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  1. Günter Abel (1991). Logic, Art, and Understanding in the Philosophy of Nelson Goodman. Inquiry 34 (3 & 4):311 – 321.
    This paper contains a reconstruction and discussion of some central subjects in Nelson Goodman's philosophical work. Goodman's creative symbol-constructional philosophy concerns fundamental aspects of human cognition and practice. It is argued that this provides us with the intellectual tools for constructing a genuine relationship between logic, knowledge, art, and understanding. This is shown by focusing on subjects ranging from the projectibility of predicates and nominalistic mereology to constructive relativity, ways of worldmaking and a general theory of symbols.
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  2. Antony Aumann (forthcoming). Emotion, Cognition, and the Value of Literature: The Case of Nietzsche’s Genealogy. Journal of Nietzsche Studies.
    One striking feature of On the Genealogy of Morals concerns how it is written. Nietzsche utilizes a literary style that provokes his readers’ emotions. Recently, Christopher Janaway has argued that this approach is integral to Nietzsche’s philosophical goals: feeling the emotions Nietzsche’s style arouses is necessary for understanding the views he defends. This paper shows that Janaway’s position is tempting but mistaken. The temptation exists because our emotions often function as “tools of discovery.” They bring things into focus we otherwise (...)
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  3. Ismay Barwell (2009). Understanding Narratives and Narrative Understanding. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 67 (1):49-59.
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  4. Ruben Berrios (2003). Sublime Understanding: Aesthetic Reflection in Kant and Hegel. British Journal of Aesthetics 43 (4):422-424.
  5. Alessandro Bertinetto (2006). Arte como desrealización. Daimon 39:175-185.
    The paper recognizes the failure of contemporary non-aesthetic theories of art and aims at recovering the phenomenological notion of derealization – which re-emerges in A. Dantoʼs idea of the ʻbracketting effectʼ of art –, in order to explain art and art-experience. The main point is that art makes us free from the ʻreal worldʼ through an act of derealization that leads to the establishment of possible or fictional worlds different from the one we live in. Artworks are primarly imaginary, unreal (...)
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  6. Harry Blocker (1965). Kant's Theory of the Relation of Imagination and Understanding in Aesthetic Judgements of Taste. British Journal of Aesthetics 5 (1):37-45.
  7. Malcolm Budd (2003). The Acquaintance Principle. British Journal of Aesthetics 43 (4):386-392.
    The Acquaintance Principle maintains that aesthetic knowledge must be acquired through first-hand experience of the object of knowledge and cannot be transmitted from person to person. This implies that aesthetic knowledge of an object cannot be acquired either from an accurate description of the non-aesthetic features of the object or from reliable testimony of its aesthetic character. The question I address is whether there is any sound argument in support of the Principle. I give scant consideration to the possibility of (...)
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  8. Margaret H. Bulley (1937). Art and Understanding. London, B. T. Batsford, Ltd..
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  9. Nicolas J. Bullot & Rolf Reber (2013). The Artful Mind Meets Art History: Toward a Psycho-Historical Framework for the Science of Art Appreciation. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 36 (2):123-180.
    Research seeking a scientific foundation for the theory of art appreciation has raised controversies at the intersection of the social and cognitive sciences. Though equally relevant to a scientific inquiry into art appreciation, psychological and historical approaches to art developed independently and lack a common core of theoretical principles. Historicists argue that psychological and brain sciences ignore the fact that artworks are artifacts produced and appreciated in the context of unique historical situations and artistic intentions. After revealing flaws in the (...)
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  10. Allen Carlson (2000). Aesthetics and the Environment: The Appreciation of Nature, Art, and Architecture. Routledge.
    Aesthetics and the Environment presents fresh and fascinating insights into our interpretation of the environment. Traditional aesthetics is often associated with the appreciation of art, but Allen Carlson shows how much of our aesthetic experience does not encompass art but nature--in our response to sunsets, mountains or horizons or more mundane surroundings, like gardens or the view from our window. Carlson argues that knowledge of what it is we are appreciating is essential to having an appropriate aesthetic experience and that (...)
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  11. Allen Carlson (1995). Nature, Aesthetic Appreciation, and Knowledge. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 53 (4):393-400.
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  12. Peter A. Carmichael (1961). Aesthetic Knowledge. Journal of Philosophy 58 (14):378-387.
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  13. David Carr (1999). Art, Practical Knowledge and Aesthetic Objectivity. Ratio 12 (3):240–256.
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  14. Noël Carroll (2001). Beyond Aesthetics: Philosophical Essays. Cambridge University Press.
