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  1. David B. Allison (2005). Nietzsche's Aesthetic Taste for Moral Metacritique. Symposium 9 (2):153-167.
  2. Carl Baker (2012). Indexical Contextualism and the Challenges From Disagreement. Philosophical Studies 157 (1):107-123.
    In this paper I argue against one variety of contextualism about aesthetic predicates such as “beautiful.” Contextualist analyses of these and other predicates have been subject to several challenges surrounding disagreement. Focusing on one kind of contextualism— individualized indexical contextualism —I unpack these various challenges and consider the responses available to the contextualist. The three responses I consider are as follows: giving an alternative analysis of the concept of disagreement; claiming that speakers suffer from semantic blindness; and claiming that attributions (...)
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  3. John W. Bender (1997). On Shiner's "Hume and the Causal Theory of Taste". Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 55 (3):317-320.
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  4. John Blewitt (1993). Film, Ideology and Bourdieu's Critique of Public Taste. British Journal of Aesthetics 33 (4):367-372.
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  5. Noel Carroll (1984). Hume's Standard of Taste. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 43 (2):181-194.
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  6. Marcia Cavell (1975). Taste and the Moral Sense. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 34 (1):29-33.
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  7. Frank P. Chambers (1963). The History of Art and the History of Taste. British Journal of Aesthetics 3 (3):234-236.
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  8. Ted Cohen (2004). The Philosophy of Taste : Thoughts on the Idea. In Peter Kivy (ed.), The Blackwell Guide to Aesthetics. Blackwell Pub.. 171.
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  9. C. F. Cornford (1968). The Question of Bad Taste. British Journal of Aesthetics 8 (3):215-226.
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  10. Timothy M. Costelloe (2007). Aesthetics and Morals in the Philosophy of David Hume. Routledge.
    General rules and "of the standard of taste" -- Aesthetic beauty and moral beauty -- Antinomy and error -- Reflection and character -- Beauty and moral life -- Progress and prejudice -- Philosophy and moral life.
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  11. Daniel Cottom (1981). Taste and the Civilized Imagination. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 39 (4):367-380.
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  12. Arthur Coleman Danto (1998). The Wake of Art: Essays: Criticism, Philosophy and the Ends of Taste. G+B Arts Int'l.
    Since the mid-1980s, Arthur C. Danto has been increasingly concerned with the implications of the demise of modernism. Out of the wake of modernist art, Danto discerns the emergence of a radically pluralistic art world. His essays illuminate this novel art world as well as the fate of criticism within it. As a result, Danto has crafted the most compelling philosophy of art criticism since Clement Greenberg. Gregg Horowitz and Tom Huhn analyze the constellation of philosophical and critical elements in (...)
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  13. Fermin de Urmeneta (1953). Reflections on the Concepts of Taste and Art. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 12 (2):197-204.
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  14. Galvano Della Volpe (1991). Critique of Taste. Verso.
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  15. George Dickie (2003). James Shelley on Critical Principles. British Journal of Aesthetics 43 (1):57-64.
    James Shelley claims that Hume's principles of taste have value-neutral subjects rather than value-laden ones that, for example, refer to aesthetic properties. I try to rebut his claim. I argue that Hume's essay on taste contains the conceptual means for recognizing the problem of the interaction of aesthetic properties with other properties in artworks, even if he does not explicitly make this point. I also deny Shelley's contention that I claim that principles are used as part of a temporal process (...)
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  16. George Dickie (1996). The Century of Taste: The Philosophical Odyssey of Taste in the Eighteenth Century. Oxford University Press.
    The Century of Taste offers an exposition and critical account of the central figures in the early development of the modern philosophy of art. Dickie traces the modern theory of taste from its first formulation by Francis Hutcheson, to blind alleys followed by Alexander Gerard and Archibald Allison, its refinement and complete expression by Hume, and finally to its decline in the hands of Kant. In a clear and straightforward style, Dickie offers sympathetic discussions of the theoretical aims of these (...)
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  17. George Dickie (1989). Kant, Mothersill and Principles of Taste. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 47 (4):375-376.
  18. George Dickie (1984). Stolnitz's Attitude: Taste and Perception. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 43 (2):195-203.
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  19. George Dickie (1973). Taste and Attitude: The Origin of the Aesthetic. Theoria 39 (1-3):153-170.
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  20. Mary Douglas (1996). Thought Styles: Critical Essays on Good Taste. Sage Publications.
    We know we have thoughts, but are we aware that we have styles of thought? This book, written by one of the most gifted and celebrated social thinkers of our time, is a contribution to understanding the rules of the different styles of thinking. Author Mary Douglas takes us through a range of thought styles from the vulgar to the refined. Throughout this fascinating journey, Thought Styles shows us how the different styles work and how outsiders can learn the styles (...)
