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  1. Rudolf Arnheim (1996). Beauty as Suitability. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 54 (3):251-253.
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  2. Malcolm Budd (2006). The Characterization of Aesthetic Qualities by Essential Metaphors and Quasi-Metaphors. British Journal of Aesthetics 46 (2):133-143.
    My paper examines a vital but neglected aspect of Frank Sibley's pioneering account of aesthetic concepts. This is the claim that many aesthetic qualities are such that they can be characterized adequately only by metaphors or ‘quasi-metaphors’. Although there is no indication that Sibley embraced it, I outline a radical, minimalist conception of the experience of perceiving an item as possessing an aesthetic quality, which, I believe, has wide application and which would secure Sibley's position for those aesthetic qualities that (...)
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  3. Rafael De Clercq (2013). Reflections on a Sofa Bed: Functional Beauty and Looking Fit. Journal of Aesthetic Education 47 (2):35-48.
    This essay argues for two conclusions about functional beauty, as this notion has been understood by Parsons and Carlson in a recent book by the same name. First of all, it is argued that functional beauty either is not a distinct kind of beauty or that the members of this kind are not all and only instances of the property of looking fit. Second, it is argued that functional beauty is relative only to categories corresponding to essential functions. The second (...)
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  4. Rafael De Clercq (2005). The Aesthetic Peculiarity of Multifunctional Artefacts. British Journal of Aesthetics 45 (4):412-425.
    Echoing a distinction made by David Wiggins in his discussion of the relation of identity, this paper investigates whether aesthetic adjectives such as ‘beautiful’ are sortal-relative or merely sortal-dependent. The hypothesis guiding the paper is that aesthetic adjectives, though probably sortal-dependent in general, are sortal-relative only when used to characterize multifunctional artefacts. This means that multifunctional artefacts should be unique in allowing the following situation to occur: for some object x there are sortals K and K' such that x is (...)
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  5. C. E. Emmer (1998). Kitsch Against Modernity. Art Criticism 13 (1):53-80.
    "The writer discusses the concept of kitsch. Having reviewed a variety of approaches to kitsch, he posits an historical conception of it, connecting it to modernity and defining it as a coping-mechanism for modernity. He thus suggests that kitsch is best understood as a tool in the struggle against the particular stresses of the modern world and that it uses materials at hand, fashioning from them some sort of stability largely through projecting images of nature, stasis, and continuity. He discusses (...)
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  6. Alan H. Goldman (1990). Aesthetic Qualities and Aesthetic Value. Journal of Philosophy 87 (1):23-37.
    To say that an object is beautiful or ugly is seemingly to refer to a property of the object. But it is also to express a positive or negative response to it, a set of aesthetic values, and to suggest that others ought to respond in the same way. Such judg- ments are descriptive, expressive, and normative or prescriptive at once. These multiple features are captured well by Humean accounts that analyze the judgments as ascribing relational properties. To say that (...)
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  7. Göran Hermerén (1973). Aesthetic Qualities, Value and Emotive Meaning. Theoria 39 (1-3):71-100.
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  8. D. H. Hick (2012). Aesthetic Supervenience Revisited. British Journal of Aesthetics 52 (3):301-316.
    In this paper, I hope to reintroduce debate on the issue of aesthetic supervenience, especially in light of work undertaken by metaphysicians in recent years. After providing a brief walkthrough of some of the major views on supervenience generally, including several important metaphysical distinctions, I build upon views by Jerrold Levinson, John Bender, Nick Zangwill, and Gregory Currie, to develop a realist thesis of strong local supervenience, such that aesthetic properties of artworks and other objects depend upon their formal/structural properties (...)
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  9. Peter Kivy (1968). Aesthetic Aspects and Aesthetic Qualities. Journal of Philosophy 65 (4):85-93.
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  10. Thomas Leddy (1995). Everyday Surface Aesthetic Qualities: "Neat," "Messy," "Clean," "Dirty". Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 53 (3):259-268.