    Beyond Aesthetics brings together philosophical essays addressing art and related issues by one of the foremost philosophers of art at work today. Countering conventional aesthetic theories - those maintaining that authorial intention, art history, morality and emotional responses are irrelevant to the experience of art - Noël Carroll argues for a more pluralistic and commonsensical view in which all of these factors can play a legitimate role in our encounter with art works. Throughout, the book combines philosophical theorizing with illustrative (...)
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  15. L. B. Cebik (1990). Knowledge or Control as the End of Art. British Journal of Aesthetics 30 (3):244-255.
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  16. Ron Chrisley (2008). Painting an Experience: Las Meninas, Consciousness and the Aesthetic Mode. Journal of Consciousness Studies 15 (9):40-45.
    Paintings are usually paintings of things: a room in a palace, a princess, a dog. But what would it be to paint not those things, but the experience of seeing those things? Las Meninas is sufficiently sophisticated and masterfully executed to help us explore this question. Of course, there are many kinds of paintings: some abstract, some conceptual, some with more traditional subjects. Let us start with a focus on naturalistically depictive paintings: paintings that aim to cause an experience in (...)
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  17. Mark Colyvan (2002). Mathematics and Aesthetic Considerations in Science. Mind 111 (441):69-74.
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  18. Gregory Currie (2004). Arts and Minds. Oxford University Press.
    Philosophical questions about the arts go naturally with other kinds of questions about them. Art is sometimes said to be an historical concept. But where in our cultural and biological history did art begin? If art is related to play and imagination, do we find any signs of these things in our nonhuman relatives? Sometimes the other questions look like ones the philosopher of art has to answer. Anyone who thinks that interpretation in the arts is an activity that leaves (...)
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  19. David Davies (1998). McAllister's Aesthetics in Science: A Critical Notice. International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 12 (1):25 – 32.
    In Beauty and Revolution in Science, James McAllister argues that a sophisticated rationalist image of science can accommodate two prominent features of actual scientific practice, namely, appeals to “aesthetic” criteria in theory choice, and the occurrence of scientific “revolutions”. The aesthetic criteria to which scientists appeal are, he maintains, inductively grounded in the empirical record of competing theories, and scientific revolutions involve changes in aestheic criteria bu continuity in empirical criteria of theory choice. I raise difficulties for McAllister's account concerning: (...)
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  20. Stephen Davies (2011). Musical Understandings. New York;Oxford University Press.
    In this chapter, I discuss the kinds of understanding expected of and evinced by skilled listeners, performers, analysts, and composers. I confine the discussion to Western, purely instrumental music, mainly with the classical tradition in mind.[1] And I refer primarily to the Anglophone literature of "analytic" philosophy of music. As will become apparent, my concern is with an analysis that maps what are meant to be familiar aspects of musical experience. I investigate the various understandings expected of an accomplished listener, (...)
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  21. Stephen Davies (1994). Musical Understanding and Musical Kinds. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 52 (1):69-81.
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  22. Peter De Bolla (2003). The Education of the Eye: Painting, Landscape, and Architecture in Eighteenth-Century Britain. Stanford University Press.
    The Education of the Eye examines the origins of visual culture in eighteenth-century Britain. It claims that at the moment when works of visual art were first displayed and contemplated as aesthetic objects two competing descriptions of the viewer or spectator promoted two very different accounts of culture. The first was constructed on knowledge, on what one already knew, while the second was grounded in the eye itself. Though the first was most likely to lead to a socially and politically (...)
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  23. Rafael De Clercq (2000). Aesthetic Ineffability. Journal of Consciousness Studies 7 (8-9):87-97.
    In this paper I argue that recent attempts at explaining aesthetic ineffability have been unsuccessful. Either they misrepresent what aesthetic ineffability consists in, or they leave important aspects of it unexplained. I then show how a more satisfying account might be developed, once a distinction is made between two kinds of awareness.
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  24. John Dilworth (2005). The Double Content of Art. Prometheus Books.
    The Double Content view is the first comprehensive theory of art that is able to satisfactorily explain the nature of all kinds of artworks in a unified way — whether paintings, novels, or musical and theatrical performances. The basic thesis is that all such representational artworks involve two levels or kinds of representation: a first stage in which a concrete artifact represents an artwork, and a second stage in which that artwork in turn represents its subject matter. "Dilworth applies his (...)
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  25. Denis Dutton (1977). Plausibility and Aesthetic Interpretation. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 7 (2):327 - 340.