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  21. Umberto Eco & Alastair McEwen (eds.) (2005). History of Beauty. Rizzoli.
    What is beauty? What is art? What is taste and fashion? Is beauty something to be observed coolly and rationally or is it something dangerously involving? So begins Umberto Eco's intriguing journey into the aesthetics of beauty, in which he explores the ever-changing concept of the beautiful from the ancient Greeks to today. While closely examining the development of the visual arts and drawing on works of literature from each era, Eco broadens his enquiries to consider a range of concepts, (...)
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  22. Hans Jürgen Eysenck (1971). Factors Determining Aesthetic Preferences for Geometrical Designs and Devices. British Journal of Aesthetics 11 (2):154-166.
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  23. Christopher Browne Garnett (1968). Taste. New York, Exposition Press.
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  24. Alan H. Goldman (1990). The Education of Taste. British Journal of Aesthetics 30 (2):105-116.
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  25. Theodore Gracyk (2011). Delicacy in Hume's Theory of Taste. Journal of Scottish Philosophy 9 (1):1-16.
    David Hume's celebrated essay ‘‘Of the Standard of Taste’’ is the central text for understanding Hume's aesthetic theory, yet an important claim in that essay has received inadequate attention in the literature. Although it is understood that Hume stresses the importance of delicacy of taste, it is less well understood that this delicacy is a delicacy of imagination, which is distinct from a delicacy of perception. Using both the essay and other texts to elucidate this thesis, it appears that Hume's (...)
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  26. Theodore A. Gracyk (1994). Rethinking Hume's Standard of Taste. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 52 (2):169-182.
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  27. Theodore A. Gracyk (1990). Having Bad Taste. British Journal of Aesthetics 30 (2):117-131.
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  28. Clement Greenberg (1999). Homemade Esthetics: Observations on Art and Taste. Oxford University Press.
    Thanks to his unsurpassed eye and his fearless willingness to take a stand, Clement Greenberg (1909 1994) became one of the giants of 20th century art criticism a writer who set the terms of critical discourse from the moment he burst onto the scene with his seminal essays Avant Garde and Kitsch (1939) and Towards a Newer Laocoon (1940). In this work, which gathers previously uncollected essays and a series of seminars delivered at Bennington in 1971, Greenberg provides his most (...)
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  29. Paul Guyer (2008). Humean Critics, Imaginative Fluency, and Emotional Responsiveness: A Follow-Up to Stephanie Ross. British Journal of Aesthetics 48 (4):445-456.
    In ‘Humean Critics: Real or Ideal?’ (BJA 48 (2008): 20-28), Stephanie Ross argues that four of Hume's five criteria for qualified critics in “Of the Standard of Taste’, namely practise, comparison, freedom from prejudice, and good sense, should be understood as conditions for improving the basic constituent of taste, namely delicacy of perception, in real critics whose judgments can be canonical or guiding for the rest of us, but that delicacy of perception needs to be supplemented by what she calls (...)
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  30. Thomas Hastings (1822/1974). Dissertation on Musical Taste. New York,Da Capo Press.
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  31. Daniel Alan Herwitz (2008). Aesthetics: Key Concepts in Philosophy. Continuum.
    Introduction and the birth of aesthetics -- Taste and judgment -- Art and experience -- Modern definitions of art and the problem of new media -- Conclusion: Art and truth.
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  32. David Hume (1965). Of the Standard of Taste, and Other Essays. Indianapolis, Bobbs-Merrill.
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  33. David Hume (1757/1970). Four Dissertations. New York,Garland Pub..
    DISSERTATION T. The Natural History of Religion. INTRODUCTION. AS every enquiry, which regards Religion, is of the utmost importance, there are two ...
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  34. David Hume (1757). Of the Standard of Taste. In , Essays: Moral, Political and Literary. Libertyclassics (1987). 226-249.
  35. Steven A. Jauss (2006). Associationism and Taste Theory in Archibald Alison's Essays. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 64 (4):415–428.
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  36. Harriet Jeffery (1947). Some Problems in the Philosophy of Art Criticism. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 5 (4):296-301.
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  37. Julian Johnson (2002). Who Needs Classical Music?: Cultural Choice and Musical Value. Oxford University Press.
    During the last few decades, most cultural critics have come to agree that the division between "high" and "low" art is an artificial one, that Beethoven's Ninth and "Blue Suede Shoes" are equally valuable as cultural texts. In Who Needs Classical Music?, Julian Johnson challenges these assumptions about the relativism of cultural judgements. The author maintains that music is more than just "a matter of taste": while some music provides entertainment, or serves as background noise, other music claims to function (...)