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  11. Jerrold Levinson (1984). Aesthetic Supervenience. Southern Journal of Philosophy 22 (S1):93-110.
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  12. Richard Lind (1985). A Microphenomenology of Aesthetic Qualities. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 43 (4):393-403.
    Microphenomenology (the refelctive reconstruction of attentional processes operative in perception) explicates the distinction between aesthetic and nonaesthetic qualities in a way that avoids traditional objections. aesthetic qualities are identified as phenomenal manifestations of a specific sort of spontaneous attentional event. particular aesthetic qualities are show to fall within any of six different categories of features attributable to this event. some aesthetic predicates strictly imply such features while others only 'suggest' them.
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  13. Dan Moller (2014). The Boring. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 72 (2):181-191.
    This article discusses the aesthetic concept of boringness, of which there has been relatively little philosophical discussion, especially along its objective, nonpsychological dimensions. I begin by confronting skepticism about the validity of judgments about boringness and rebut suggestions to the effect that these judgments are inevitably compromised by mistakes or vices of the audience. The article then develops an account focused on certain kinds of reasonable expectations we form in a given aesthetic context. I go on to confront the question (...)
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  14. Jeffrey Olen (1979). Perception, Inference, and Aesthetic Qualities. The Monist 62 (4):482-495.
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  15. Jeffrey Olen (1977). Theories, Interpretations, and Aesthetic Qualities. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 35 (4):425-431.
    It is argued that the application of such predicates as 'is lovely' and 'is somber' to works of art must be construed relativistically. it is first argued that interpretations of works of art bear important similarities to scientific theories, such that the application of aesthetic predicates cannot proceed independently of these interpretations. it is then argued that there are important differences between scientific theories and works of art, such that relativism is precluded with respect to the former but demanded with (...)
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  16. Glenn Parsons (2008). Functional Beauty. Oxford University Press.
    Functional beauty in the aesthetic tradition -- Functional beauty in contemporary aesthetic theory -- Indeterminacy and the concept of function -- Function and form -- Nature and environment -- Architecture and the built environment -- Artefacts and everyday aesthetics -- The functions of art.
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  17. Iuliana Corina Vaida (1998). The Quest for Objectivity: Secondary Qualities and Aesthetic Qualities. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 56 (3):283-297.
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Aesthetic Qualities, Misc
  1. Derek Allan (2013). Art and Time. Cambridge Scholars.
    A well-known feature of great works of art is their power to “live on” long after the moment of their creation – to remain vital and alive long after the culture in which they were born has passed into history. This power to transcend time is common to works as various as the plays of Shakespeare, the Victory of Samothrace, and many works from early cultures such as Egypt and Buddhist India which we often encounter today in major art museums. (...)
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  2. Rafael de Clercq, Aesthetic Properties.
    Paradigmatic aesthetic properties include beauty, elegance, gracefulness, harmony, balance, loveliness, prettiness, handsomeness, and unity, as well as their negative counterparts, for example, ugliness, clumsiness and disunity. The book investigates the nature, reality, and structure(s) of these properties. It also focuses on special cases such as rightness of architectural proportion, musical beauty, functional beauty, and the aesthetic properties that are responsible for our interest in ‘painful art’ (horror and tragedy). [Manuscript is currently undergoing revision.].
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  3. Rafael de Clercq (2011). Modern Architecture and the Concept of Harmony. British Journal of Aesthetics 51 (1):69-79.
    The aim of this paper is to achieve a better understanding of why modern buildings do not easily harmonize with one another. After proposing, and defending, an analysis of the concept of architectural harmony, the paper turns to three possible views on whether we can expect more harmony from modern architecture in the future.
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  4. Rafael De Clercq (2009). Scruton on Rightness of Proportion in Architecture. British Journal of Aesthetics 49 (4):405-414.
    In The Aesthetics of Architecture, Roger Scruton makes at least four claims about rightness of architectural proportion. The present paper lists those claims, briefly discusses the way they are related, and, finally, selects one as the topic of discussion: the claim that there cannot be an exact, mathematical definition of rightness of proportion. Scruton’s arguments for this claim are reviewed. The first is found to be substantially correct, whereas the second is found to rely on a mistaken assumption, namely the (...)