    If a catalogue were made of terms commonly used to affirm the adequacy of critical interpretations of works of art, one word certain to be included would be “plausible.” Yet this term is one which has received precious little attention in the literature of aesthetics. This is odd, inasmuch as I find the notion of plausibility central to an understanding of the nature of criticism. “Plausible” is a perplexing term because it can have radically different meanings depending on the circumstances (...)
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  26. Hans Heinrich Eggebrecht (2010). Understanding Music: The Nature and Limits of Musical Cognition. Ashgate.
    Understanding Music summarizes Eggebrecht's thoughts on the relationship between music and cognition.
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  27. Catherine Z. Elgin (2000). Reorienting Aesthetics, Reconceiving Cognition. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 58 (3):219-225.
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  28. Catherine Z. Elgin (1993). Understanding: Art and Science. Synthese 95 (1):196-208.
    The arts and the sciences perform many of the same cognitive functions, both serving to advance understanding. This paper explores some of the ways exemplification operates in the two fields. Both scientific experiments and works of art highlight, underscore, display, or convey some of their own features. They thereby focus attention on them, and make them available for examination and projection. Thus, the Michelson-Morley experiment exemplifies the constancy of the speed of light. Jackson Pollock'sNumber One exemplifies the viscosity of paint. (...)
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  29. Eugene Clinton Elliott (1958). On the Understanding of Color in Painting. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 16 (4):453-470.
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  30. Gideon Engler (2005). Einstein, His Theories, and His Aesthetic Considerations. International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 19 (1):21 – 30.
    This article deals with the question whether aesthetic considerations affected Einstein in formulating both his theories of relativity. The opinions of philosophers and historians alike are divided on this matter. Thus, Gerald Holton supports the view that Einstein employed aesthetic considerations in formulating his theory of special relativity whereas Jim Shelton opposes it, one of his reasons being that Einstein did not mention such considerations. The other theory, namely, that of general relativity, is discussed by John D. Norton. He asserts (...)
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  31. Peter Forrest (1991). Aesthetic Understanding. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 51 (3):525-540.
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  32. Kerry Freedman (2001). How Do We Understand Art? : Aesthetics and the Problem of Meaning in the Curriculum. In Paul Duncum & Ted Bracey (eds.), On Knowing: Art and Visual Culture. Canterbury University Press.
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  33. Jakob Friedrich Fries (1989). Knowledge, Belief, and Aesthetic Sense. Jürgen Dinter, Verlag für Philosophie.
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  34. Berys Gaut (1997). Metaphor and the Understanding of Art. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 97 (3):223–241.
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  35. John Gibson (2008). Cognitivism and the Arts. Philosophy Compass 3 (4):573-589.
    Cognitivism in respect to the arts refers to a constellation of positions that share in common the idea that artworks often bear, in addition to aesthetic value, a significant kind of cognitive value. In this paper I concentrate on three things: (i) the challenge of understanding exactly what one must do if one wishes to defend a cognitivist view of the arts; (ii) common anti-cognitivist arguments; and (iii) promising recent attempts to defend cognitivism.
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  36. Gordon Graham (2002). Art and Knowledge. British Journal of Aesthetics 42 (4):432-434.
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  37. Mitchell Green (2010). How and What We Can Learn From Fiction. In Garry Hagberg & Walter Jost (eds.), A Companion to the Philosophy of Literature. Wiley-Blackwell.
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  38. Steffen W. Gross (2002). The Neglected Programme of Aesthetics. British Journal of Aesthetics 42 (4):403-414.
    Aesthetics is today widely seen as the philosophy of art and/or beauty, limited to artworks and their perception. In this paper, I will argue that today's aesthetics and the original programme developed by the German Enlightenment thinker Alexander Gottlieb Baumgarten in the first half of the eighteenth century have only the name in common. Baumgarten did not primarily develop his aesthetics as a philosophy of art. The making and understanding of artworks had served in his original programme only as an (...)
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  39. Robert Guay, Aesthetics of Appearing. By Martin Seel. Translated by John Farrell. Stanford: Stanford University Press. 2005. Pp. XIV + 238. £16.95. [REVIEW]
    One of the many virtues of Martin Seel’s Aesthetics of Appearing is that it lays its cards on the table at the very outset. The final three chapters consist in a series of complex digressions from the main discussion: one on the aesthetic significance of ‘resonating’(p. 139), one organized around the metaphysics of pictures, and one charged with defending the implausible claim that the artistic representation of violence is uniquely capable of revealing ‘what is violent about violence’ (p. 191). But (...)
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  40. Anoop Gupta (2010). Rethinking Aristotle's Poetics : The Pragmatic Aspect of Art and Knowledge. Journal of Aesthetic Education 44 (4):60-80.
