFERING AND INJUSTICE. THE PLEASURE IS THUS A METARESPONSE, AND REFLECTS FEELINGS WHICH ARE AT THE BASIS OF MORALITY. THIS HELPS EXPLAIN WHY TRAGEDY IS SUPPOSED TO BE A HIGHER ART FORM THAN COMEDY, AND PROVIDES A NEW WAY OF SEEING THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN THE MORALITY OF AN ARTWORK AND ITS VALUE.
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  28. G. R. F. Ferrari (1999). Aristotle's Literary Aesthetics. Phronesis 44 (3):181 - 198.
    Against the consensus that Aristotle in the "Poetics" sets out to give tragedy a role in exercising or improving the mature citizen's moral sensibilities, I argue that his aim is rather to analyse what makes a work of literature successful in its own terms, and in particular how a tragic drama can achieve the effect of suspense. The proper pleasure of tragedy is produced by the plotting and eventual dispelling of the play's suspense. Aristotle claims that poetry 'says what is (...)
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  29. Damien Freeman (2012). Aesthetic Experience as the Transformation of Pleasure. The Harvard Review of Philosophy 17 (1):56-75.
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  30. Stacie Friend (2007). The Pleasures of Documentary Tragedy. British Journal of Aesthetics 47 (2):184-198.
    Two assumptions are common in discussions of the paradox of tragedy: (1) that tragic pleasure requires that the work be fictional or, if non-fiction, then non-transparently represented; and (2) that tragic pleasure may be provoked by a wide variety of art forms. In opposition to (1) I argue that certain documentaries could produce tragic pleasure. This is not to say that any sad or painful documentary could do so. In considering which documentaries might be plausible candidates, I further argue, against (...)
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  31. Elisa Galgut (2001). The Poetry and the Pity: Hume's Account of Tragic Pleasure. British Journal of Aesthetics 41 (4):411-424.
    I defend Hume's account of tragic pleasure against various objections. I examine his account of the emotions in order to clarify his "conversion theory". I also argue that Hume does not give us a theory of tragedy as an aesthetic genre, but rather elucidates the felt experience of a particular work of tragedy. I offer a partial reading of King Lear by way of illustration. Finally, I suggest that the experiences of aesthetic pleasure, and aesthetic sadness, share certain qualities. "Tragic (...)
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  32. Lucius Garvin (1942). Pleasure Theory in Ethics and Esthetics. Journal of Philosophy 39 (3):57-63.
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  33. Berys Gaut (2010). Nehamas on Beauty and Love. British Journal of Aesthetics 50 (2):199-204.
    In Only a Promise of Happiness Alexander Nehamas holds that beauty is the object of love. I raise three objections to this claim when formulated in terms of personal love: love is too narrow in scope to be the attitude whose formal object is beauty; one can experience a person's beauty but have no love for her; and love is of particulars, not of attributes, however specific, such as beauty. A second kind of love, hedonic love, is too broad in (...)
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  34. Rocco J. Gennaro (2000). Fiction, Pleasurable Tragedy, and the HOT Theory of Consciousness. Philosophical Papers 29 (2):107-20.
    [Final version in Philosophical Papers, 2000] Much has been made over the past few decades of two related problems in aesthetics. First, the "feeling fiction problem," as I will call it, asks: is it rational to be moved by what happens to fictional characters? How can we care about what happens to people who we know are not real?[i] Second, the so-called "paradox of tragedy" is embodied in the question: Why or how is it that we take pleasure in artworks (...)
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  35. Jonathan Gilmore (2014). That Obscure Object of Desire: Pleasure in Painful Art. In Jerrold Levinson (ed.), Suffering Art Gladly: The Paradox of Negative Emotions in Art. Palgrave/Macmillan.
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  36. Hannah Ginsborg (2003). Aesthetic Judging and the Intentionality of Pleasure. Inquiry 46 (2):164 – 181.
    I point out some unclarities in Allison's interpretation of Kant's aesthetic theory, specifically in his account of the free play of the faculties. I argue that there is a tension between Allison's commitment to the intentionality of the pleasure involved in a judgment of beauty, and his view that the pleasure is distinct from the judgment, and I claim that the tension should be resolved by rejecting the latter view. I conclude by addressing Allison's objection that my own view fails (...)
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  37. Alan H. Goldman (1990). Aesthetic Qualities and Aesthetic Value. Journal of Philosophy 87 (1):23-37.
    To say that an object is beautiful or ugly is seemingly to refer to a property of the object. But it is also to express a positive or negative response to it, a set of aesthetic values, and to suggest that others ought to respond in the same way. Such judg- ments are descriptive, expressive, and normative or prescriptive at once. These multiple features are captured well by Humean accounts that analyze the judgments as ascribing relational properties. To say that (...)
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  38. Joanne Goss (2006). Review of Matt Hills, The Pleasures of Horror. [REVIEW] Film-Philosophy 10 (3).
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  39. Joanne Goss (2006). Matt Hills' The Pleasures of Horror. [REVIEW] Film-Philosophy 10 (3).
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  40. Gordon Graham (1994). Art, Pleasure, and Play. Journal of Value Inquiry 28 (2):217-232.
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  41. Paul Guyer (2008). Back to Truth: Knowledge and Pleasure in the Aesthetics of Schopenhauer. European Journal of Philosophy 16 (2):164-178.
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  42. Paul Guyer (2007). Free Play and True Well-Being: Herder's Critique of Kant's Aesthetics. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 65 (4):353–368.
  43. Paul Guyer (2002). Free and Adherent Beauty: A Modest Proposal. British Journal of Aesthetics 42 (4):357-366.
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  44. Stephen Halliwell (1998). A. D. Nuttall: Why Does Tragedy Give Pleasure? Pp. X + 110. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1996. £20. ISBN: 0-19-818371-. The Classical Review 48 (01):205-.
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  45. Stephen Halliwell (1993). Katharsis Elizabeth S. Belfiore: Tragic Pleasures: Aristotle on Plot and Emotion. Pp. Xviii + 412. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 1992. £30. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 43 (02):253-254.
  46. Rj Hallman (1968). Aesthetic Pleasure and Creative Process. Humanitas 4 (2):161-169.
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  47. Omar Sultan Haque (2011). The Paradoxical Pleasures of Human Imagination. Philosophy and Literature 35 (1):182-189.
  48. H. L. Hix (1997). Why Does Tragedy Give Pleasure? (Review). Philosophy and Literature 21 (2):484-486.
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  49. Tomáš Hříbek (2011). Denis Dutton, The Art Instinct: Beauty, Pleasure, and Human Evolution. Estetika 48 (2):248-253.
    A review of Denis Dutton´s The Art Instinct: Beauty, Pleasure, and Human Evolution (New York: Bloomsbury Press, 2009, 280 pp. ISBN 978-1-59691-401-8).
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  50. Lawrence W. Hyman (1986). A Defence of Aesthetic Experience: In Reply to George Dickie. British Journal of Aesthetics 26 (1):62-63.
    Our response to representational art can be called "aesthetic" even if we are not "detached from cognitive and moral matters." for the pleasure we receive from "huckleberry finn" (dickie's example) is not based on its historical or sociological accuracy, Or on our agreement with its moral statements. We enjoy and value the novel because of its wit and irony, Which subvert and so transcend its cognitive and moral truths.
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