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  5. Rafael De Clercq (2008). The Structure of Aesthetic Properties. Philosophy Compass 3 (5):894-909.
    Aesthetic properties are often thought to have either no evaluative component or an evaluative component that can be isolated from their descriptive component. The present article argues that this popular view is without adequate support. First, doubt is cast on the idea that some paradigmatic aesthetic properties are purely descriptive. Second, the idea that the evaluative component of an aesthetic property can always be neatly separated from its descriptive component is called into question. Meanwhile, a speculative hypothesis is launched regarding (...)
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  6. Rafael De Clercq (2007). A Note on the Aesthetics of Mirror Reversal. Philosophical Studies 132 (3):553 - 563.
    According to Roy Sorensen [Philosophical Studies 100 (2000) 175–191] an object cannot differ aesthetically from its mirror image. On his view, mirror-reversing an object – changing its left/right orientation – cannot bring about any aesthetic change. However, in arguing for this thesis Sorensen assumes that aesthetic properties supervene on intrinsic properties alone. This is a highly controversial assumption and nothing is offered in its support. Moreover, a plausible weakening of the assumption does not improve the argument. Finally, Sorensen’s second argument (...)
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  7. Rafael De Clercq (2002). The Concept of an Aesthetic Property. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 60 (2):167–176.
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  8. C. E. Emmer (2013). 9/11 as Schmaltz-Attractor: A Coda on the Significance of Kitsch. In Monica Kjellman-Chapin (ed.), Kitsch: History, Theory, Practice. Cambridge Scholars Publishing. 184-224.
    "The concluding chapter, penned by C. E. Emmer, both revisits and greatly expands upon disputations within the contested territory of kitsch as term and tool in cultural turf-war arsenals. Focusing on debates surrounding two visual responses to the terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001, Dennis Madalone's 2003 music video for the patriotic anthem 'America We Stand As One' and Jenny Ryan's 'plushie' sculpture, 'Soft 9/11,' Emmer utilizes these debates to reveal the coexisting and competing attitudes towards ostensibly kitschy objects and (...)
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  9. C. E. Emmer (2007). The Flower and the Breaking Wheel: Burkean Beauty and Political Kitsch. International Journal of the Arts in Society 2 (1):153-164.
    What is kitsch? The varieties of phenomena which can fall under the name are bewildering. Here, I focus on what has been called “traditional kitsch,” and argue that it often turns on the emotional effect specifically captured by Edmund Burke’s concept of “beauty” from his 1757 'A Philosophical Enquiry into the Sublime and Beautiful.' Burkean beauty also serves to distinguish “traditional kitsch” from other phenomena also often called “kitsch”—namely, entertainment. Although I argue that Burkean beauty in domestic decoration allows for (...)
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  10. Carol S. Gould (2005). Glamour as an Aesthetic Property of Persons. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 63 (3):237–247.
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  11. James R. Hamilton (2009). Drama. In Higgins Davies (ed.), Blackwell Companion to Aesthetics.
    Hamilton explains why "drama" is a category of literature rather than of theater, even though it is appropriate to describe many theatrical performances as "dramatic." Consideration of the possibilities of theatrical performance are especially important to this category of literature, but need not be (and often are not) decisive in constraining interpretations of dramatic works.
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  12. James R. Hamilton (2009). Pretense and Display Theories of Theatrical Performance. Organon F (4):632-654.
    A survey of and a comparison of the relative strengths of two favored views of what theatrical performers do: pretend or engage in a variety of self-display. The behavioral version of the pretense theory is shown to be relatively weak as an instrument for understanding the variety of performance styles available in world theater. Whether pretense works as a theory of the mental capacities that underly theatrical performance is a separate question.
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  13. James R. Hamilton (2007). The Art of Theater. Wiley-Blackwell.
