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  1. John W. Bender (2001). Sensitivity, Sensibility, and Aesthetic Realism. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 59 (1):73-83.
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  2. John W. Bender (1996). Realism, Supervenience, and Irresolvable Aesthetic Disputes. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 54 (4):371-381.
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  3. Malcolm Budd (2005). Aesthetic Realism and Emotional Qualities of Music. British Journal of Aesthetics 45 (2):111-122.
    Roger Scruton appears to have been the first to argue for and articulate an anti-realist theory of aesthetic properties. In the case of emotional qualities of music, his principal argument against realism is unsound and cannot, I believe, be repaired. Nevertheless an anti-realist view of emotional qualities of music is in my view correct and I defend Scruton's insight against a rival realist conception. However, I prefer a rather different form of anti-realism to Scruton's.
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  4. Rafael De Clercq (2007). A Note on the Aesthetics of Mirror Reversal. Philosophical Studies 132 (3):553 - 563.
    According to Roy Sorensen [Philosophical Studies 100 (2000) 175-191] an object cannot differ aesthetically from its mirror image. On his view, mirror-reversing an object — changing its left/right orientation — cannot bring about any aesthetic change. However, in arguing for this thesis Sorensen assumes that aesthetic properties supervene on intrinsic properties alone. This is a highly controversial assumption and nothing is offered in its support. Moreover, a plausible weakening of the assumption does not improve the argument. Finally, Sorensen's second argument (...)
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  5. Rebecca Copenhaver (forthcoming). Thomas Reid on Aesthetic Perception. In Todd Buras & Rebecca Copenhaver (eds.), Mind, Knowledge and Action: Essays in Honor of Reid’s Tercentenary.
  6. Florian Cova & Nicolas Pain (2012). Can Folk Aesthetics Ground Aesthetic Realism? The Monist 95 (2):241-263.
    We challenge an argument that aims to support Aesthetic Realism by claiming, first, that common sense is realist about aesthetic judgments because it considers that aesthetic judgments can be right or wrong, and, second, that becauseAesthetic Realism comes from and accounts for “folk aesthetics,” it is the best aesthetic theory available.We empirically evaluate this argument by probing whether ordinary people with no training whatsoever in the subtle debates of aesthetic philosophy consider their aesthetic judgments as right or wrong. Having shown (...)
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  7. Rafael De Clercq (2008). The Structure of Aesthetic Properties. Philosophy Compass 3 (5):894-909.
    Aesthetic properties are often thought to have either no evaluative component or an evaluative component that can be isolated from their descriptive component. The present article argues that this popular view is without adequate support. First, doubt is cast on the idea that some paradigmatic aesthetic properties are purely descriptive. Second, the idea that the evaluative component of an aesthetic property can always be neatly separated from its descriptive component is called into question. Meanwhile, a speculative hypothesis is launched regarding (...)
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  8. Marcia Muelder Eaton (1998). Intention, Supervenience, and Aesthetic Realism. British Journal of Aesthetics 38 (3):279-293.
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  9. Laurence Foss (1971). Art as Cognitive: Beyond Scientific Realism. Philosophy of Science 38 (2):234-250.
    Thesis: Art like science radically affects our perceiving and thinking, and the two are substantially alike in that together--along with an inherited "natural" language system with which they overlap--they enable us to articulate the world. Science has been advanced as the measure of all things: scientific realism. By implication, art pertains to beauty, science truth. Science effects conceptual break-throughs, changes our models of natural order. On the contrary (I argue), as a nonverbal symbol system art similarly affects paradigm-induced expectations. Substantively (...)
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  10. Alan Goldman (1994). Reply to Gould and Levinson on Aesthetic Realism. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 52 (3):354-356.
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  11. Alan H. Goldman (1993). Realism About Aesthetic Properties. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 51 (1):31-37.
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  12. James Grant (2011). Metaphor and Criticism BSA Prize Essay, 2010. British Journal of Aesthetics 51 (3):237-257.
    The prevalence of colourful metaphors and figurative language in critics’ descriptions of artworks has long attracted attention. Talk of ‘liquid melodies’, ‘purple prose’, ‘soaring arches’, and the use of still more elaborate figurative descriptions, is not uncommon. My aim in this paper is to explain why metaphor is so prevalent in critical description. Many have taken the prevalence of art-critical metaphors to reveal something important about aesthetic experience and aesthetic properties. My focus is different. I attempt to determine what metaphor (...)
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  13. Edward Green (2005). A Note on Two Conceptions of Aesthetic Realism. British Journal of Aesthetics 45 (4):438-440.
    on great currency in analytic philosophical aesthetics. What is not generally known is that the American philosopher Eli Siegel called the philosophy he founded in the 1940s Aesthetic Realism. His philosophy has as its central principle: ‘The world, art, and self explain each other: each is the aesthetic oneness of opposites.’ Thus, two distinct uses of the same terminology exist, and should not be confused.
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  14. Robert Grigg (1984). Relativism and Pictorial Realism. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 42 (4):397-408.