    And in general it is a sign of the man who knows and of the man who does not know that the former can teach, and therefore we think art more truly knowledge than experience is; for the artist can teach, and men of experience cannot. When pragmatism first gained favor in the early twentieth century, some British philosophers like Russell regarded it as evidencing their perception of America’s crude and enterprising spirit.1 The Imperial jab lay in this: that just (...)
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  41. James Harold (2000). Empathy with Fictions. British Journal of Aesthetics 40 (3):340-355.
    IT IS DIFFICULT for me to read Pride and Prejudice without empathizing either with Elizabeth Bennet, or sometimes with her father, Mr Bennet. Not only do my own responses to and opinions of the events and characters of the book at times resemble theirs, but even when they do not, I find myself seeing the event from Elizabeth’s or Mr Bennet’s point of view. For example, at the close of the book, Elizabeth’s former dislike of Mr Darcy has completely vanished, (...)
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  42. Carl R. Hausman (1964). Intradiction: An Interpretation of Aesthetic Understanding. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 22 (3):249-261.
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  43. Johann Gottfried Herder (2002). Sculpture: Some Observations on Shape and Form From Pygmalion's Creative Dream. University of Chicago Press.
    "The eye that gathers impressions is no longer the eye that sees a depiction on a surface it becomes a hand, the ray of light becomes a finger, and the imagination becomes a form of immediate touching."-Johann Gottfried Herder Long recognized as one of the most important eighteenth-century works on aesthetics and the visual arts, Johann Gottfried Herder's Plastik (Sculpture, 1778) has never before appeared in a complete English translation. In this landmark essay, Herder combines rationalist and empiricist thought with (...)
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  44. Marcus Hester (1975). Science and the Painter's Knowledge. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 34 (1):73-74.
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  45. Erkki Huovinen (2008). Levels and Kinds of Listeners' Musical Understanding. British Journal of Aesthetics 48 (3):315-337.
    This article examines an account of the listener's musical understanding put forward by Stephen Davies. I begin by discussing Davies's "expressibility requirement", according to which a musical listener should be able to express his understanding in sentences that are truth-apt. This is followed by a reconstruction of Davies's argument for the idea that high levels of musical understanding can be attained without possessing music-theoretical concepts. Such a conclusion is seen to follow from his belief that although musical understandings may be (...)
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  46. Sherri Irvin (2007). Forgery and the Corruption of Aesthetic Understanding. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 37 (2):283-304.
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  47. Dale Jacquette (2006). Intention, Meaning, and Substance in the Phenomenology of Abstract Painting. British Journal of Aesthetics 46 (1):38-58.
    Trying to make sense of abstract painting has resulted in interesting but often inexact and inadequately motivated efforts to characterize what is distinctive about modern art. The present account begins with Gertrude Stein's description of the fascination she experiences in viewing painted surfaces and proceeds through a number of efforts to justify or severely criticize abstract painting in relation to more traditional representational works. The basis for a phenomenology of abstract painting is suggested by James Elkins's first-person analysis of the (...)
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  48. Marzenna Jakubczak (2011). Przyroda w filozofii i kulturze Indii. Kultura Współczesna (1):171-182.
    W artykule rozważane są rozmaite semantyczne i symboliczne relacje, w jakich ujmuje się przyrodę na gruncie filozofii, kosmologii i estetyki indyjskiej. Punktem wyjścia jest charakterystyka wewnętrznej dynamiki przyrody, w którą wpisane jest nieustanne zderzanie się biegunowych jakości. Przedstawione są m.in. wedyjskie kosmogoniczne rozważania, konstatujące samorodność i substancjalną jednorodność cyklicznej natury, oraz pięć reprezentatywnych filozoficznych koncepcji przyrody. Autorka podkreśla także swoistą współzależność pomiędzy afirmowaną wizją przyrody a kulturowymi reprezentacjami natury ludzkiej.
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  49. Dale Jamieson (1986). The Importance of Being Conceptual. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 45 (2):117-123.
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  50. Mark Johnson (2007). The Meaning of the Body: Aesthetics of Human Understanding. University of Chicago Press.
    The belief that the mind and the body are separate and that the mind is the source of all meaning has been a part of Western culture for centuries. Both philosophers and scientists have questioned this dualism, but their efforts have rarely converged. Many philosophers continue to rely on disembodied models of human thought, while scientists tend to reduce the complex process of thinking to a merely physical phenomenon. In The Meaning of the Body , Mark Johnson continues his pioneering (...)
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