    Hamilton argues that theatrical performances have always been regarded as works produced for inspection and evaluation in their own right. The reason this has been obscured is the enormously successful text-based literary tradition in modern European theater. To show why this is as it should be, Hamilton shows how theater's spectators pick out, grasp, and assess performances without reference to the texts they employ, even within that successful literary tradition.
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  14. Christy Mag Uidhir & Cameron Buckner (forthcoming). A Portrait of the Artist as an Aesthetic Expert. In Gregory Currie, Matthew Kieran & Aaron Meskin (eds.), Aesthetics and the Sciences. Oxford University Press.
    For the most part, the Aesthetic Theory of Art—any theory of art claiming that the aesthetic is a descriptively necessary feature of art—has been repudiated, especially in light of what are now considered traditional counterexamples. We argue that the Aesthetic Theory of Art can instead be far more plausibly recast by abandoning aesthetic-feature possession by the artwork for a claim about aesthetic-concept possession by the artist. This move productively re-frames and re-energizes the debate surrounding the relationship between art and the (...)
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  15. John Marmysz (2003). Laughing at Nothing: Humor as a Response to Nihilism. SUNY Press.
    Disputing the common misconception that nihilism is wholly negative and necessarily damaging to the human spirit, John Marmysz offers a clear and complete definition to argue that it is compatible, and indeed preferably responded to, with an attitude of good humor. He carefully scrutinizes the phenomenon of nihilism as it appears in the works, lives, and actions of key figures in the history of philosophy, literature, politics, and theology, including Nietzsche, Heidegger, Camus, and Mishima. While suggesting that there ultimately is (...)
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  16. John Marmysz (2001). Humor, Sublimity and Incongruity. Consciousness, Literature and the Arts 2 (3).
    Humorous laughter is related to the sublime experience in that it involves the transformation of a potentially unpleasant perception into a pleasurable experience. However, whereas sublimity is associated with feelings of awe and respect, humorous laughter is associated with feelings of superiority and contempt. This difference is a result of the fact that sublimity is an affective response involving an individual’s perception of vulnerability while humorous laughter is a response involving perceived invulnerability.
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  17. Patrick Maynard (2009). Drawing, Painting, and Print-Making. In Robert Hopkins (ed.), A Companion to Aesthetics: The Blackwell Companion to Philosophy, 2d rev. ed. Wiley-Blackwell.
    A short encyclopedia article focused on drawing, stressing facture, the physicality of three media.
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  18. Patrick Maynard (1997). The Engine of Visualization: Thinking Through Photography. Cornell University Press.
    First ever philosophy treatise on photography, analytic in approach but sensitive to photo-history, not confined to aesthetics or art (illus.), Walker Evans photo on cover. Papercover printing, Dec. 2000.
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  19. John Zeimbekis (2003). Propriétés Esthétiques Et Évaluation. Revue Francophone D'Esthétique (1):25-47.
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Beauty
  1. M. Budd (2011). The Love of Art: More Than a Promise of Happiness. British Journal of Aesthetics 51 (1):81-88.
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  2. N. Chaipraditkul (2013). Thailand: Beauty and Globalized Self-Identity Through Cosmetic Therapy and Skin Lightening. Ethics in Science and Environmental Politics 13 (1):27-37.
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  3. Diarmuid Costello (2004). On Late Style: Arthur Danto’s the Abuse of Beauty. British Journal of Aesthetics 44 (4):424-439.
    cannot grasp what is at stake in it without taking both its claims and its tone seriously. Read philosophically, Danto wants to reconceive art’s aesthetic dimension as those features that ‘inflect’ our attitude towards a work’s meaning, and to distinguish, in so doing, between beauty that is and beauty that is not internal to that meaning. Although welcome, I argue that his attempt to carry this through is compromised by his countervailing tendency to conceive the aesthetic in non-cognitive terms. Read (...)
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  4. Rafael de Clercq, Aesthetic Properties.