  15. Robert Hopkins (2010). Intersubjective Validity, Realism and Aesthetics. Analysis 70 (3):557-562.
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  16. Theo A. F. Kuipers (1982). Approaching Descriptive and Theoretical Truth. Erkenntnis 18 (3):343 - 378.
    In this article I give a naturalistic-cum-formal analysis of the relation between beauty, empirical success, and truth. The analysis is based on the one hand on a hypothetical variant of the so-called 'mere-exposure effect' which has been more or less established in experimental psychology regarding exposure-affect relationships in general and aesthetic appreciation in particular (Zajonc 1968; Temme 1983; Bornstein 1989; (Ye 2000). On the other hand it is based on the formal theory of truthlikeness and truth approximation as presented in (...)
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  17. Jerrold Levinson (ed.) (2003). Oxford Companion to Aesthetics. Oxford University Press.
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  18. Eric B. Litwack (2009). Wittgenstein and Value: The Quest for Meaning. Continuum.
    Introduction -- Wittgenstein's early conception of value -- An outline of tractarian ontology -- Value, the self, and the mystical -- The lecture on ethics -- Language-games, the private language argument and aspect psychology -- Language-games -- The private language argument -- Aspect psychology -- The soul and attitudes towards the living -- Wittgenstein's general conception of the soul -- Ilham Dilman on the soul and seeing-as -- Religious contexts -- J.B. Watson and the denial of the soul -- Attitudes (...)
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  19. Raamy Majeed (forthcoming). From Zombie Art to Dead Art. Think.
    Zombie art, or salvage art, are artworks that are damaged beyond repair, deemed ‘no-longer-art’ by insurance companies, and removed from the market and stored at claims inventories due to their purported loss of value. This paper aims to make sense of the notion of zombie art. It then aims to determine whether artefacts that fall under this concept retain any aesthetic value, and whether they can genuinely cease being artworks, i.e. be dead art.
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  20. Joseph Margolis (1974). Works of Art as Physically Embodied and Culturally Emergent Entities. British Journal of Aesthetics 14 (3):187-196.
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  21. Benjamin Mott (1963). Science and the Rejection of Realism in Art. Synthese 15 (1):389 - 400.
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  22. Guy Rohrbaugh, The Ontology of Art.
    Ontology is the study of what exists and the nature of the most fundamental categories into which those existents fall. Ontologists offer a map of reality, one divided into such broad, overlapping territories as physical and mental, concrete and abstract, universal and particular. Such a map provides the setting for further philosophical investigation. Ontologists of art seek to locate works of art in this wider terrain, to say where in our universe they fit in. Their governing question is, thus, “What (...)
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  23. Iain Thomson, Heidegger's Aesthetics.
    Heidegger is against the modern tradition of philosophical “aesthetics” because he is for the true “work of art” which, he argues, the aesthetic approach to art eclipses. Heidegger's critique of aesthetics and his advocacy of art thus form a complementary whole. Section 1 orients the reader by providing a brief overview of Heidegger's philosophical stand against aesthetics, for art . Section 2 explains Heidegger's philosophical critique of aesthetics, showing why he thinks aesthetics follows from modern “subjectivism” and leads to late-modern (...)
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  24. B. R. Tilghman (2004). Reflections on Aesthetic Judgement. British Journal of Aesthetics 44 (3):248-260.
    Aesthetic realism is offered as a way of overcoming aesthetic disagreement and combating all forms of subjectivism, emotivism, and so on, with its thesis that aesthetic qualities really exist and the judgements about them are genuine statements of fact. This paper questions the intelligibility of that thesis together with its claim that aesthetic qualities are supervenient upon non-aesthetic ones. It is suggested that in this context supervenience amounts to little more than aspect perception and that allows ontological claims about supervenient (...)
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  25. Nick Zangwill (2005). Aesthetic Realism 1. In Jerrold Levinson (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Aesthetics. Oup Oxford.
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  26. Nick Zangwill (2003). Beauty. In Jerrold Levinson (ed.), Oxford Companion to Aesthetics. Oxford University Press.
    I shall discuss several related issues about beauty. These are: (1) The place of beauty among other aesthetic properties. (2) The general principle of aesthetic supervenience. (3) The problem of aesthetic relevance. (4) The distinction between free and dependent beauty. (5) The primacy of our appreciation of free beauty over our appreciation of dependent beauty. (6) Personal beauty as a species of beauty. (7) The metaphysics of beauty.
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  27. John Zeimbekis (2006). Qu'est-Ce Qu'un Jugement Esthétique? Chs1,2 Online. Vrin.
    Among the book's arguments: Aesthetic property relativism, as described by Alan Goldman, requires subjects to make judgments based on prima facie preferences for determinable properties (eg being curved, being blue). These judgments are not bona fide because they do not require acquaintance with objects. Value concepts and aesthetic (thick) concepts relate contingently. We can be aesthetic property realists, or quasi-realists, without being aesthetic value realists. Contains epistemological arguments against neuro-aesthetics (Ramachandran), aesthetic sense theory (Hutcheson), physiological theories (Burke), and Hume's realism.
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