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  38. Matthew Kieran (2010). The Vice of Snobbery: Aesthetic Knowledge, Justification and Virtue in Art Appreciation. Philosophical Quarterly 60 (239):243-263.
    Apparently snobbery undermines justification for and legitimacy of aesthetic claims. It is also pervasive in the aesthetic realm, much more so than we tend to presume. If these two claims are combined, a fundamental problem arises: we do not know whether or not we are justified in believing or making aesthetic claims. Addressing this new challenge requires an epistemological story which underpins when, where and why snobbish judgement is problematic, and how appreciative claims can survive. This leads towards a virtue-theoretic (...)
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  39. Matthew Kieran (2008). Why Ideal Critics Are Not Ideal: Aesthetic Character, Motivation and Value. British Journal of Aesthetics 48 (3):278-294.
    On a contemporary Humean-influenced view, the responses of suitably idealized appreciators are presented as tracking, or even determining, facts about artistic value. Focusing on the intra-personal case, this paper argues that (i) facts about the refinement and reconfiguration of aesthetic character together with (ii) the manner in which autobiography and character are implicated in artistic appreciation make it de facto unlikely that we can reliably come to know how our ideal counterpart would respond to a given artwork. Attribution of superhuman (...)
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  40. Matthew Kieran (2005). Revealing Art. Routledge.
    Why does art matter to us, and what makes good art? Why is the role of imagination so important in art? Illustrated with carefully chosen color and black-and-white plates of examples from Michelangelo to Matisse and Poussin to Jackson Pollock, Revealing Art explores some of the most important questions we can ask about art. Matthew Kieran clearly but forcefully asks how art inspires us and disgusts us and whether artistic judgment is simply a matter of taste, and if art can (...)
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  41. Peter Kivy (1967). Hume's Standard of Taste: Breaking the Circle. British Journal of Aesthetics 7 (1):57-66.
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  42. Dudley Knowles, John Skorupski & Flint Schier (eds.) (1993). Virtue and Taste: Essays on Politics, Ethics, and Aesthetics: In Memory of Flint Schier. Blackwell.
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  43. Carolyn W. Korsmeyer (1976). Hume and the Foundations of Taste. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 35 (2):201-215.
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  44. Jerrold Levinson (2013). Reply to Nicholas Riggle's “Levinson on the Aesthetic Ideal”. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 71 (3):281-282.
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  45. Jerrold Levinson (2002). Hume's Standard of Taste: The Real Problem. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 60 (3):227–238.
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  46. Dominic McIver Lopes (2008). Virtues of Art: Good Taste. Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 82 (1):197-211.
    If good taste is a virtue, then an account of good taste might be modelled on existing accounts of moral or epistemic virtue. One good reason to develop such an account is that it helps solve otherwise intractable problems in aesthetics. This paper proposes an alternative to neo-Aristotelian models of good taste. It then contrasts the neo-Aristotelian models with the proposed model, assessing them for their potential to contend with otherwise intractable problems in aesthetics.
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  47. Edward E. Lowinsky (1965). Taste, Style, and Ideology in Eighteenth-Century Music. Johns Hopkins Press.
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  48. Michelle Mason (2001). Moral Prejudice and Aesthetic Deformity: Rereading Hume's "of the Standard of Taste&Quot;. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 59 (1):59-71.
    Despite appeals to Hume in debates over moralism in art criticism, we lack an adequate account of Hume’s moralist aesthetics, as presented in “Of the Standard of Taste.” I illuminate that aesthetics by pursuing a problem, the moral prejudice dilemma, that arises from a tension between the “freedom from prejudice” Hume requires of aesthetic judges and what he says about the relevance of moral considerations to art evaluation. I disarm the dilemma by investigating the taxonomy of prejudices by which Hume (...)
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  49. Kevin Melchionne (2011). A New Problem for Aesthetics. Contemporary Aesthetics 9.
    The essay introduces the problem of aesthetic unreliability, the variety of ways in which it is difficult to grasp our aesthetic experience and the consequent confusion and unreliability of what we take as our taste.
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  50. Kevin Melchionne (2010). On the Old Saw “I Know Nothing About Art but I Know What I Like&Quot;. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 68 (2):131-141.
    The theory of taste faces a neglected epistemological problem. The cultivation of taste is functionally dependent upon self-knowledge of aesthetic satisfaction and its causes, in other words, knowing what we like and why. However, reservations about the reliability of our knowledge of our responses, commonplace in social psychology and the philosophy of mind, pose serious obstacles to the theory of taste. I argue for a weak fallibilism with respect to introspective beliefs about aesthetic experience. I call for a naturalistic approach (...)
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