    Paradigmatic aesthetic properties include beauty, elegance, gracefulness, harmony, balance, loveliness, prettiness, handsomeness, and unity, as well as their negative counterparts, for example, ugliness, clumsiness and disunity. The book investigates the nature, reality, and structure(s) of these properties. It also focuses on special cases such as rightness of architectural proportion, musical beauty, functional beauty, and the aesthetic properties that are responsible for our interest in ‘painful art’ (horror and tragedy). [Manuscript is currently undergoing revision.].
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  5. Rhett Diessner, Ravi Iyer, Meghan M. Smith & Jonathan Haidt (2013). Who Engages with Moral Beauty? Journal of Moral Education 42 (2):139-163.
    Aristotle considered moral beauty to be the telos of the human virtues. Displays of moral beauty have been shown to elicit the moral emotion of elevation and cause a desire to become a better person and to engage in prosocial behavior. Study 1 (N = 5380) shows engagement with moral beauty is related to several psychological constructs relevant to moral education, and structural models reveal that the story of engagement with moral beauty may be considered a story of love and (...)
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  6. Rhett Diessner, Teri Rust, Rebecca Solom, Nellie Frost & Lucas Parsons (2006). Beauty and Hope: A Moral Beauty Intervention. Journal of Moral Education 35 (3):301-317.
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  7. Andreas Dorschel (2011). A Promise of Happiness. Recent Philosophical Studies of Beauty. Philosophische Rundschau 58 (3):226 - 247.
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  8. Andreas Dorschel (2011). Ein Versprechen von Glück. Neuere philosophische Studien über das Schöne. Philosophische Rundschau 58 (3):226 - 247.
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  9. C. E. Emmer (2007). The Flower and the Breaking Wheel: Burkean Beauty and Political Kitsch. International Journal of the Arts in Society 2 (1):153-164.
    What is kitsch? The varieties of phenomena which can fall under the name are bewildering. Here, I focus on what has been called “traditional kitsch,” and argue that it often turns on the emotional effect specifically captured by Edmund Burke’s concept of “beauty” from his 1757 'A Philosophical Enquiry into the Sublime and Beautiful.' Burkean beauty also serves to distinguish “traditional kitsch” from other phenomena also often called “kitsch”—namely, entertainment. Although I argue that Burkean beauty in domestic decoration allows for (...)
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  10. Jeanne-Marie Gagnebin (2005). Do conceito de Darstellung em Walter Benjamin ou verdade e beleza. Kriterion 46 (112):183-190.
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  11. Berys Gaut (2010). Nehamas on Beauty and Love. British Journal of Aesthetics 50 (2):199-204.
    In Only a Promise of Happiness Alexander Nehamas holds that beauty is the object of love. I raise three objections to this claim when formulated in terms of personal love: love is too narrow in scope to be the attitude whose formal object is beauty; one can experience a person's beauty but have no love for her; and love is of particulars, not of attributes, however specific, such as beauty. A second kind of love, hedonic love, is too broad in (...)
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  12. William Hasker (2009). Beauty and Metaphysics. European Journal for Philosophy of Religion 1 (1):65 - 76.
    It is shown through examples ranging from Parmenides and Plato to Whitehead and Wittgenstein that beauty is central among the values that have made metaphysical theories appealing and credible. A common attitude would be that the aesthetic properties of metaphysical theories may be important for effective presentation but are irrelevant to the cognitive value of the theories. This however is question-begging, since it assumes without argument that ultimate reality is indifferent to ’value considerations’ such as beauty. If on the contrary (...)
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  13. G. Katkov (1939). The Pleasant and the Beautiful. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 40:177 - 206.
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  14. Sheila Lintott (2003). Sublime Hunger: A Consideration of Eating Disorders Beyond Beauty. Hypatia 18 (4):65-86.
    : In this paper, I argue that one of the most intense ways women are encouraged to enjoy sublime experiences is via attempts to control their bodies through excessive dieting. If this is so, then the societal-cultural contributions to the problem of eating disorders exceed the perpetuation of a certain beauty ideal to include the almost universal encouragement women receive to diet, coupled with the relative shortage of opportunities women are afforded to experience the sublime.
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